Recommandations françaises du Comité de cancérologie de l’AFU – actualisation 2020–2022 : tumeurs de la vessie

20 novembre 2020

Auteurs : M. Rouprêt, G. Pignot, A. Masson-Lecomte, E. Compérat, F. Audenet, M. Roumiguié, N. Houédé, S. Larré, S. Brunelle, E. Xylinas, Y. Neuzillet, A. Méjean
Référence : Prog Urol, 2020, 12, 30, S78, suppl. 12S
</
   
 
 

 

 

Epidemiology - Risk factors

Bladder cancer (BC) is diagnosed or treated in 2.7 million people worldwide each year, and the majority occur after the age of 60 [1

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. In France, with an estimated 13,074 new cases and 5,335 deaths in 2018, 80% of which were in men, this disease ranks 4th in incidence and 7th in deaths of all cancers combined (InVs 2018) and is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer. BC is responsible for 3% of all deaths caused by cancer. The incidence increases by approximately 1% per year, with a higher growth rate in women than in men.

Prevention of BC is based on the active fight against the main risk factor, smoking [2

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Physical inactivity, metabolic syndrome and water intake of more than 2 litres/day have also been correlated with an increase in the risk of BC [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. In a population at risk for BC due to previous occupational exposure which prompts targeted screening, the recommendations of the SFMT (French Association of Occupational Medicine) in collaboration with the SFC (French Cancer Association) and the AFU (French Urology Association) recommend that screening be implemented 20 years after the beginning of bladder carcinogen exposure. The proposed medical surveillance protocol is summarised in the algorithm in Figure 1 (#tabr1). [4

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Figure 1
Figure 1. 

Medical surveillance strategy for professionals at risk of BC.

 

 

Pathology

 

TNM classification (p and yp*)

NMIBC is used for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC) and MIBC in case of tumour invasion of the detrusor muscle. The TNM 2017 classification is used as a reference (Table 1) (#tabr2) [5

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Urine cytology

Together with cystoscopy, urine cytology is one of the gold-standard examinations for the detection and monitoring of NMIBC, especially those that are high-grade. Urine cytology has a high sensitivity for the detection of high-grade tumour cells (with a sensitivity of more than 90% in the detection of CIS [6

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]) but has a low sensitivity for low-grade tumours. Positive urine cytology may indicate the presence of a tumour anywhere in the urinary tract. While a negative cytology does not rule out the presence of a tumour.

Since December 2015, a new world classification of urine cytology has been published [7

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. The need for a consensus on the terminology for urine cytology results had become indispensable, especially since the terms positive or negative cytology are inadequate. The following terminology should be used (PARIS 2015 classification):

 

Material satisfactory or unsatisfactory for assessment (specify the cause)
Negative cytology (negative for high-grade urothelial carcinoma)
Presence of atypical urothelial cells
Presence of urothelial cells suggestive of high-grade urothelial carcinoma
High-grade urothelial carcinoma
Low-grade urothelial neoplasia
Other categories (primary and metastatic cancers and other lesions) (#tabr3).

 

Urinary markers

No urinary marker is currently recommended for diagnosis or surveillance in clinical practice [8

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Histological variants

The WHO 2016 classification distinguishes between several types of tumours [9

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]:

 

Urothelial carcinoma (more than 90% of the cases);
Urothelial carcinomas with partial squamous and/or glandular or trophoblastic differentiation;
Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma;
Nested urothelial carcinoma (including large cell) and microcystic urothelial carcinoma ;
Plasmocytoid, giant cell or signet-ring cell carcinoma;
Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma;
Small cell carcinomas;
Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma;

There are other extremely rare variants which are not described.

Some variants of urothelial carcinoma (micropapillary, plasmocytoid, sarcomatoid) have a worse prognosis than pure urothelial carcinoma [10

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

For urothelial carcinomas that do not have exclusively urothelial differentiation, variants should be reported in %.

The presence of lymphovascular invasion (or lymphovascular emboli) in TURBT specimens were associated with a poor prognosis [11

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] and should be mentioned.

 

Molecular classification

Molecular markers and their prognostic role have been under investigation [12

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. These methods, especially complex approaches such as stratification of patients based on molecular classification, are promising but not yet suitable for routine application.

 

Pathology report

 
TURBT (Table 2)

 

 

NMIBC

 

Initial diagnostic assessment

 
Endoscopy: flexible cystoscopy

Diagnostic cystoscopy is usually performed with a flexible cystoscope under local anaesthesia. Bacteriuria can be detected and treated or might not be detected prior to a diagnostic cystoscopy [13

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. This endoscopy is indicated in case bladder cancer is suspected, when the ultrasound is negative. The sensitivity is then 71% and specificity 72% [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Flexible cystoscopy allows the number, size, topography, and appearance of the tumour and bladder mucosa to be determined. When the patient is referred with an ultrasound that describes BC, diagnostic cystoscopy prior to endoscopic resection is optional. The use of hexaminolevulinate (Hexvix ) blue-light bladder fluorescence or Narrow-Band Imaging in diagnostic cystoscopy significantly improves the detection of tumour lesions (Ta, T1) and in particular carcinoma in situ [14

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 15

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 16

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. However, in case of fluorescence the benefit is less with a flexible cystoscope than with a rigid endoscope. The value of its use during the initial diagnostic endoscopy has not been demonstrated if endoscopic trans urethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT) will be performed with fluorescence.

 
Indication for imaging examinations

 
Urinary tract ultrasound

The effectiveness of ultrasound for diagnosing urothelial tumours in haematuria assessment is moderate with a sensitivity of approximately 63% [17

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] and depends on the patient's morphotype and bladder filling and the operator's experience.

Although CT urography (CTU) should be the first choice, an ultrasound of the urinary tract is sometimes performed in the context of haematuria because of its safety in terms of ionising radiation and contrast medium injection. If that is the case, if the ultrasound does not identify the cause of haematuria, a complementary assessment by CTU +/− cystoscopy should be performed.

 
CT urography

CT urography (CTU) is indicated in haematuria and urothelial tumour assessment when there is a risk of dissemination to the upper urinary tract: trigonal localisation [18

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], high-grade cytology, or multifocal bladder involvement.

It provides an overview of the whole urinary system through several acquisitions taken before and after contrast media is injected and should include a study in the excretory phase of contrast medium elimination. The use of a protocol with furosemide (Lasilix*) injection and a double injection of contrast medium (split bolus) is recommended to improve the performance of the examination and reduce patient irradiation [19

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

The accuracy of CTU in the detection of urothelial bladder lesions varies according to the studies with sensitivity of 64-95% and specificity of 83-99% [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
MR urography

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Urography also makes it possible to examine the whole urinary tract and is a worthwhile alternative to CTU, especially if CTU is contraindicated [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 21

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

The particular value of MRI is the contribution of functional imaging sequences, especially diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), which significantly improve the performance of the examination. The sensitivity and specificity of diffusion sequences for the detection of bladder lesions are 95% and 85% respectively [22

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 23

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

In the bladder stage, MRI also appears to assess the risk of invasion of the muscle layer [24

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 25

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Recommendations for the performance, interpretation and standardisation of bladder MRI reports were published in 2018 as VI-RADS (Vesical Imaging-Reporting and Data System) [26

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. When the waiting period for the examination does not delay patient management, it is advisable to perform this multiparametric bladder MRI prior to the resection procedure to optimise disease evaluation (#tabr4) [27

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 28

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 29

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 30

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 31

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Turbt

 
Technical principles and qualitative criteria for TURBT

The diagnosis of BC depends primarily on the histological examination of the entire resected lesion. It is recommended to perform a urine culture beforehand to eliminate urinary tract infection [32

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Mapping of the lesions should specify the number of tumours, their topography in relation to the prostatic urethra and ureteral orifices, their size and their appearance (pedicled or sessile). The resection should be complete and deep (presence of bundles of the detrusor muscle). The absence of muscle on the resection chips is associated with a significantly higher risk of residual disease and early recurrence in case of pT1 and/or high-grade tumours [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. TURBT should be performed en bloc, whenever possible, with underlying detrusor to improve tumour analysis and possibly the quality of the resection with a reduced risk of tumour recurrence [33

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 34

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 35

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. The reference resection technique is monopolar electrocautery. Resection by bipolar electrocautery and laser enucleation are technical alternatives [36

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 37

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Randomised biopsies of optically healthy mucosa have no demonstrated value when conducted routinely, as the probability of detecting associated carcinoma in situ is very low (< 2%). However, they are indicated in case of positive urine cytology without visible lesions, or in case of optically abnormal areas suggestive of carcinoma in situ [38

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. After resection, the meta-analysis of 4 phase III studies that compared continuous saline irrigation up to the 18th hour with early postoperative instillation of IVC with MMC showed no difference in the prophylactic effect on the recurrence of NMIBC [39

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Use of visual optimisation techniques

 
Blue light fluorescence cystoscopy

When available, hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy is recommended for the first resection (diagnostic tool) of NMIBC and to identify CIS [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. It has shown a significant increase in tumour detection rate (at the cost of a certain rate of false positives) and lengthening of the free interval without recurrence. A cost-effectiveness study applied to the French system showed a QALY (economic indicator aimed at estimating the value of life) gain with the use of hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy from the first TURBT of any NMIBC (#tabr5) [41

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Narrow-Band Imaging (NBI)

When available, NBI is recommended for TURBT. A meta-analysis of the results of 6 studies on the use of optical magnification by NBI for TURBT showed a benefit in reducing the risk of tumour recurrence at 3 months and 1 and 2 years [42

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Due to the quality of the data from these studies it was not possible to specify which patients benefit from resection with NBI and the methodology of the 5 randomised trials included in the meta-analysis induced biases in favour of better tumour detection in the arms treated with NBI.

 
Indication for early postoperative intravesical chemotherapy (IVCT)

Early postoperative IVCT with mitomycin C (MMC) or epirubicin is a treatment option after TURBT, unless contraindicated (haematuria and bladder perforation) [43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Considering the possibility of serious complications, although rare, (bladder necrosis), the risk-benefit ratio for the patient should always be carefully assessed. Early postoperative IVCT should ideally be administered within the first 2 hours or, at the latest, within 24 hours after TURBT. Urine alkalinisation is required for MMC but not for epirubicin. Early postoperative IVCT could reduce the risk of tumour recurrence at 1 and 5 years by 35% and 14% respectively [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. A meta-analysis of individual data from 2,278 patients included in studies on the use of early postoperative IVCT (MMC, gemcitabine or pirarubicin) showed a 32% benefit in reducing the risk of subsequent recurrence after resection of NMIBC with an EORTC score < 5 [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]:

 

a maximum of 7 tumours, < 3 cm and presumed to be pTa G ≤ 2 or T1 G1LG
a single tumour ≥ 3 cm and presumed to be pTa G ≤ 2 or T1 G1LG

Urine cytology is used to exclude the presence of a high-grade tumour. Therefore, early postoperative IVCT with MMC is recommended after the first resection of initial NMIBC.

 
Indication for a revaluation TURBT (so-called « second look »)

A second look TURBT within 2-6 weeks after an estimated complete TURBT is recommended only in case of stage pT1 tumour.

An additional TURBT should be performed in case of:

 

absence of muscle identified on the initial resection specimen (except in the case of low grade pTa).
or large volume and/or multifocal tumour (incomplete resection);

The objective of this endoscopic and histological re-evaluation is to reduce the risk of residual disease, enable more accurate staging of the tumour, improve patient selection for intravesical therapy (and therefore response), reduce the frequency of recurrence and delay tumour progression (#tabr6) [45

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Additional arguments are provided in appendix 1.

 

Prognostic classification

Treatment of NMIBC depends on the risk of recurrence, progression and failure of tumour treatment after initial complete resection in one or more stages (Figure 2). The risk assessment can be performed using the EORTC [46

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] or CUETO [47

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] tables but none are unanimously accepted or used by the urological community because of the overestimation of the risk of recurrence and progression and because their use is not well suited to clinical practice. An updated stratification has been established in Table 3.

 
Figure 2
Figure 2. 

Algorithm for NMIBC management.

 
Low-risk tumours

They correspond to low-grade, unifocal, pTa urothelial carcinoma of less than 3 cm with no history of bladder tumour. They have a low risk of recurrence and progression. Apart from early postoperative IVCT, it requires no additional treatment [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Intermediate risk tumours

They are consistent with all other low-grade pTa urothelial carcinomas that meet none of the high or very high risk criteria. These tumours have a low risk of progression but a high risk of recurrence. Their treatment involves intra-vesical instillations by chemotherapy [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] or BCG treatment with maintenance for 1 year [54

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] to decrease the risk of recurrence. BCG is more effective in reducing the risk of recurrence, but because of its lower tolerability profile and the low risk of progression, MMC is usually offered in first-line and BCG in case of failure [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
High-risk tumours

They have at least one of the following risk factors: pT1 stage, high grade or the presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS). These tumours have a high risk of recurrence and progression. Their treatment involves intravesical instillations with BCG treatment with maintenance for 3 years [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références,48

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Very high-risk tumours

They have a high risk of progression (around 20%) and of early progression, either because the probability of complete eradication before treatment is low, or because they are very aggressive, have a high risk of intravesical therapy failure or there is a risk of lymph node involvement as early as the pT1 stage [49

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

These are tumours with all the risk factors (high-grade pT1 with Cis), tumours with lymphovascular invasion and tumours that are non-urothelial or have aggressive pathological forms. Also considered at very high risk are high-risk tumours that have not been resected or that persist after first-line treatment (BCG induction). BCG treatment and first-line cystectomy may be proposed to treat them after discussing the morbidity associated with the procedure with the patient [50

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] (#tabr7).

 

Adjuvant intravesical therapies

Adjuvant therapy aims to reduce the risk of recurrence for intermediate tumours, and of progression for high-risk tumours. Incompleteness of the resection is the most significant risk factor for failure. This is more often the case when the muscle has not been seen, the tumour size is > 3 cm or the tumour is multifocal. Conversely, the rate of recurrence or progression after intravesical therapy is minimal when a « second look » TURBT shows no tumour or only low-grade pTa lesions [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Intravesical chemotherapy

 
Mitomycin C (MMC)

The standard treatment is 8 weekly instillations of 40 mg in 40 ml of normal saline solution (1 mg/ml), which may or may not be followed by monthly instillations for up to 1 year (maintenance therapy). The effectiveness of MMC is correlated with the contact time between the product and the urothelium. A minimum instillation time of one hour is required [51

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. MMC with maintenance reduces the risk of recurrence by 30% compared to maintenance-free BCG instillations.

 
Epirubicin

In the context of a shortage of mitomycin C, in November 2019, the French Urology Association Cancer Committee suggested to the French National Agency for Drug Safety (ANSM) to use epirubicin as an alternative chemotherapy agent. Epirubicin has demonstrated efficacy and is used in many countries for indications equivalent to those for mitomycin C [52

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. For epirubicin, the standard treatment is 8 weekly instillations of 50 mg (instillation) in 25 to 50 ml of normal saline solution (1 to 2 mg/ml). In case of local toxicity (drug-induced cystitis), a dose reduction of up to 30 mg is recommended. For carcinoma in situ, depending on individual patient tolerability, the dose may be increased to up to 80 mg.

 
Thermochemotherapy

Thermochemotherapy is a treatment that is currently being evaluated. This treatment modality uses a device that maintains MMC at 40-44°C for the entire duration of the instillation (1 hour). Epirubicin has not been evaluated with these techniques. When available, this modality may be proposed for intermediate-risk NMIBC after failure of MMC and BCG, or for high-risk NMIBC if BCG is unavailable or in the event of intolerability, refusal or ineligibility for radical surgery, but with inferior oncologic outcomes [53

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 54

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 55

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Optimisation of instillations and prevention of side effects

The effectiveness of MMC and epirubicin depends on how they are used and the concentrations. MMC instillations at a dose of 2 mg/ml are more effective but less well tolerated and are not offered as first-line therapy. The same goes for instillations of epirubicin 80 mg/50 ml. It is recommended [43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]:

 

to reduce diuresis 8 hours before instillation;
for MMC, alkalinise urine (pH > 6).

After instillation, for each micturition that occurs within 6 hours, the discarded urine should be neutralised with 200 ml of ready-to-use bleach. The first micturition after instillation, within the first two hours, will take place at the place of instillation. Other micturition should normally take place at the patient's home.

 
Intravesical BCG treatment

 
Administration modality

BCG is started only after bladder healing, usually 2-4 weeks after resection and no later than 6 weeks and in the absence of any residual tumour. The induction treatment consists of 6 weekly intravesical instillations, ideally of 2 hours each. Maintenance treatment is recommended in all cases and consists of 3 weekly instillations at 3, 6 and 12 months from resection for intermediate-risk tumours (one-year maintenance) continued every 6 months until the 36th month for high-risk tumours (3-year maintenance) [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Contraindications

BCG should not be administered in the following cases:

 
Strict contraindications

 

History of systemic BCG reaction (organ infection or BCG sepsis)
Severe immune deficiency
Radiation cystitis
Active tuberculosis

 
Relative contraindications

 

Side effects related to the previous instillation that persist at the time of the new instillation (stage 3)
Symptomatic urinary tract infection
Absence or uncertainty of urothelial integrity (macroscopic haematuria, traumatic catheterisation, or 2 to 4 weeks after lower urinary tract procedures)

Studies with small samples of patients have reported no increase in side effects but sustained efficacy in case of a history of radiation therapy in the bladder area without radiation cystitis, or in case of moderate immune deficiency (immunosuppressive therapy, HIV with well-controlled viral load). In the absence of therapeutic alternatives, it is recommended to add maximum prophylactic measures that can be adapted to the observed tolerability (Stage 2) [43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Microscopic haematuria, leukocyturia, and asymptomatic bacteriuria are not contraindications to BCG instillations and do not require treatment [56

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Prevention and management of side effects

The management of side effects is based on the opinions of expert groups (IBCG, CCAFU) and should be adapted to the severity [57

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. A distinction is made (Table 4) between minor side effects for which continuation of BCG is possible, subject to the implementation of symptomatic, prophylactic measures or temporary interruption of BCG, and major side effects for which cessation of BCG is most often permanent. In addition to questioning, it is recommended that a checklist or self-questionnaire be used before each instillation to assess side effects.

The minor side effects (Table 5) can be classified into 3 stages of severity on which their management depends.

The major side effects correspond to stage 4 severity side effects. They are usually secondary to systemic absorption of BCG. If symptoms suggestive of these conditions are present, instillations should be discontinued and hospitalisation and specialised management should be considered. Treatment usually includes high-dose corticosteroid therapy and tuberculosis antibiotic therapy.

Persistent haematuria or isolated urinary signs that are resistant to treatment should raise suspicion of tumour recurrence or complication and a cystoscopy should be considered. Corticosteroids are usually administered over a period of less than 15 days, until symptoms disappear. BCG instillations are ineffective in cases of macroscopically incomplete resection. The different BCG strains are not genomically similar. Only one randomised study supported the notion of a slight superiority of the Connaught strain over the Tice strain. However, the limitations of the study prevent choosing one strain over another at present (#tabr8).

 

NMIBC surveillance

NMIBC surveillance is essential because the risk of recurrence is high. Surveillance modalities are based on retrospective studies and expert opinions (Table 6) [58

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Low-risk NMIBC: recurrences in this group are almost always low-grade tumours with almost no risk of progression.

Intermediate risk NMIBC: this group is characterised by a high risk of recurrence but a low risk of progression. Factors associated with recurrence are, in decreasing order of importance: multifocality, recurrence rate > 1 per year and size > 3 cm. The risk can be calculated using the EORTC tables [46

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

High-risk NMIBC: the risk of progression is particularly high in the first two years when surveillance is required on a quarterly basis. The frequency then gradually decreases.

 
Cystoscopy and biopsies

Surveillance is mainly based on cystoscopy, which cannot be replaced by any other diagnostic modality. Cystoscopy at 3 months is essential and plays an important prognostic role in ensuring that there is no failure to recognise treatment-resistant tumours. Routine biopsies together with cystoscopy are recommended at 3 months when CIS is present at diagnosis, to verify the efficacy of BCG treatment. They are also to be performed in case of suspicious lesions on cystoscopy, except in case of low-risk tumours where electrofulguration is possible. After 5 years, recurrences of low-risk NMIBC are rare or present a low level of threat and cystoscopic surveillance may be discontinued. Intermediate-risk NMIBC rarely progresses after 10 years, and surveillance may be discontinued or less invasive modalities such as ultrasound may be used. Surveillance is continued for life for high-risk NMIBC, or when the patient continues to smoke. Figure 3 summarises the surveillance schedule according to risk. The use of blue light (Hexvix ) fluorescence in combination with flexible cystoscopy for surveillance is not recommended [59].

 
Figure 3
Figure 3. 

Schedule for intravesical therapy and MIBC surveillance according to the risk group.

 
Urine cytology and markers

Urine cytology is useful to diagnose high-grade tumours. Low-risk NMIBCs rarely progress to such tumours. Therefore, cytology surveillance is unnecessary in this group. However, for the other groups it is systematically associated with cystoscopy. Isolated positive urine cytology should be checked for carcinoma in situ or upper urinary tract tumour. No other urinary markers are currently recommended for surveillance [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Imaging

The risk of subsequent upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) in patients managed for bladder tumour is approximately 5% during follow-up. The main risk factors are high-grade tumours, and trigonal and multifocal involvement [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. For these at-risk patients, CTU as part of surveillance should be on an annual basis.

Regardless of the risk group, if clinical symptoms or biological signs suggestive of upper urinary tract involvement appear, CTU is recommended [60

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

The entire urinary system can also be described by MRI and it is an alternative to CTU, especially if CTU is contrain-dicated or in case of repeated examinations, to reduce exposure to radiation (#tabr9) [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Treatment of NMIBC recurrences

 
Recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as low risk

 
Technical principles

 
The place of active surveillance

Active surveillance may be offered as an option to patients with recurrence after more than 1 year of follow-up of low-grade pTa NMIBC, no more than 5 tumours, size ≤ 1 cm, negative urine cytology, and who understand the need for a stringent surveillance (compliance) [61

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 62

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 63

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
The place of fulguration

The standard surgical treatment is TURBT. It should be associated with a second look in case of incomplete resection, absence of muscle (except for Ta low grade or G1) or in case of pT1. Considering that there are no randomised controlled trials, fulguration may be proposed as a surgical option for the treatment of low-risk papillary recurrences of NMIBC (less than 5 tumours; size < 0.5cm) to decrease the perioperative risks [64

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 65

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 66

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
The place of visual optimisation

Hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy is recommended in TURBT for recurrences of NMIBC that initially had a low risk. The use of blue light fluorescence associated with white light improves the detection of NMIBC recurrences. This technique improves relapse-free survival [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
The place of early postoperative intravesical chemotherapy

It may be recommended after TURBT for initially low-risk recurrences of NMIBC, under certain conditions. A metaanalysis of individual data from 2,278 patients included in studies on the use of early postoperative IVCT (mitomycin, gemcitabine or pirarubicin) showed a benefit in reducing the risk of subsequent recurrence only in case of recurrence [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] :

 

single
size < 3 cm
assumed to be low-grade or G1-2 (negative urine cytology)
after one year of remission (period of more than 1 year without recurrence)
and the absence of contraindications (bladder perforation, macroscopic haematuria, extensive resection).

 
Adjuvant therapy for resection

The adjuvant therapy depends on the stage and grade of recurrence.

 
Recurrence in the form of an intermediate-risk NMIBC

The available adjuvant therapies are:

 

Intravesical chemotherapy (8 instillations per week) with maintenance treatment. The ideal maintenance treatment modalities are not clearly defined. it would appear that a treatment duration of more than one year is not justified [3].
BCG instillations with maintenance treatment for 1 year (induction - 6 weekly + maintenance - 3 weekly at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) [3].

 
Recurrence in the form of a high risk NMIBC

In this form of recurrence, intravesical BCG instillations are recommended (6 instillations weekly and 3 weekly at 3, 6 and 12 months, then every 6 months for 3 years) [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as intermediate risk

 
Technical principles

 
The place of active surveillance

Active surveillance may be offered as an option to respondent patients with recurrence after more than 1 year of follow-up of low-grade pTa NMIBC, no more than 5 tumours, size ≤ 1 cm, normal urine cytology, and who agree to closer monitoring [61

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 62

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 63

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
The place of fulguration

When TURBT cannot be considered due to the patient's fragility and co-morbidities, fulguration may be proposed as a surgical option for the treatment of non-symptomatic low-risk papillary recurrences of NMIBC (less than 5 tumours; size < 0.5cm) [64

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 65

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 66

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
The place of visual optimisation

It is not systematically recommended in TURBT for recurrences of NMIBC that initially had an intermediate risk.

Blue light fluorescence improved the detection of Ta lesions and relapse-free survival in the low-risk group of NMIBC (see section 4.1.1.2). Therefore, it is recommended for use only for recurrences of sizes < 3 cm and presumed to be Ta and Low Grade /G1 (negative urine cytology) [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
The place of early postoperative intravesical chemotherapy

It is not systematically recommended after TURBT for recurrences of NMIBC that initially had an intermediate risk.

According to the latest meta-analysis [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], early postoperative IVCT has a benefit of reducing the risk of subsequent recurrence only in case of recurrence:

 

single
size < 3 cm
assumed to be low-grade or G1-2 (negative urine cytology)
after one year of remission (period of more than 1 year without recurrence)
and the absence of contraindications (bladder perforation, macroscopic haematuria, extensive resection).

 
Adjuvant therapy for resection

The adjuvant therapy depends on the stage and grade of recurrence.

 
Recurrence in the form of an intermediate-risk NMIBC

The available adjuvant therapies are:

 

Intravesical chemotherapy with maintenance treatment in the absence of a previous prescription. The ideal modalities of maintenance treatment are not clearly defined, but it would appear that the duration should not exceed 1 year [3].
BCG instillations with maintenance treatment for 1 year (induction - 6 weekly + maintenance - 3 weekly at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) [3,48].

 
Recurrence in the form of a high risk NMIBC

In the absence of criteria for aggressiveness (stage pT1, High Grade/G3 + CIS, histological variant with poor prognosis) that could indicate early cystectomy, treatment with intravesical BCG instillations is recommended (6 weekly then 3 weekly at 3, 6 and 12 months and then every 6 months for 3 years) [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références,43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Recurrence in the form of a very high risk NMIBC

The prognosis for these tumours calls for BCG treatment, and cystectomy should be suggested to the patient after a discussing about the morbidity associated with the procedure. Ideally, it should be proposed before progression to MIBC [50

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as high risk

 
Technical principles

 
The place of visual optimisation

Blue light fluorescence is recommended to improve the detection of flat CIS lesions when white light cystoscopy does not reveal papillary lesions. It detects 26.7% more lesions than white light alone and improves relapse-free survival. However, blue light fluorescence has not improved the detection of high-risk papillary lesions and has not reduced their risk of recurrence [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Early post-operative intravesical chemotherapy

It is not recommended in TURBT for recurrences of NMIBC that initially had a high risk [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Adjuvant therapy for resection

The treatment of recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as high-risk and treated with adjuvant BCG should be distinguished according to how early the recurrence occurred and its histological grade:

 
Early recurrence ≤ 12 months in the form of low grade NMIBC

A low grade recurrence is not considered as failure of BCG. A retrospective study showed that low-grade recurrences at 3 months of BCG induction treatment had a low risk of progression. Therefore, conservative treatment can be considered with a new cycle of intravesical instillations with BCG or chemotherapy [67

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Early recurrence ≤ 12 months in the form of high grade NMIBC

According to the same retrospective study, recurrence of high-grade lesions (pTa, pT1) at 3 months of BCG induction treatment had a risk of recurrence and progression of 62% and 17% at 1 year. Although these data are reported in the absence of BCG maintenance treatment and/or a 2nd induction cycle, conservative treatment is not recommended in early high-grade recurrences [67

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. In these situations, radical cystectomy provides a 5-year survival of between 80 and 90%. When a decision has been made for radical treatment, it should be implemented without delay (within three months), as the risk of bladder disease progression is high. Conservative treatments by intravesical instillations or intravesical thermochemotherapy are considered as possible alternatives in case of refusal or ineligibility for radical surgery, but with inferior oncological outcomes [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références,68

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Late recurrence > 12 months in the form of low grade NMIBC

A low grade late recurrence is not considered as failure of BCG. A new cycle of intravesical BCG instillations or chemotherapy may be considered.

 
Late recurrence > 12 months in the form of high grade NMIBC

During the first episode of recurrence, a conservative alternative (intravesical BCG instillations) may be proposed provided that the second-look TURBT does not identify a tumour or only low-grade lesions. Radical cystectomy may be offered to patients with late high-grade recurrence (#tabr10).

 
Isolated CIS

 
The place of blue light fluorescence

Blue light fluorescence is recommended to improve the detection of recurrent CIS lesions. CIS detection rate (91-97% vs. 23-68%) and relapse-free survival were improved by the use of blue light vs. white light alone [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Treatment of recurrent isolated CIS

Endoscopic treatment of CIS should be supplemented with intravesical BCG instillations. An endoscopic reassessment is then recommended at 3 months with blue light fluorescence-sensitised biopsies.

If CIS lesions persist, it is recommended to perform a 2nd cycle of BCG induction followed by a new endoscopic reassessment at 3 months with blue light fluorescence-sensitised biopsies [69

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. It is recommended to eliminate any urethral and/or upper urinary tract lesion that is the cause of the recurrence [70

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

If after these two cycles of induction, CIS is found on bladder biopsies, this denotes BCG failure and a radical cystectomy is indicated [71

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. When a decision is made to perform a cystectomy, this should be done without delay (3 months). In case of refusal or ineligibility for cystectomy, a new BCG induction cycle or inclusion in a clinical trial may be proposed.

 

MIBC

MIBC management is summarised in the flowchart in Figure 4.

 
Figure 4
Figure 4. 

MIBC management decision tree.

“fit” patient: creatinine clearance ≥60 ml/min and PS < 2

“unfit” patient: creatinine clearance <60 ml/min or PS ≥ 2

NAC = neoadjuvant chemotherapy; AC = adjuvant chemotherapy

 

Imaging assessment

 
CT TAP with urine excretion time

 

CTU with iodinated contrast medium injection and late excretory phase along with chest CT is the reference examination for the assessment of the extension of the MIBC.
The efficacy of CTU for local staging (invasion of perivesical fat and/or adjacent organs) varies between 55 and 92% in different studies [72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77].
Lymph node (N) staging by CTU is based solely on morphological criteria, including short node axes, and does not allow the diagnosis of micro-metastases. Therefore, the sensitivity of CT scan for the detection of lymph node spread is low, varying according to the studies between 30 and 53% with a specificity between 68 and 100% [78, 79, 80, 81].

 
Multiparametric bladder MRI

 

The performance of MRI for local T-staging of bladder tumour is clearly superior to CTU and makes it possible to differentiate between superficial and infiltrating tumours with pooled sensitivities of 84-92% and pooled specificities of 79-91% [82, 83, 84, 85]. The most recent data on the diagnostic performances of bladder MRI are summarised in appendix 2.
Multiparametric bladder MRI prior to resection is desirable for the evaluation of any bladder tumour if the waiting period for the examination does not delay patient management [86, 87, 88, 90].

 
Bone scintigraphy

Secondary bone localisations are not systematically Identified but this should be done in the presence of suggestive clinical symptoms [91

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 92

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
PET (positron emission tomography)

 

Currently there is no place for PET-CT in the staging of muscle invasive bladder cancers outside of clinical studies [92, 93, 94, 95].
PET performances in detecting lymph nodes in MIBC prior to cystectomy are equivalent to conventional imaging with sensitivity in the range of 56-57% and specificity of approximately 92-95% [96, 97].
In certain patients at significant risk for metastasis, FDG PET-CT can be considered after validation at a multi-disciplinary team meeting, considering that sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 89% respectively were noted for the detection of distant metastases in a recent meta-analysis, [98].

 
Brain CT scan

 

Secondary brain localisations are not systematically identified but this should be done in the presence of suggestive clinical symptoms [92].
Cerebral MRI and whole body MRI are possible alternatives to CT scans, especially in case of contraindications (#tabr11).

 

Localised MIBC (T2-T3 N0 M0) management

The management of localised MIBC is based on local treatment, ideally preceded by neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

For non-urothelial histology (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma), the recommendations are different and are summarised in appendix 3.

 
Neoadjuvant therapy

 

The objectives of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are as follows:
â—¦
to eradicate micro-metastases and avoid the implantation of circulating tumour cells at the time of surgery
â—¦
to reduce the size of the tumour and facilitate the surgical procedure
â—¦
to prolong patient survival [99, 100].
It is recommended for patients who are able to receive cisplatin-based polychemotherapy, i.e.:
â—¦
Patients with creatinine clearance greater than 60 ml/min
AND
â—¦
WHO-PS 0 or 1 patients
For patients with renal function between 50 and 60 ml/min, the indication for neoadjuvant chemotherapy can be discussed on a case-by-case basis in a MTM.
In case of patients said to be « unfit » for optimal neoadjuvant chemotherapy because of impaired renal function, poor general health, or age that does not allow the use of an optimal protocol, cystectomy alone is indicated.
A reassessment by CT TAP is recommended after the last course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to ensure that there is no progression and to validate the indication for cystectomy. In case of T3-T4 tumour, a CT scan evaluation is an option after the first two chemotherapy courses.

Approximately ten therapeutic trials are under way to evaluate the place of immunotherapy as a neoadjuvant therapy, alone or in combination in these patients, whether they are cisplatin-fit or unfit (clinicaltrials.gov ) (appendix 4).

 
Surgical treatment: cystectomy

 
Indications and time limit

 

Cystectomy preceded by neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard curative treatment [99, 100].
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (or radical cystectomy in the absence of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy) should be offered within an optimal time frame of less than 8 weeks and no more than 12 weeks after the diagnosis of MIBC [101+102].
When neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been administered, surgical management should be performed within 10 to 12 weeks after the last chemotherapy course [103, 104].

 
Technical aspects

 
Approaches:

 

Cystectomy can be performed by open approach, simple laparoscopy or robot-assisted cystectomy.
The open and minimally invasive approaches using a simple laparoscopic or robot-assisted approach are oncologically equivalent [105, 106, 107, 108, 109].
For very large or locally advanced tumours, the open approach should be used.
There is an advantage to the minimally invasive approach in terms of blood loss with a comparable complication rate [110, 111].

 
Surgical technique

 

An evaluation of patients' sexual function is recommended in order to adapt the surgical technique (IIEF-5 for men, FSFI for women).
Under no circumstances should the preservation of sexuality compromise the oncological quality of surgery.
In men: A radical cystoprostatectomy including excision of the prostate and seminal vesicles is recommended. The nerves and genitalia can be preserved in select patients (patients with localised disease (cT2), away from the bladder neck, prostate or prostatic urethra) [112].
In women: An anterior pelvic exenteration, whereby the bladder, uterus and anterior aspect of the vagina are removed, is recommended. The nerves and genitalia can be preserved in select patients (patients with localised tumour (cT2), away from the bladder neck, the trigone or the posterior surface) [.

 
Extemporaneous examinations:

 

Examining ureteral sections is not routinely recommended. It should be performed in cases of hydronephrosis, multifocal tumour or associated CIS [114, 115].
An extemporaneous examination of the urethral section (selective, to facilitate pathological analysis) is recommended when enterocystoplasty is envisaged or when there is doubt about the indication for urethrectomy.

 
Ureter:

 

Urethrectomy is recommended in case of positive urethral margins, massive invasion of the prostatic urethra in men, invasion of the bladder neck or urethra in women.
Urethrectomy can be performed at the same time or at a later date [116].

 
Lymphadenectomy

 

Extensive pelvic lymphadenectomy, including the obturator, external iliac, internal iliac, and distal primary iliac regions up to the common iliac bifurcation, is recommended during cystectomy [117, 118].
There is no oncological benefit in taking the lymphadenectomy up to the aortic bifurcation [119].

 
Urinary diversion

 

The choice of urinary diversion method should be made in agreement with the duly informed patient. In the absence of contraindications, enterocystoplasty should be systematically proposed in both men and women.
Trans-ileal Bricker-type cutaneous ureterostomy and enterocystoplasty are the preferred urinary diversion methods.
In case of enterocystoplasty, nerve and genitalia preservation is associated with improved continence in both men [120] and women [121].
Strict contraindications to performing an enterocystoplasty are:
â—¦
invasion of the urethra (or bladder neck in women)
â—¦
impaired cognitive functions and psychiatric disorders
â—¦
an inflammatory bowel disease
â—¦
a history of high-dose pelvic irradiation
â—¦
the presence of advanced renal insufficiency (<50 ml/min)
â—¦
the patient has a short life expectancy.
In addition, there are relative contraindications:
â—¦
age >75 years (due to low continence scores)
â—¦
foreseeable difficulties in compliance or management of enterocystoplasty
â—¦
anatomical difficulties.
In case of contraindication to enterocystoplasty due to tumour invasion of the urethra, an external continent urinary diversion may be discussed, for patients capable of self-catheterising.
Bilateral cutaneous ureterostomy should be avoided and reserved for palliative cystectomy or when the patient's condition does not permit another diversion method.

 
Standard pathology report (Appendix 5)

 

The standard pathology report should include a Macroscopy section and a Histology section.
The presence of histological variants should be specified.
Molecular classifications are promising, and a consensus seems to have been reached [122], but they are not yet adapted to clinical practice.

 
Preoperative and postoperative optimisation

 

Inclusion of all patients in an ERAS (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) protocol is recommended, according to the French Urology Association protocol [123].
The goal of ERAS is to reduce the rate of postoperative complications and reduce patients' length of stay [124, 125].
All the recommended technical measures are detailed in Table 7.
In general, perioperative optimisation requires the implementation of a well-defined patient pathway.
An oncogeriatric evaluation is recommended for patients with a G8 score ≤14 [126].

 
Trimodal treatment (TMT)

 

TMT is a curative bladder preservation treatment that can be offered in the following cases [127, 128]:
â—¦
Unifocal tumour
â—¦
Maximum - stage T2
â—¦
Absence of CIS
â—¦
Absence of hydronephrosis
â—¦
Complete resection possible
â—¦
and in the absence of major functional bladder impairment
â—¦
in well-informed compliant patients (strict monitoring).
Oncological findings are identical to those for cystectomy in patients who meet these selection criteria [129, 130, 131, 132].
Apart from these indications, TMT may be offered as a therapeutic alternative to radical cystectomy in patients who are ineligible for surgery because of their co-morbidities. In that case oncological findings are inferior to those for cystectomy [133, 134, 135].
TMT is a combination of:
â—¦
local treatment by transurethral resection of the bladder (at best complete, if not the maximum)
â—¦
followed by external radiotherapy (with preference given to IMRT and IGRT techniques) [136, 137]
â—¦
and concomitant radiosensitising (potentiating) chemotherapy, based on cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil + Mitomycin C, or gemcitabine [138, 139, 140, 141].
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not routinely recommended in select patients, but may be offered on a case-by-case basis and in the same manner as before local surgical treatment [129,130,142].
Post-TMT surveillance is based on urine cytology, cystoscopy, CT TAP, every 3 months for 2 years, then every 6 months up to 5 years, then yearly for life.
In case of recurrence after TMT:
â—¦
if non-invasive: a conservative treatment can be proposed according to the same modalities as a NMIBC from the outset (resection +/− instillations) [139]. Cystectomy may also be discussed.
â—¦
if invasive: a salvage cystectomy should be proposed (#tabr12)

 
Adjuvant therapies

 
Adjuvant chemotherapy

The use of postoperative chemotherapy is still being debated, as no trial has the robustness to confirm the value [143

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 144

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Adjuvant chemotherapy may be indicated for: patients who have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, in case of a tumour at high risk for recurrence based on pathology analysis data, and in particular: stages pT3 and pT4, N+ lymph node status, positive surgical margins [145], when the risk/benefit ratio is assessed and only if renal function allows the use of cisplatin.
For patients with renal function between 50 and 60 ml/min, the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy can be discussed on a case-by-case basis in a MTM (#tabr13).

 
Adjuvant radiotherapy

Adjuvant radiotherapy is currently being evaluated in clinical trials in pT3-T4 and/or pN+ patients [146

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 147

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Therapeutic alternatives

 
Partial cystectomy

 

It can be proposed in case of:
â—¦
primary unifocal lesion on a mobile portion of the bladder more than 2 cm from the cervix and trigone, absence of CIS, size ≤ 4 cm, maximum T3a stage
â—¦
intradiverticular tumour [148]
â—¦
urachal adenocarcinoma [149]
It should be associated with lymphadenectomy in the same manner as during radical cystectomy [150].
The approach may be open or minimally invasive [151, 152].

 
Radiotherapy alone

 

Radiotherapy alone for curative purposes:
â—¦
Limited efficacy when not combined with sensitising chemotherapy [138, 139].
â—¦
Discussed only in case of contraindication to radical surgery and contraindication to chemotherapy.
Palliative haemostatic radiotherapy:
â—¦
Good initial efficacy, but modest over time (median 3 to 6 months) [153].
â—¦
Discussed in case of contraindication to anaesthesia or failure of endoscopic haemostasis and in case of a short life expectancy.

 
Palliative surgery

 

Repeat TURBT may be offered to patients who are not eligible for cystectomy or trimodal therapy and who have a short life expectancy.
Palliative cystectomy is not recommended as a first-line procedure, except in cases of major micturition disorders or uncontrolled blood cell loss due to haematuria (i.e. after failure of haemostatic strategies: palliative resection, haemostatic radiation therapy, arterial embolization [154, 155, 156]).
Pain is not an indication for palliative cystectomy and should be managed with appropriate multimodal analgesia.
Obstruction of the upper urinary tract is not an indication for palliative cystectomy and calls for palliative urinary diversion without any bladder procedure (nephrostomy, ureterostomy).

 

Management of MIBC with lymph node spread (T2-T4 N+ M0)

 
Induction chemotherapy and re-evaluation

 

Patients with initial lymph node involvement on CT scan have a much more restricted prognosis, especially since there is retroperitoneal involvement (versus pelvic involvement alone) [157].
A multimodal approach can be proposed, with first-line chemotherapy, with 5-year survival ranging from 10 to 59% [158].
Induction chemotherapy is not neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and post-chemotherapy management should be discussed on a case-by-case basis, according to tumour extension and therapeutic response.

 
The place of surgery

 

Total cystectomy with lymphadenectomy should be offered to completely responsive patients for pelvic adenopathy (cN0) on re-evaluation CT TAP after induction chemotherapy, regardless of residual bladder mass [159].
Cystectomy is not recommended in patients who are cN+ on the post-chemotherapy re-evaluation CT scan. These are patients who are refractory to platinum salts. Management will be the type used in metastatic disease.

 

Treatment and Surveillance of Metastatic MIBC (T2-T4 M+)

 

At the metastatic stage, treatment consists of cisplatin (CDDP) -based chemotherapy with a median survival of 14 to 15 months in patients eligible for this chemotherapy [160].
The choice of treatment should take into account prognostic factors such as altered general health status (SP > 1) and the presence of visceral metastases [161, 162].

 
First line chemotherapy

 

The initial standard protocol for first line treatment in metastatic urothelial carcinomas is M-VAC (Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Adriamycin, and Cisplatin), HD (high dose) MVAC or GC (Gemcitabine-CDDP), with less toxicity for equivalent overall survival for GC [161,163].
For patients considered ineligible (« unfit ») for cisplatin, either because of creatinine clearance < 60 ml/min or because of altered general health status (PS>1), the alternative is carboplatin.
For patients not eligible for polychemotherapy, monochemotherapy with Gemcitabine has moderate efficacy (22-28% objective response and overall survival of 8-12 months) with low toxicity [164].
Patients in very poor general condition (PS 3 or 4) do not benefit from chemotherapy.

Many trials are under way on immunotherapy, either as monotherapy or in combination, for patients fit or unfit for cisplatin.

In the JAVELIN Bladder 100 trial, avelumab (anti-PD-L1) given as maintenance therapy to responders to first-line chemotherapy, provided an overall survival benefit in all patients, regardless of PD-L1 status (21.4 vs. 14.3 months) [Powles T et al. ASCO 2020; Abst LBA1]. Once the drug becomes available, there will be a recommendation to initiate maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy in all patients who are either stable or partially or completely responsive (#tabr14).

 
Second line strategies

 

Pembrolizumab (anti-PD-L1) is recommended as a second line treatment for urothelial carcinoma with a benefit in overall survival compared to chemotherapy (10.3 vs. 7.4 months) [165].
Vinflunine was the first compound to obtain marketing authorisation for this indication, with an overall survival benefit in the eligible population (6.9 vs. 4.3 months). At present, it is no longer included in the supplementary list. Therefore, it is not to be used in current practice [166].
For patients with a good response to cisplatin as first line treatment, with a free interval of more than six months, a new series of HD MVAC is possible in second line [167].

Promising new therapeutic routes are being explored, with anti-FGFRs in patients pre-screened for the presence of genetic alterations (by molecular screening) and also the development of cytotoxic immunoconjugates. The inclusion of patients in a therapeutic trial should be encouraged.

 

MIBC surveillance

 

The reference imaging for MIBC surveillance is CT urography along with CT of the thorax [100168, 169].
In case of contraindications to the use of CTU, MRU along with CT of the thorax without injection is an excellent alternative for surveillance [168,170].
Given the low levels of evidence, 18 FDG PET-CT is not recommended for surveillance or in case of recurrence [100].
Surveillance of renal function is essential regardless of the method of urinary diversion [171].
If the urethra is preserved, surveillance by flexible cystoscopy is recommended. The frequency of surveillance should be adapted to the pathological examination of the cystectomy specimen. Surveillance should be more frequent if there are risk factors for recurrence: invasion of the prostate stroma, multifocality, cervical localisation, and the presence of CIS [168,172].
In case of conservative treatment, regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended [168]. The frequency of follow-up should be adapted to the early stage of the disease (#tabr15).

 

Épidémiologie - Facteurs de risque

Une tumeur de la vessie (TV) est diagnostiquée ou traitée dans le monde chez 2,7 millions de personnes chaque année et elle apparaît après 60 ans dans la majorité des cas [1

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. En France, cette pathologie, avec 13 074 nouveaux cas estimés et 5 335 décès recensés en 2018 dont 80 % chez l'homme, occupe la 4e place en incidence et 7e rang des décès tous cancers confondus (Institut de veille sanitaire [InVs] 2018) et constitue le second cancer urologique après celui de la prostate. Les TV sont responsables de 3 % des décès par cancer. Leur incidence est en augmentation d'environ 1 % par an, avec une croissance plus importante chez la femme que chez l'homme.

La prévention des TV repose sur la lutte active contre son principal facteur de risque, l'intoxication tabagique [2

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La sédentarité, le syndrome métabolique et des apports hydriques supérieurs à 2 L/jour ont également été corrélés à une augmentation du risque de TV [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Dans une population à risque de TV du fait d'une exposition professionnelle antérieure motivant un dépistage ciblé, les recommandations de la Société française de médecine du travail, en collaboration avec la Société française du cancer et l'AFU, préconisent de mettre en place les examens de dépistage 20 ans après le début de l'exposition au cancérogène vésical. Le protocole de surveillance médicale proposé est résumé dans l'algorithme de la Figure 1 (#ntabr1) [4

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Figure 1
Figure 1. 

Stratégie de surveillance médicale pour les professionnels à risque de TV.

 

 

Anatomopathologie

 

Classification Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) (P et yp*)

La dénomination TVNIM est utilisée pour les tumeurs de vessie (TV) n'infiltrant pas le muscle et celle de TVIM en cas d'infiltration tumorale du détrusor. La classification TNM 2017 fait référence (Tableau 1 et #ntabr2) [5

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Cytologie urinaire

La cytologie urinaire est, avec la cystoscopie, un des examens de référence pour la détection et la surveillance des TVNIM, notamment de haut grade. La cytologie urinaire a une sensibilité élevée pour la détection des cellules tumorales de haut grade (avec une sensibilité de plus de 90 % dans la détection du CIS [6

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] mais a une faible sensibilité pour les tumeurs de bas grade. Une cytologie urinaire positive peut indiquer la présence d'une tumeur n'importe où dans la voie excrétrice urinaire. Une cytologie négative n'exclut pas la présence d'une tumeur.

Depuis décembre 2015, une nouvelle classification mondiale de cytologie urinaire a été publiée [7

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La nécessité d'une terminologie consensuelle pour les résultats de la cytologie urinaire était devenue indispensable, notamment car les termes de cytologie positive ou négative sont insuffisants. La terminologie suivante doit être employée (classification de Paris 2015) :

 

matériel satisfaisant ou non satisfaisant pour évaluation (préciser la cause);
cytologie négative (négative pour le carcinome urothélial de haut grade);
présence de cellules urothéliales atypiques;
présence de cellules urothéliales suspectes de carcinome urothélial de haut grade;
carcinome urothélial de haut grade;
néoplasie urothéliale de bas grade;
autres catégories (cancers primitifs et métastatiques et autres lésions) (#ntabr3).

 

Marqueurs urinaires

Aucun marqueur urinaire n'est actuellement recommandé pour une utilisation diagnostique ou de surveillance en pratique clinique [8

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Variants histologiques

La classification OMS 2016 distingue plusieurs types de tumeur [9

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] :

 

carcinome urothélial (plus de 90 % des cas);
carcinome urothélial avec différenciation squameuse et/ou glandulaire ou trophoblastique partielle;
carcinome urothélial micropapillaire;
carcinome urothélial en nids (y compris à grandes cellules) et carcinome urothélial microcystique;
carcinome plasmocytoïde, à cellule géante, à cellule en bague à chaton;
carcinome de type lymphoépithéliome;
carcinome à petites cellules;
carcinome urothélial sarcomatoïde.

Il existe d'autres variantes, extrêmement rares, qui ne sont pas détaillées.

Certains variants de carcinome urothélial (micropapillaire, plasmocytoïde, sarcomatoïde) ont un pronostic plus péjoratif que le carcinome urothélial pur [10

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Pour les carcinomes urothéliaux qui n'ont pas exclusivement une differentiation urothéliale, les variants doivent être rapportés en %.

La présence d'une invasion lymphovasculaire (ou embols lymphovasculaire) dans les échantillons de résection transurétrale de vessie (RTUV) a été associée à un pronostic péjoratif [11

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] et doit être mentionnée.

 

Classification moléculaire

Les marqueurs moléculaires et leur rôle pronostique ont été étudiés [12

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Ces méthodes, en particulier les approches complexes, telles que la stratification des patients basée sur la classification moléculaire, sont prometteuses, mais ne sont pas encore adaptées à une application de routine.

 

Compte-rendu anatomopathologique

 
RTUV (Tableau 2)

 

 

TVNIM

 

Bilan diagnostic initial

 
Endoscopie : fibroscopie vésicale

La cystoscopie diagnostique est habituellement réalisée par fibroscopie sous anesthésie locale. Il est possible de dépister et traiter ou de ne pas dépister les bactériuries avant une cystoscopie diagnostique [13

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Cette endoscopie est indiquée en cas de suspicion de tumeur vésicale, lorsque l'échographie est négative. Sa sensibilité est alors de 71 % et sa spécificité de 72 % [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La fibroscopie permet de préciser le nombre, la taille, la topographie, l'aspect de la tumeur et de la muqueuse vésicale. Lorsque le patient est adressé avec une échographie décrivant une TV, la cystoscopie diagnostique avant la résection endoscopique est optionnelle. L'utilisation de la fluorescence vésicale en lumière bleue par hexaminolévulinate (Hexvix ) ou de l'imagerie en bandes spectrales étroites (Narrow-Band Imaging ) lors de la cystoscopie diagnostique améliore significativement la détection de lésions tumorales (Ta, T1) et plus particulièrement du CIS [14

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 15

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 16

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Dans le cas de la fluorescence, le gain est cependant moindre lors d'une fibroscopie qu'avec l'emploi d'un endoscope rigide. L'intérêt de son utilisation au cours de l'endoscopie diagnostique initiale n'est pas démontré dans la mesure où la résection endoscopique de tumeur de vessie (RTUV) sera elle-même faite en fluorescence.

 
Indication des examens d'imagerie

 
Échographie de l'appareil urinaire

L'efficacité de l'échographie pour le diagnostic de tumeur urothéliale vésicale dans les bilans d'hématurie est modérée avec une sensibilité d'environ 63 % [17

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] et dépend du morphotype du patient, de l'état de la réplétion vésicale et de l'expérience de l'opérateur.

Bien que l'uro-scanner (uro-tomodensitométrie [TDM]) doive être privilégié, une échographie de l'appareil urinaire est parfois réalisée dans le cadre d'une hématurie en raison de son innocuité en termes de rayonnements ionisants et d'injection de produit de contraste. Dans ce cas, si l'échographie ne retrouve pas d'explication à l'hématurie, un complément de bilan par uro-scanner +/− cystoscopie devra être réalisé.

 
Uro-TDM

L'uro-scanner (uro-TDM) est indiqué dans les bilans d'hématurie et ceux de tumeur urothéliale avérée présentant un risque d'atteinte des voies excrétrices supérieures : localisation trigonale [18

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], cytologie de haut grade, atteinte vésicale multifocale.

Il étudie l'ensemble de l'appareil urinaire par plusieurs acquisitions réalisées avant et après injection de produit de contraste et comporte obligatoirement une étude à la phase excrétoire de l'élimination du produit de contraste. L'utilisation d'un protocole avec injection de furosémide (Lasilix*) et double injection de produit de contraste (Split bolus) est recommandée pour améliorer les performances de l'examen et diminuer l'irradiation des patients [19

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Les performances de l'uro-TDM pour la détection des lésions urothéliales vésicales varient selon les études avec des sensibilités de l'ordre de 64-95 % et spécificités de l'ordre de 83-99 % [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Uro-IRM

L'imagerie par résonnance magnétique urinaire (Uro-IRM) permet également d'étudier l'ensemble de l'appareil excrétoire urinaire et constitue une alternative intéressante à l'uro-TDM notamment si celui-ci est contre-indiqué [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 21

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

L'intérêt particulier de l'uro-IRM réside dans la contribution des séquences d'imagerie fonctionnelle notamment de diffusion (Diffusion Weighted Images [DWI]) qui améliorent de façon significative les performances de l'examen. Les sensibilité et spécificité de la séquence de diffusion pour la détection des lésions vésicales sont respectivement de 95 et 85 % [22

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 23

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

À l'étage vésical, l'IRM semble permettre également d'évaluer le risque d'infiltration de la couche musculaire [24

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 25

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Des recommandations concernant la réalisation, l'interprétation et la standardisation des comptes-rendus d'IRM vésicale ont été publiées en 2018 sous la dénomination Vesical Imaging-Reporting and Data System (VI-RADS) [26

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Quand les délais d'obtention de l'examen ne retardent pas la prise en charge du patient, il est souhaitable de réaliser cette IRM vésicale multiparamétrique avant le geste de résection pour optimiser l'évaluation de la maladie (#ntabr4) [27

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 28

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 29

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 30

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 31

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

RTUV

 
Principes techniques et critères qualitatifs de la RTUV

Le diagnostic de la TV dépend principalement de l'examen histologique de la totalité de la lésion réséquée. Il est recommandé de réaliser auparavant un examen cytobactériologique des urines (ECBU) afin d'éliminer une infection urinaire [32

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Une cartographie des lésions doit préciser le nombre de tumeurs, leur topographie par rapport à l'urètre prostatique et aux orifices urétéraux, leur taille et leur aspect (pédiculé ou sessile). La résection doit être complète et profonde (présence de faisceaux du détrusor). L'absence de muscle sur les copeaux de résection est associée à un risque significativement plus élevé de maladie résiduelle et de récidive précoce en cas de tumeur pT1 et/ou de haut grade [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La RTUV doit être faite en monobloc, dans la mesure du possible, emportant du détrusor sous-jacent pour permettre une meilleure analyse tumorale et potentiellement améliorer la qualité de la résection avec la réduction du risque de récidive tumorale [33

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 34

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 35

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La technique de résection de référence est l'électrocoagulation monopolaire. La résection par électrocoagulation bipolaire et l'énucléation au laser sont des alternatives techniques proposables [36

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 37

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Les biopsies randomisées de la muqueuse optiquement saine n'ont pas d'intérêt démontré en routine, car la probabilité de détecter des lésions de CIS associé est très faible (< 2 %). Elles sont en revanche indiquées en cas de cytologie urinaire positive sans lésion visible, ou en cas de zones optiquement anormales évoquant un CIS [38

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Après résection, la méta-analyse de 4 études de phase III comparant une irrigation continue de sérum physiologique jusqu'à la 18e heure à une instillation postopératoire précoce (IPOP) de mitomycine C (MMC) n'a pas mis en évidence de différence de l'effet prophylactique vis-à-vis de la récidive des TVNIM [39

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Utilisation des techniques d'optimisation visuelle

 
Luminofluorescence vésicale

Lorsqu'elle est disponible, la luminofluorescence vésicale par hexaminolévulinate est recommandée lors de la première résection (outil diagnostique) de TVNIM et pour la recherche de CIS [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Elle a démontré une augmentation significative du taux de détection des tumeurs (au prix d'un certain taux de faux positifs) et un allongement de l'intervalle libre sans récidive. Une étude de coût-efficacité appliquée au système français a mis en évidence un gain Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) (indicateur économique visant à estimer la valeur de la vie) à l'utilisation de la luminofluorescence vésicale par hexaminolévulinate dès la première RTUV de toute TVNIM (#ntabr5) [41

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Narrow-Band Imaging (NBI)

Lorsqu'elle est disponible, l'imagerie en NBI est recommandée lors de la RTUV. La méta-analyse des résultats de 6 études sur l'utilisation de la magnification optique par NBI lors de la RTUV a montré un bénéfice pour réduire le risque de récidive tumorale à 3 mois, 1 et 2 ans [42

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La qualité des données issues de ces études ne permettait pas de définir quels patients bénéficient de la résection avec NBI et la méthodologie des 5 essais randomisés inclus dans la méta-analyse induit des biais en faveur d'une meilleure détection tumorale dans les bras traités avec NBI.

 
Indication de l'instillation postopératoire précoce de chimiothérapie (IPOP)

Après la RTUV, l'IPOP de MMC ou d'épirubicine est une option thérapeutique, en respectant systématiquement les contre-indications (hématurie et perforation vésicale) [43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Compte tenu de complications graves, mais rares (nécrose vésicale), il convient de toujours bien évaluer la balance bénéfice-risque pour le patient. L'IPOP doit être réalisée idéalement dans les 2 premières heures ou, au plus tard, dans les 24 heures qui suivent la RTUV. Une alcalinisation urinaire est nécessaire pour la MMC; Elle ne l'est pas avec l'épirubicine. L'IPOP diminuerait ainsi le risque de récidive tumorale à 1 et 5 ans de 35 et 14 % respectivement [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La méta-analyse des données individuelles de 2 278 patients inclus dans des études sur l'utilisation d'IPOP (de MMC, gemcitabine ou pirarubicine) a montré un bénéfice en réduction de 32 % du risque de récidive ultérieure après la résection de TVNIM dont le score EORTC est < 5, soit [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] :

 

au maximum 7 tumeurs, < 3 cm et supposément pTaG ≤ 2 ou T1G1BG;
une tumeur unique ≥ 3 cm et supposément pTaG ≤ 2 ou T1G1BG.

La cytologie urinaire permet d'exclure la présence d'une tumeur de haut grade. Ainsi, une IPOP de MMC est recommandée après la première résection de primodiagnostic de TVNIM.

 
Indication de la RtUV de réévaluation (dite « de second look »)

Une RTUV de réévaluation systématique dans un délai de 2 à 6 semaines après une RTUV estimée complète est recommandée seulement en cas de tumeur de stade pT1.

Une RTUV complémentaire doit être réalisée en cas :

 

d'absence de muscle identifié sur la pièce de résection initiale (sauf en cas de pTa de bas grade);
ou de tumeur volumineuse et/ou multifocale (résection incomplète).

L'objectif de cette réévaluation endoscopique et histologique est de permettre de réduire le risque de maladie résiduelle, une stadification plus précise de la tumeur, d'améliorer la sélection (et donc la réponse) des patients au traitement endovésical, de réduire la fréquence des récidives et de retarder la progression de la tumeur (#ntabr6) [45

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Des arguments complémentaires sont proposés dans l'annexe 1.

 

Classification pronostique

Le traitement des TVNIM dépend du risque de récidive, de progression et d'échec du traitement de la tumeur après résection complète initiale en un ou plusieurs temps (Figure 2). L'évaluation du risque peut être réalisée à l'aide des tables de l'EORTC [46

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] ou du CUETO [47

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] mais aucune n'est unanimement acceptée et utilisée par la communauté urologique en raison de la surestimation du risque de récidive et de progression et de leur utilisation peu adaptée à la pratique clinique. Une stratification actualisée a été établie dans le Tableau 3.

 
Figure 2
Figure 2. 

Algorithme de prise en charge des TVNIM.

 
Tumeurs de faible risque

Elles correspondent aux tumeurs urothéliales pTa de bas grade, unifocales et de moins de 3 cm sans antécédent de tumeur de vessie. Elles ont un risque de récidive et de progression qui est faible. Outre une IPOP, elle ne nécessite aucun traitement complémentaire [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Tumeurs de risque intermédiaire

Elles correspondent à toutes les autres tumeurs urothéliales pTa de bas grade qui ne présentent aucun des critères de risque élevé ou très élevé. Ces tumeurs ont un risque de progression faible mais un risque de récidive élevé. Leur traitement fait appel aux instillations endovésicales par chimiothérapie [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] ou à la BCG-thérapie avec un entretien de 1 an pour diminuer le risque de récidive [54

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Le BCG est plus efficace sur le risque de récidive, mais son profil de tolérance étant moins bon et le risque de progression étant faible, on propose habituellement la MMC en première intention et le BCG en cas d'échec [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Tumeurs de haut risque

Elles ont au moins un des facteurs de risque suivant : stade pT1, grade élevé, présence de CIS. Ces tumeurs ont un risque de récidive et de progression élevé. Leur traitement fait appel aux instillations endovésicales par BCG-thérapie avec un entretien de 3 ans [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références,48

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Tumeurs de très haut risque

Elles ont un risque de progression élevé (de l'ordre de 20 %) et précoce, soit parce que la probabilité d'éradication complète avant traitement est faible, soit parce qu'elles sont très agressives, qu'elles présentent un risque d'échec du traitement endovésical élevé ou qu'il existe un risque d'envahissement ganglionnaire dès le stade pT1 [49

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Il s'agit des tumeurs combinant l'ensemble des facteurs de risque (pT1 de haut grade avec CIS), des tumeurs avec envahissement lymphovasculaire et des tumeurs non urothéliales ou présentant des formes anatomopathologiques agressives. Sont également considérées à très haut risque les tumeurs de haut risque non reréséquées ou persistantes après le traitement de première ligne (induction par BCG). La BCG-thérapie et la cystectomie de première intention peuvent être proposées pour les traiter après avoir discuté de la morbidité de l'intervention avec le patient [50

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] (#ntabr7).

 

Traitements endovésicaux adjuvants

Le traitement adjuvant vise à réduire le risque de récidive pour les tumeurs intermédiaires, et de progression pour les tumeurs à haut risque. Le caractère incomplet de la résection est le facteur de risque d'échec le plus important. C'est plus souvent le cas lorsque le muscle n'a pas été vu, que la taille tumorale est > 3 cm ou que la tumeur est multifocale. A contrario, le taux de récidive ou de progression après traitement endovésical est minimal lorsque la RTUV de « second look » ne met pas en évidence de tumeur ou seulement des lésions pTa de bas grade [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Chimiothérapie endovésicale

 
Mitomycine C (MMC)

Le traitement classique est de 8 instillations hebdomadaires de 40 mg (instillation) dans 40 ml de solution saline (1 mg/ml), suivies ou non d'instillations mensuelles pendant 1 an maximum (traitement d'entretien). L'efficacité de la MMC est corrélée à la durée de contact entre le produit et l'urothélium. Une durée minimum d'instillation de 1 heure est requise [51

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La MMC avec entretien réduit le risque de récidive de 30 % par rapport aux instillations de BCG sans entretien.

 
Épirubicine

Dans le contexte de pénurie de MMC, le Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie (CCAFU) a proposé en novembre 2019 à l'Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament (ANSM) d'utiliser l'épirubicine comme agent de chimiothérapie alternatif. L'épirubicine a démontré son efficacité et est utilisée dans de nombreux pays dans les indications équivalentes à celles de la MMC [52

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Pour l'épirubicine, le traitement classique est de huit instillations hebdomadaires de 50 mg (instillation) dans 25 à 50 ml de solution saline (1 à 2 mg/ml). En cas de toxicité locale (cystite chimique), une réduction de dose allant jusqu'à 30 mg est recommandée. Pour les CIS, en fonction de la tolérance individuelle du patient, la dose peut être augmentée jusqu'à 80 mg.

 
Thermochimiothérapie

La thermochimiothérapie est un traitement en cours d'évaluation. Cette modalité de traitement fait appel à un dispositif maintenant la MMC à 40-44 °C pendant la toute la durée de l'instillation (1 heure). L'épirubicine n'a pas été évaluée avec ces techniques. Lorsqu'elle est disponible, cette modalité peut être proposée pour les TVNIM de risque intermédiaire après échec de la MMC et du BCG, ou pour les TVNIM de haut risque en l'absence de disponibilité du BCG ou d'intolérance possible en cas de refus ou d'inéligibilité à la chirurgie radicale mais avec des résultats oncologiques inférieurs [53

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 54

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 55

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Optimisation des instillations et prévention des effets secondaires

L'efficacité de la MMC et de l'épirubicine dépend de leur mode d'utilisation et de leur concentration. Les instillations de MMC à la dose de 2 mg/ml sont plus efficaces mais moins bien tolérées et ne seront pas proposées en première intention. Il en est de même avec les instillations d'épirubicine à 80 mg/50 ml. Il est recommandé de faire [43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] :

 

une réduction de la diurèse 8 heures avant l'instillation;
pour la MMC, une alcalinisation des urines (pH > 6).

Après l'instillation, pour chaque miction survenant dans les 6 heures, il est nécessaire de neutraliser les urines jetées par 200 ml d'eau de Javel prête à l'emploi. La première miction après l'instillation, dans les deux premières heures, se fera sur le lieu même de l'instillation. Les autres mictions peuvent raisonnablement avoir lieu au domicile du patient.

 
BCG-thérapie endovésicale

 
Modalité d'administration

Le BCG ne sera débuté qu'après cicatrisation vésicale, généralement 2 à 4 semaines après la résection et au plus tard au bout de 6 semaines et en l'absence de toute tumeur résiduelle. Le traitement d'induction comporte 6 instillations intravésicales hebdomadaires idéalement de 2 heures. Le traitement d'entretien est recommandé dans tous les cas et comporte 3 instillations hebdomadaires à 3, 6 et 12 mois de la résection pour les tumeurs de risque intermédiaire (entretien de 1 an) poursuivies tous les 6 mois jusqu'au 36e mois pour les tumeurs à risque élevé (entretien de 3 ans) [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Contre-indications

Le BCG ne doit pas être administré dans les cas suivants :

 
Formelles

 

Antécédent de réaction systémique au BCG (infection d'organe ou septicémie à BCG).
Déficit immunitaire sévère.
Cystite radique.
Tuberculose active.

 
Relatives

 

Persistance d'effets secondaires liés à la précédente instillation au moment de la nouvelle instillation (stade 3).
Infection des voies urinaires symptomatique.
Absence ou incertitude de l'intégrité de l'urothélium (hématurie macroscopique, sondage traumatique, ou les 2 à 4 semaines qui suivent un geste sur le bas appareil urinaire).

Des études avec de petits échantillons de patients ont rapporté l'absence d'augmentation des effets secondaires et une efficacité maintenue en cas d'antécédent de radiothérapie de l'aire vésicale sans cystite radique, ou en cas de déficit immunitaire modéré (traitement immunosuppresseur, virus de l'immunodéficience humaine [VIH] avec charge virale bien contrôlée). En l'absence d'alternative thérapeutique, il est recommandé d'y associer des mesures prophylactiques maximales qui pourront être ajustées à la tolérance observée (stade 2) [43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. L'hématurie microscopique, la leucocyturie et la bactériurie asymptomatique ne sont pas des contre-indications à la réalisation des instillations de BCG et ne nécessitent pas de traitement [56

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Prévention et prise en charge des effets secondaires

La prise en charge des effets secondaires est basée sur des avis de groupes experts (International Bladder Cancer Group [IBCG], CCAFU) et doit être adaptée à leur sévérité [57

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. On distingue (Tableau 4) les effets secondaires mineurs pour lesquels la poursuite du BCG est possible sous réserve de la mise en place de mesures symptomatiques, prophylactiques ou d'une interruption temporaire du BCG, des effets secondaires majeurs pour lesquels l'arrêt du BCG est le plus souvent définitif. Outre l'interrogatoire, il est recommandé d'utiliser une check-list ou un autoquestionnaire avant chaque instillation pour l'évaluation des effets secondaires.

Les effets secondaires mineurs (Tableau 5) peuvent être classés en trois stades de sévérité dont dépend leur prise en charge.

Les effets secondaires majeurs correspondent aux effets secondaires de stade 4 de sévérité. Ils sont généralement secondaires à un passage systémique du BCG. La présence de symptômes faisant évoquer ces affections doit faire interrompre les instillations et envisager une hospitalisation et une prise en charge spécialisée. Le traitement comprend généralement un traitement par corticoïdes à forte dose et une antibiothérapie antituberculeuse.

La persistance d'une hématurie ou de signes urinaires isolés résistants au traitement doit faire suspecter une récidive tumorale ou une complication et envisager la réalisation d'une cystoscopie. Les corticoïdes sont généralement administrés sur une période de moins de 15 jours, jusqu'à la disparition des symptômes. Les instillations de BCG sont inefficaces en cas de résection incomplète macroscopiquement. Les différentes souches de BCG ne sont pas similaires sur le plan génomique. Une seule étude randomisée était en faveur d'une légère supériorité de la souche Connaught sur la souche Tice. Toutefois les limites de l'étude ne permettent pas à ce jour de privilégier une souche par rapport à une autre (#ntabr8).

 

Surveillance des TVNIM

La surveillance des TVNIM est indispensable car le risque de récidive est élevé. Les modalités de surveillance sont basées sur des études rétrospectives et des avis d'experts (Tableau 6) [58

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

TVNIM de faible risque : les récidives dans ce groupe sont presque toujours des tumeurs de bas grade dont le risque de progression est quasiment nul.

TVNIM de risque intermédiaire : ce groupe est caractérisé par un fort risque de récidive mais un faible risque de progression. Les facteurs associés aux récidives sont par ordre décroissant d'importance : la multifocalité, un taux de récidive > 1 par an et la taille > 3 cm. Le risque peut être calculé à l'aide des tables de l'EORTC [46

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

TVNIM de risque élevé : le risque de progression est particulièrement important les deux premières années où la surveillance doit être trimestrielle. Le rythme diminue ensuite progressivement.

 
Cystoscopie et biopsies

La surveillance est principalement basée sur la cystoscopie qui ne peut être remplacée par aucune autre modalité de diagnostic. La cystoscopie à 3 mois est indispensable et a un rôle pronostique important afin de ne pas méconnaître une tumeur résistante au traitement. Des biopsies systématiques couplées à la cystoscopie sont recommandées à 3 mois lorsque du CIS était présent au diagnostic afin de vérifier l'efficacité du traitement par BCG. Elles seront également réalisées en cas de lésions suspectes en cystoscopie, sauf en cas de tumeur de faible risque où une électrofulguration est possible. Après 5 ans, les récidives des TVNIM de faible risque sont rares ou peu menaçantes et la surveillance par cystoscopie peut être interrompue. Les TVNIM de risque intermédiaire progressent rarement après 10 ans et leur surveillance peut être interrompue ou faire appel à des modalités moins invasives telles que l'échographie. La surveillance est poursuivie à vie pour les TVNIM de risque élevé, ou lorsque l'intoxication tabagique est maintenue. La Figure 3 résume le calendrier de suivi en fonction du risque. L'utilisation de la luminofluorescence (Hexvix ) en association à la fibroscopie vésicale de surveillance n'est pas recommandée [59].

 
Figure 3
Figure 3. 

Calendrier de traitement endovésical et de suivi des TVNIM en fonction de leur groupe de risque.

 
Cytologie urinaire et marqueurs

La cytologie urinaire est utile pour le diagnostic des tumeurs de haut grade. Les TVNIM de faible risque progressent rarement vers ces tumeurs. La surveillance par cytologie est donc inutile dans ce groupe. Pour les autres groupes en revanche, elle est systématiquement associée à la cystoscopie. Une cytologie urinaire positive isolée doit faire rechercher un CIS ou une tumeur du haut appareil urinaire. Aucun autre marqueur urinaire n'est aujourd'hui recommandé pour la surveillance [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Imagerie

Le risque d'atteinte de tumeur de la voie excrétrice supérieure (TVES) chez les patients pris en charge pour une tumeur de vessie est d'environ 5 % au cours de leur suivi. Les facteurs de risque principaux sont les tumeurs de haut grade, les atteintes touchant le trigone et les atteintes multifocales [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Pour ces patients à risque, l'uro-TDM dans le cadre de la surveillance doit être annuelle.

Quel que soit le groupe à risque, en cas d'apparition de symptômes cliniques ou de signes biologiques évoquant une atteinte de la voie excrétrice supérieure, la réalisation d'une uro-TDM est recommandée [60

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

L'uro-IRM permet également d'étudier l'ensemble de l'appareil excrétoire urinaire et constitue une alternative à l'uro-TDM notamment si celle-ci est contre-indiquée ou en cas d'examens répétés pour décroître l'irradiation du patient (#ntabr9) [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Traitement des récidives de TVNIM

 
Récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée à faible risque

 
Principes techniques

 
Place de la surveillance active

La surveillance active peut être proposée en option aux patients avec une récidive après plus de 1 an de suivi d'une TVNIM pTa de bas grade, d'au maximum 5 tumeurs, de taille ≤ 1 cm, ayant une cytologie urinaire négative et acceptant la surveillance plus rapprochée (observance) [61

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 62

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 63

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Place de la fulguration

Le traitement chirurgical de référence est la RTUV. Elle doit être associée à un second look en cas de résection incomplète, d'absence de muscle (sauf Ta bas grade ou G1), de pT1. En l'absence d'essai contrôlé randomisé, la fulguration peut être proposée comme une option chirurgicale pour le traitement des récidives papillaires des TVNIM de bas risque (moins de 5 tumeurs; taille < 0,5 cm) permettant de diminuer les risques périopératoires [64

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 65

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 66

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Place de l'optimisation visuelle

La luminofluorescence vésicale par hexaminolévulinate est recommandée lors de la RTUV des récidives de TVNIM initialement de bas risque. L'utilisation de la luminofluorescence associée à la lumière blanche améliore la détection des récidives des TVNIM. Cette technique permet une amélioration de la survie sans récidive [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Place de l'instillation postopératoire précoce de chimiothérapie

Elle peut être recommandée après la RTUV des récidives de TVNIM initialement de bas risque, sous certaines conditions. La méta-analyse des données individuelles de 2 278 patients inclus dans des études sur l'utilisation d'IPOP (de mitomycine, gemcitabine ou pirarubicine) a montré un bénéfice en réduction du risque de récidive ultérieure uniquement en cas de récidive [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] :

 

unique;
taille < 3 cm;
supposément Ta bas grade ou G1-2 (cytologie urinaire négative);
après 1 an de rémission (délai sans récidive supérieur à 1 an);
et l'absence de contre-indication (perforation vésicale, hématurie macroscopique, résection étendue).

 
Traitement adjuvant à la résection

Le traitement adjuvant dépendra du stade et du grade de la récidive.

 
Récidive sous la forme d'une TVNIM de risque intermédiaire

Les traitements adjuvants disponibles sont :

 

la chimiothérapie endovésicale (8 instillations hebdomadaires) avec traitement d'entretien. Les modalités idéales du traitement d'entretien ne sont pas clairement définies, il semble qu'une durée de traitement supérieure à 1 an ne soit pas justifiée [3];
les instillations de BCG avec un traitement d'entretien pendant 1 an (induction 6 hebdomadaires + entretien 3 hebdomadaires à 3, 6, 9 et 12 mois) [3].

 
Récidive sous la forme d'une TVNIM de haut risque

Dans cette forme de récidive, les instillations endovésicales de BCG sont recommandées (6 instillations hebdomadaires et 3 hebdomadaires à 3, 6, 12, puis tous les 6 mois pendant 3 ans) [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Récidive d'une tVNIM initialement classée à risque intermédiaire

 
Principes techniques

 
Place de la surveillance active

La surveillance active peut être proposée en option aux patients répondants présentant une récidive après plus de1 an de suivi d'une TVNIM pTa de bas grade, d'au maximum 5 tumeurs, de taille ≤ 1 cm, ayant une cytologie urinaire normale et acceptant la surveillance plus rapprochée [61

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 62

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 63

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Place de la fulguration

Lorsque la fragilité et les comorbidités du patient ne permettent pas d'envisager une RTUV, la fulguration peut être proposée comme une option chirurgicale pour le traitement des récidives papillaires des TVNIM de bas risque (moins de 5 tumeurs; taille < 0,5 cm) non symptomatiques [64

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 65

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 66

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Place de l'optimisation visuelle

Elle n'est pas recommandée de façon systématique lors de la RTUV des récidives de TVNIM initialement de risque intermédiaire.

La luminofluorescence a amélioré la détection des lésions Ta ainsi que la survie sans récidive dans le groupe des TVNIM de bas risque. Ainsi, son utilisation est recommandée uniquement pour les récidives de taille < 3 cm et présumées de stade Ta et de bas grade/G1 (cytologie urinaire négative) [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Place de l'instillation postopératoire précoce de chimiothérapie

Elle n'est pas recommandée de façon systématique après la RTUV des récidives de TVNIM initialement de risque intermédiaire.

D'après la dernière méta-analyse [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], l'IPOP a un bénéfice en termes de réduction du risque de récidive ultérieure uniquement en cas de récidive :

 

unique;
taille < 3 cm;
supposément Ta bas grade ou G1-2 (cytologie urinaire négative);
après 1 an de rémission (délai sans récidive supérieur à 1 an);
et l'absence de contre-indication (perforation vésicale, hématurie macroscopique, résection étendue).

 
Traitement adjuvant à la résection

Le traitement adjuvant dépendra du stade et du grade de la récidive.

 
Récidive sous la forme d'une TVNIM de risque intermédiaire

Les traitements adjuvants disponibles sont :

 

La chimiothérapie endovésicale avec traitement d'entretien en l'absence de prescription antérieure. Les modalités idéales du traitement d'entretien ne sont pas clairement définies, mais il semble que la durée ne doit pas dépasser 1 an [3].
Les instillations de BCG avec un traitement d'entretien pendant 1 an (induction 6 hebdomadaires + entretien 3 hebdomadaires à 3, 6, 9 et 12 mois) [3,48].

 
Récidive sous la forme d'une TVNIM de haut risque

En l'absence de critères d'agressivité (stade pT1 de haut grade/G3 + CIS, variant histologique de mauvais pronostic) pouvant indiquer une cystectomie précoce, le traitement par instillations endovésicales de BCG est recommandé (6 hebdomadaires et 3 hebdomadaires à 3, 6, 12 et puis tous les 6 mois pendant 3 ans) [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références,43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Récidive sous la forme d'une TVNIM de très haut risque

Le pronostic de ces tumeurs doit faire proposer la BCG-thérapie et la cystectomie pour les traiter après avoir discuté de la morbidité de l'intervention avec le patient. En effet, celle-ci doit être proposée idéalement avant la progression vers une TVIM [50

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée à haut risque

 
Principes techniques

 
Place de l'optimisation visuelle

La luminofluorescence est recommandée pour améliorer la détection des lésions planes de CIS lorsque la cystoscopie en lumière blanche ne révèle pas de lésion papillaire. Elle permet de détecter 26,7 % de lésions supplémentaires en comparaison avec la lumière blanche seule et d'améliorer la survie sans récidive. En revanche, la luminofluorescence n'a pas amélioré la détection des lésions papillaires de haut risque et n'a pas réduit leur risque de récidive [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Instillation postopératoire précoce de chimiothérapie

Elle n'est pas recommandée lors de la RTUV des récidives de TVNIM initialement de haut risque [44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Traitement adjuvant à la résection

Le traitement d'une récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée comme de haut risque et traitée par BCG-thérapie adjuvante doit être distingué en fonction de sa précocité et du grade histologique de la récidive.

 
Récidive précoce ≤ 12 mois sous la forme de TVNIM de bas grade

Une récidive de bas grade n'est pas considérée comme un échec du BCG. Une étude rétrospective a montré que les récidives de bas grade à 3 mois d'un traitement d'induction par BCG avaient un risque faible de progression. Ainsi, un traitement conservateur peut être envisagé par un nouveau cycle d'instillations endovésicales de BCG ou de chimiothérapie [67

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Récidive précoce ≤ 12 mois sous la forme de TVNIM de haut grade

Selon la même étude rétrospective, la récidive de lésions de haut grade (pTa, pT1) à 3 mois d'un traitement d'induction par BCG avait un risque de récidive et de progression à 1 an de 62 % et 17 %. Bien que ces données soient rapportées en l'absence de traitement d'entretien de BCG et/ou de 2e cycle d'induction, le traitement conservateur n'est pas recommandé dans les récidives précoces de haut grade [67

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Dans ces situations, la cystectomie totale permet une survie à 5 ans comprise entre 80 et 90 %. Lorsque le traitement radical est décidé, il doit être réalisé sans délai (avant 3 mois), car le risque de progression de la maladie vésicale est important. Les traitements conservateurs par instillations endovésicales ou thermochimiothérapie endovésicale sont considérés comme des alternatives possibles en cas de refus ou d'inéligibilité à la chirurgie radicale, mais avec des résultats oncologiques inférieurs [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références,68

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Récidive tardive > 12 mois sous la forme d'une TVNIM de bas grade

Une récidive de bas grade tardive n'est pas considérée comme un échec du BCG. Un nouveau cycle d'instillations endovésicales de BCG ou de chimiothérapie peut être envisagé.

 
Récidive tardive > 12 mois sous la forme d'une TVNIM de haut grade

Lors du premier épisode de récidive, une alternative conservatrice (instillations endovésicales de BCG) peut être proposée à condition que la RTUV de second look ne retrouve pas de tumeur ou uniquement des lésions de bas grade. La cystectomie totale peut être proposée aux patients lors d'une récidive de haut grade tardive (#ntabr10).

 
Cas particulier du CIS isolé

 
Place de la luminofluorescence

La luminofluorescence est recommandée pour améliorer la détection des lésions de CIS récidivant. Le taux de détection du CIS (91-97 % vs 23-68 %) et la survie sans récidive ont été améliorés par l'utilisation de la lumière bleue vs la lumière blanche seule [40

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Traitement du CIS isolé récidivant

Le traitement endoscopique du CIS doit être complété par des instillations endovésicales de BCG. Il est ensuite recommandé de faire une réévaluation endoscopique à 3 mois avec des biopsies sensibilisées par luminofluorescence.

Si des lésions de CIS persistent, il est recommandé de faire un 2e cycle d'induction de BCG puis une nouvelle réévaluation endoscopique à 3 mois avec des biopsies sensibilisées par luminofluorescence [69

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Il est recommandé d'éliminer une lésion de l'urètre et/ou du haut de l'appareil urinaire à l'origine de la récidive [70

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Lorsque du CIS est présent sur les biopises vésicales après 2 cycles d'induction, il s'agira d'un échec du BCG et une cystectomie totale sera indiquée [71

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Lorsque la cystectomie est décidée, elle doit être réalisée sans délai (3 mois). En cas de refus ou d'inéligibilité à la cystectomie, un nouveau cycle d'induction de BCG ou l'inclusion dans un essai clinique peut être proposé.

 

TVIM

La prise en charge des TVIM est résumée dans l'organigramme en Figure 4.

 
Figure 4
Figure 4. 

Arbre décisionnel de la gestion des TVIM.

Patient fit : clairance de la créatinine ≥ 60 mL/mn et PS < 2

Patient unfit : clairance de la créatinine < 60 mL/mn ou PS ≥ 2

NAC = chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante ; AC = chimiothérapie adjuvante

 

Bilan d'imagerie

 
TDM TAP avec temps excrétoire urinaire

 

L'uro-TDM avec injection de produit de contraste iodé et temps tardif excrétoire couplé au scanner thoracique est l'examen de référence du bilan d'extension des TVIM.
L'efficacité de l'uro-TDM pour la stadification locale (atteinte de la graisse périvésicale et/ou organes adjacents) varie selon les études entre 55 et 92 % [72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77].
La stadification ganglionnaire (N) par l'uro-TDM repose uniquement sur des critères morphologiques, notamment de petit axe ganglionnaire, et ne permet pas le diagnostic des micro-métastases. Ainsi, la sensibilité du scanner pour la détection des envahissements ganglionnaires est faible, variant selon les études entre 30 et 53 % avec une spécificité se situant entre 68 et 100 % [78, 79, 80, 81].

 
IRM de vessie multiparamétrique

 

Les performances de l'IRM pour la stadification locale T de la tumeur vésicale sont nettement supérieures à l'uro-TDM et permettent de faire la différence entre tumeurs superficielles et infiltrantes avec des sensibilités poolées de l'ordre de 84-92 % et des spécificités poolées de l'ordre de 79-91 % [82, 83, 84, 85]. Les données les plus récentes concernant les performances diagnostiques de l'IRM de vessie sont résumées dans l'Annexe 2.
La réalisation d'une IRM vésicale multiparamétrique avant résection est souhaitable pour le bilan de toute tumeur de vessie si les délais d'obtention de l'examen ne retardent pas la prise en charge du patient [86, 87, 88, 89, 90].

 
Scintigraphie osseuse

La recherche de localisations secondaires osseuses n'est pas systématique et doit être réalisée en présence de symptômes cliniques évocateurs [91

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 92

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Tomographie par émissions de positons (TEP)

 

À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a pas de place pour la TEP-TDM dans le bilan d'extension des tumeurs vésicales infiltrantes en dehors d'études cliniques [92, 93, 94, 95].
Les performances de la TEP pour la détection des ganglions chez les TVIM avant cystectomie sont équivalentes à l'imagerie conventionnelle avec une sensibilité de l'ordre de 56-57 % et une spécificité d'environ 92-95 % [96, 97].
Chez certains patients à risque métastatique significatif, la TEP-TDM au FDG peut être envisagée après validation en réunion de concertation pluridisciplinaire (RCP) avec, dans une méta-analyse récente, des sensibilité et spécificité de 82 et 89 % pour la détection des métastases à distance [98].

 
Scanner cérébral

 

La recherche de localisations secondaires cérébrales n'est pas systématique et doit être réalisée en présence de symptômes cliniques évocateurs [92].
L'IRM cérébrale et l'IRM du corps entier sont des alternatives possibles au scanner, notamment en cas de contre-indication (#ntabr11).

 

Prise en charge des TVIM localisées (T2-T3 N0 M0)

La prise en charge des TVIM localisées repose sur un traitement local, idéalement précédé d'une chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante.

Pour les histologies non urothéliales (carcinome épidermoïde, adénocarcinome, carcinome neuroendocrine), les recommandations sont différentes et sont résumées dans l'Annexe 3.

 
Traitement néo-adjuvant

 

La chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante a pour objectifs :
â—¦
d'éradiquer les micro-métastases et d'éviter l'implantation de cellules tumorales circulantes au moment de la chirurgie;
â—¦
de réduire la taille de la tumeur et de faciliter le geste chirurgical;
â—¦
de prolonger la survie du patient [99, 100].
Elle est recommandée pour des patients en capacité de recevoir une polychimiothérapie à base de cisplatine, c'est-à-dire :
â—¦
patients avec une clairance de la créatinine supérieure à 60 mL/min;
ET
â—¦
patients OMS 0 ou 1.
Pour des patients ayant une fonction rénale entre 50 et 60 mL/min, l'indication de la chimiothérapie néoadjuvante peut être discutée au cas par cas en RCP.
Dans le cas de patients dits « unfit » pour une chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante optimale, soit du fait d'une fonction rénale altérée, soit du fait d'un mauvais état général ou d'un âge ne permettant pas l'utilisation d'un protocole optimal, la cystectomie seule est indiquée.
Une réévaluation par TDM TAP est recommandée après la dernière cure de chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante afin de s'assurer de l'absence de progression et de valider l'indication de cystectomie. En cas de tumeur T3-T4, il est possible de proposer une évaluation tomodensitométrique après les deux premières cures de chimiothérapie.

Une dizaine d'essais thérapeutiques sont en cours afin d'évaluer la place de l'immunothérapie en situation néo-adjuvante seule ou en combinaison, chez ces patients, qu'ils soient fit ou unfit au cisplatine (clinicaltrials.gov) (Annexe 4).

 
Traitement chirurgical : cystectomie

 
Indications et délai

 

La cystectomie, précédée d'une chimiothérapie néoadjuvante à base de sels de platine est le traitement curatif de référence [99, 100].
La chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante (ou la cystectomie radicale en l'absence de chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante) doit être proposée dans un délai optimal inférieur à 8 semaines et maximal de 12 semaines après le diagnostic de TVIM [101, 102].
Lorsqu'une chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante a été effectuée, la prise en charge chirurgicale doit être réalisée dans les 10 à 12 semaines après la dernière cure de chimiothérapie [103, 104].

 
Aspects techniques

 
Voie d'abord

 

La cystectomie peut être réalisée par voie ouverte ou par voie cÅ“lioscopique simple ou robot-assistée.
Les voies d'abord ouvertes et mini-invasives par voie cÅ“lioscopique simple ou robot-assistée sont équivalentes sur le plan oncologique [105, 106, 107, 108, 109].
Pour les tumeurs très volumineuses ou localement avancées, la voie ouverte est à privilégier.
Il existe un avantage à la voie mini-invasive en termes de pertes sanguines avec un taux de complications comparable [110, 111].

 
Technique opératoire

 

Une évaluation de la fonction sexuelle des patients est recommandée afin d'adapter la technique opératoire (IIEF-5 chez l'homme, FSFI chez la femme).
En aucun cas, la préservation de la sexualité ne doit compromettre la qualité carcinologique de la chirurgie.
Chez l'homme : une cystoprostatectomie totale, incluant l'exérèse de la prostate et des vésicules séminales, est recommandée. Une préservation nerveuse et génitale peut être réalisée chez des patients bien sélectionnés (patients ayant une maladie localisée [cT2], à distance du col vésical, de la prostate ou de l'urètre prostatique) [112].
Chez la femme : une pelvectomie antérieure, emportant la vessie, l'utérus et la face antérieure du vagin, est recommandée. Une préservation nerveuse et génitale peut être réalisée chez des patientes bien sélectionnées (patientes ayant une tumeur localisée [cT2], à distance du col, du trigone ou de la face postérieure) [113].

 
Examens extemporanés

 

L'examen des recoupes urétérales n'est pas recommandé systématiquement. Il doit être réalisé en cas d'hydronéphrose, de tumeur multifocale ou de CIS associé [114, 115].
Un examen extemporané de la recoupe urétrale (orientée, pour faciliter l'analyse anatomopathologique) est recommandé lorsqu'une entérocystoplastie est envisagée ou en cas de doute sur l'indication d'urétrectomie.

 
Urètre

 

Une urétrectomie est recommandée en cas de marges urétrales positives, en cas d'envahissement massif de l'urètre prostatique chez l'homme, en cas d'envahissement du col vésical ou de l'urètre chez la femme.
L'urétrectomie peut être réalisée dans le même temps ou de manière différée [116].

 
Curage ganglionnaire

 

Un curage ganglionnaire pelvien étendu, incluant les régions obturatrices, iliaques externes, iliaques internes et iliaques primitives distales en remontant jusqu'au croisement des uretères, est recommandé au cours de la cystectomie [117, 118].
Il n'y a pas de bénéfice carcinologique à remonter le curage jusqu'à la bifurcation aortique [119].

 
Dérivation urinaire

 

Le choix du mode de dérivation urinaire doit être pris en accord avec le patient correctement informé. En l'absence de contre-indication, l'entérocystoplastie doit être systématiquement proposée chez l'homme et chez la femme.
L'urétérostomie cutanée trans-iléale de type Bricker et l'entérocystoplastie sont les dérivations urinaires à privilégier.
En cas d'entérocystoplastie, la préservation nerveuse et génitale est associée à une amélioration de la continence, chez l'homme [120] et chez la femme [121].
Les contre-indications formelles à la confection d'une entérocystoplastie sont :
â—¦
un envahissement de l'urètre (ou du col vésical chez la femme);
â—¦
une altération des fonctions cognitives et des troubles psychiatriques;
â—¦
une pathologie inflammatoire de l'intestin;
â—¦
des antécédents d'irradiation pelvienne à forte dose;
â—¦
la présence d'une insuffisance rénale avancée (< 50 mL/min);
â—¦
une espérance de vie limitée du patient.
À cela s'ajoutent des contre-indications relatives :
â—¦
âge > 75 ans (en raison des mauvais résultats en termes de continence);
â—¦
difficultés prévisibles de compliance ou de gestion de l'entérocystoplastie;
â—¦
difficultés d'ordre anatomique.
En cas de contre-indication à l'entérocystoplastie du fait d'un envahissement tumoral de l'urètre, une dérivation externe continente pourra être discutée, chez un(e) patient(e) capable de s'autosonder.
L'urétérostomie cutanée bilatérale doit être évitée et réservée aux cystectomies palliatives ou lorsque l'état du patient ne permet pas un autre mode de dérivation.

 
Compte-rendu anatomopathologique type

 

Le compte-rendu anatomopathologique type doit comporter une partie macroscopie et une partie histologie.
La présence de variants histologiques doit être précisée.
Les classifications moléculaires sont prometteuses, et un consensus semble avoir été trouvé, mais elles ne sont pas encore adaptées à la pratique clinique [122].

 
Optimisation préopératoire et postopératoire

 

L'inclusion de tous les patients dans un protocole de récupération améliorée après chirurgie (RAAC) est recommandée, suivant le protocole de l'Association Française d'Urologie [123].
La RAAC a pour objectif de réduire le taux de complications postopératoires et de réduire la durée de séjour des patients [124, 125].
L'ensemble des mesures techniques recommandées sont détaillées dans le Tableau 7.
Plus largement, l'optimisation périopératoire nécessite la mise en place d'un parcours patient bien défini.
L'évaluation oncogériatrique est recommandée pour les patients dont le score G8 est ≤ 14 [126].

 
Traitement trimodal (TTM)

 

Le TTM est un traitement curatif de préservation vésicale qui peut être proposé en cas de :
â—¦
tumeur unifocale;
â—¦
stade T2 maximum;
â—¦
absence de CIS;
â—¦
absence d'hydronéphrose;
â—¦
résection complète possible;
â—¦
en l'absence d'altération fonctionnelle majeure de la vessie;
â—¦
chez un patient bien informé et compliant (suivi rigoureux) [127, 128].
Les résultats carcinologiques sont identiques à ceux de la cystectomie chez les patients qui répondent à ces critères de sélection [129, 130, 131, 132].
En dehors de ces indications, le TTM peut être proposé en alternative thérapeutique à la cystectomie totale chez des patients inéligibles à la chirurgie en raison de leurs comorbidités. Les résultats carcinologiques sont, dans ce cas, inférieurs à ceux de la cystectomie [133, 134, 135].
Le TTM associe :
â—¦
un traitement local par résection transurétrale de vessie (au mieux complète, sinon maximaliste);
â—¦
suivi d'une radiothérapie externe (en privilégiant les techniques d' d'Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy [IMRT] et d'Image Guided Radiation Therapy [IGRT]) [136, 137];
â—¦
et une chimiothérapie radiosensibilisante concomitante (de potentialisation), à base de cisplatine, 5-fluorouracile + Mitomycine C, ou gemcitabine [138, 139, 140, 141].
Une chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante n'est pas recommandée de manière systématique chez des patients bien sélectionnés, mais peut être proposée au cas par cas et selon les mêmes modalités qu'avant traitement local par chirurgie [129, 130, 142].
Le suivi post-TTM repose sur la cytologie urinaire, la cystoscopie, le scanner TAP, tous les 3 mois pendant 2 ans, puis tous les 6 mois jusqu'à 5 ans, puis annuelle à vie.
En cas de récidive après TTM :
â—¦
sur un mode non infiltrant : un traitement conservateur peut être proposé selon les mêmes modalités qu'une TVNIM d'emblée (résection +/− instillations). Une cystectomie peut aussi être discutée [139].
â—¦
sur un mode infiltrant : une cystectomie de rattrapage doit être proposée (#ntabr12).

 
Traitements adjuvants

 
Chimiothérapie adjuvante

L'utilisation de la chimiothérapie postopératoire reste débattue, aucun essai n'ayant la puissance nécessaire pour confirmer l'intérêt d'une chimiothérapie postopératoire [143

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 144

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

La chimiothérapie adjuvante peut être indiquée, pour un patient n'ayant pas reçu de chimiothérapie néoadjuvante, en cas de tumeur à haut risque de récidive sur les données de l'analyse anatomopathologique et notamment : stade pT3 et pT4, statut ganglionnaire N+, marges chirurgicales positives, en évaluant la balance bénéfice/risque et seulement si la fonction rénale permet l'utilisation du cisplatine [145].
Pour des patients ayant une fonction rénale entre 50 et 60 mL/min, l'indication de la chimiothérapie adjuvante peut être discutée au cas par cas en RCP (#ntabr13).

 
Radiothérapie adjuvante

La radiothérapie adjuvante est actuellement en cours d'évaluation dans le cadre d'essais cliniques chez les patients pT3-T4 et/ou pN+ [146

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 147

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 
Alternatives thérapeutiques

 
Cystectomie partielle

 

Elle peut être proposée en cas de :
â—¦
lésion unifocale et primitive d'une portion mobile de la vessie à plus de 2 cm du col et du trigone, absence de CIS, taille ≤ 4 cm, stade T3a maximum;
â—¦
tumeur intradiverticulaire [148];
â—¦
adénocarcinome de l'ouraque [149].
Elle doit être associée à un curage ganglionnaire selon les mêmes modalités que lors d'une cystectomie totale [150].
La voie d'abord peut-être ouverte ou mini-invasive [151, 152].

 
Radiothérapie seule

 

Radiothérapie seule à visée curative :
â—¦
Efficacité limitée lorsqu'elle n'est pas associée à une chimiothérapie sensibilisante concomitante [138, 139].
â—¦
Discutée uniquement en cas de contre-indication à la chirurgie radicale et de contre-indication à la chimiothérapie.
Radiothérapie hémostatique à visée palliative :
â—¦
Bonne efficacité initiale, mais modeste dans le temps (médiane 3 à 6 mois) [153].
â—¦
Discutée en cas de contre-indication à l'anesthésie ou d'échec de l'hémostase endoscopique et en cas d'espérance de vie limitée.

 
Chirurgie palliative

 

Les RTUV itératives peuvent être proposées chez les patients non éligibles à la cystectomie ou à un traitement trimodal, avec une espérance de vie courte.
La cystectomie palliative n'est pas recommandée de première intention, sauf en cas de troubles mictionnels majeurs ou d'hématurie déglobulisante non contrôlée (c'est-à-dire après échec des stratégies hémostatiques : résection palliative, radiothérapie hémostatique, embolisation artérielle [154, 155, 156]).
La douleur n'est pas une indication de cystectomie palliative et doit être gérée par une analgésie multimodale adaptée.
L'obstruction du haut appareil urinaire n'est pas une indication de cystectomie palliative et doit faire privilégier une dérivation urinaire palliative sans geste vésical (néphrostomie, urétérostomie).

 

Prise en charge des TVIM avec envahissement ganglionnaire (T2-T4 N+ M0)

 
Chimiothérapie d'induction et réévaluation

 

Les patients avec atteinte ganglionnaire initiale sur le TDM ont un pronostic beaucoup plus réservé, ce d'autant qu'ils ont une atteinte rétropéritonéale (vs atteinte pelvienne seule) [157].
Une approche multimodale peut être proposée, avec une chimiothérapie première, avec une survie à 5 ans allant de 10 à 59 % [158].
La chimiothérapie d'induction n'est pas une chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante, la prise en charge postchimiothérapie doit être discutée au cas par cas, en fonction de l'extension tumorale et de la réponse thérapeutique.

 
Place de la chirurgie

 

Une cystectomie totale avec curage doit être proposée chez les patients en réponse complète sur les adénopathies pelviennes (cN0) sur la TDM TAP de réévaluation après chimiothérapie d'induction, et ce quelle que soit la masse résiduelle au niveau vésicale [159].
Chez les patients cN+ sur la TDM de réévaluation postchimiothérapie, la cystectomie n'est pas recommandée. Il s'agit de patients réfractaires aux sels de platine. La prise en charge sera celle d'une maladie métastatique.

 

Traitement et Suivi des TVIM métastatiques (T2-T4 M+)

 

Au stade métastatique, le traitement repose sur la chimiothérapie à base de cisplatine (CDDP) avec une médiane de survie de 14 à 15 mois, chez les patients éligibles pour cette chimiothérapie [160].
Le choix thérapeutique va tenir compte des facteurs pronostiques que sont l'état général altéré (PS > 1) et la présence de métastases viscérales [161, 162].

 
Chimiothérapie de première ligne

 

Le protocole standard initial de traitement de première ligne dans les tumeurs urothéliales métastatiques est le méthotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicine, cisplatine (MVAC), le MVAC HD (intensifié) ou le gemcitabine-CDDP (GC), avec une toxicité moindre pour une survie globale équivalente pour le GC [161,163].
Pour les patients considérés comme inéligibles (unfit ) au cisplatine, soit du fait d'une clairance de la créatinine < 60 mL/min, soit du fait d'une altération de l'état général (PS > 1), l'alternative est le carboplatine.
Pour les patients non éligibles à une polychimiothérapie, une monochimiothérapie par gemcitabine a une efficacité modérée (22 à 28 % de réponse objective, survie globale de 8 à 12 mois) avec une faible toxicité [164].
Les patients ayant un état général très dégradé (PS 3 ou 4) n'ont aucun bénéfice de la chimiothérapie.

De nombreux essais sont en cours, à base d'immunothérapie, en monothérapie ou en association, pour des patients fit ou unfit au cisplatine.

Dans l'essai JAVELIN Bladder 100, l'avélumab (anti-PD-L1), en traitement d'entretien pour des patients répondeurs à une première ligne de chimiothérapie, apporte un bénéfice en survie globale chez tous les patients, quel que soit le statut PD-L1 (21,4 mois vs 14,3 mois) [172

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Dès la mise à disposition de la molécule, il y aura une recommandation pour mettre en place un traitement d'entretien après une première ligne de chimiothérapie chez tous les patients étant soit stable, soit en réponse partielle ou complète (#ntabr14).

 
Stratégies de seconde ligne

 

Le pembrolizumab (anti-PD-L1) est recommandé en deuxième ligne de traitement des carcinomes urothéliaux avec un bénéfice en survie globale vs chimiothérapie (10,3 mois vs 7,4 mois) [165].
La vinflunine a été la première molécule qui a obtenu une autorisation de mise sur le marché (AMM) dans cette indication, avec un bénéfice en survie globale sur la population éligible (6,9 mois vs 4,3 mois). Elle n'est actuellement plus inscrite sur la liste en sus, ce qui ne permet pas son utilisation en pratique courante [166].
Pour les patients ayant eu une bonne réponse au cisplatine en première ligne, avec un intervalle libre de plus de 6 mois, une nouvelle série de MVAC HD est possible en deuxième ligne [167].

De nouvelles voies thérapeutiques prometteuses sont en cours d'exploration, avec les anti-FGFR chez des patients présélectionnés sur la présence d'altérations du gène (par screening moléculaire) et également le développement des immunoconjugués cytotoxiques. L'inclusion des patients dans un essai thérapeutique doit être favorisée.

 

Surveillance des TVIM

 

L'imagerie de référence dans la surveillance d'une TVIM est l'uro-TDM couplée au scanner thoracique [100,168,169].
En cas de contre-indication à la réalisation de l'uro-TDM, l'uro-IRM couplée à une TDM thoracique sans injection représente une excellente alternative pour la surveillance [168,170].
Compte tenu des faibles niveaux de preuve, la TEP-TDM au 18 FDG n'est pas recommandée pour la surveillance, ni en cas de récidive [100].
La surveillance de la fonction rénale est indispensable quel que soit le mode de dérivation urinaire [171].
En cas de préservation de l'urètre, il est recommandé de le surveiller par fibroscopie. La fréquence de la surveillance est à adapter à l'examen anatomopathologique de la pièce de cystectomie. La surveillance doit être plus fréquente en cas de facteur de risque de récidive : envahissement du stroma prostatique, multifocalité, localisation cervicale et présence de CIS [168,172].
En cas de traitement conservateur, un suivi cystoscopique régulier est recommandé [168]. La fréquence du suivi doit être adaptée au stade initial de la maladie (#ntabr15).

 

Déclaration de liens d'intérêts

Morgan Rouprêt : honoraires board Ambu, Bayer, Janssen, Roche, MSD, Fidia, Ipsen, Astellas, Arquer, Cepheid, Astra-Zeneca, Ferring, Oncodiag.

Géraldine Pignot : honoraires board Janssen, Bouchara-Recordati, BMS, Roche, Arquer, Astra-Zeneca, Astellas, Bayer.

Alexandra Masson-Lecomte : honoraires board Ipsen, Janssen, AstraZeneca, Ambu.

Eva Compérat : honoraires board Janssen, AstraZeneca, MSD.

François Audenet : honoraires board Nucleix; conferences Ferring, Ipsen, Janssen.

Mathieu Roumiguié : honoraires board Janssen, Roche, Ipsen, Astellas, Arquer, AstraZeneca, Ferring, Oncodiag, Pierre Fabre.

Nadine Houédé : honoraires board Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, BMS, Ferring, Ipsen, Janssen, MSD, Novartis, Pfizer, Chugai.

Stéphane Larré : honoraires board Nucleix, Sanofi.

Serge Brunelle : aucun.

Evanguelos Xylinas : honoraires board AstraZeneca, Ferring, Janssen.

Yann Neuzillet : honoraires board Astellas, AstraZeneca, BMS, Bouchara-Recordati, Ipsen, MSD et Sanofi Aventis.

Arnaud Méjean :honoraires Board : Pfizer, Ipsen, Astellas, Ferring, Janssen, Novartis, GSK, BMS, Roche, Pierre Fabre - Intérêt institutionnel : AFU, CCAFU, APHP, Université de Paris, ARTuR.

 

Annexe 1. TV Argumentaires complémentaires

 

Principes techniques et critères qualitatifs de la RTUV

Trois méta-analyses ont évalué l'intérêt de la résection monobloc ou en bloc. La première, portant sur 7 études dont 1 prospective et randomisée, a montré une réduction de la durée de sondage et d'hospitalisation ainsi qu'une réduction du risque de récidive à 2 ans associées à la résection monobloc [1

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La deuxième méta-analyse, incluant 22 études dont 2 prospectives et randomisées, a montré que pour des tumeurs ≤ 3 cm, la résection monobloc améliorait la qualité du prélèvement chirurgical (examen anatomopathologique) et pourrait améliorer l'exhaustivité de la résection, sans en modifier la morbidité [2

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. La troisième, plus récente, incluant 9 études dont 1 prospective et randomisée, aboutit aux mêmes conclusions [3

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Le bénéfice attendu sur la réduction du risque de récidive tumorale n'a pas pu être démontré au travers des résultats disponibles dans ces deux dernières méta-analyses.

 
Luminofluorescence vésicale

Deux méta-analyses des données globales de respectivement 14 essais de phase III et 4 essais de phase III et une étude rétrospective ont été rapportés par Chou, et al. [4

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] et Gakis, et al. [5

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Elles ont été poolées par Tran, et al. pour les autorités de santé canadiennes [6

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Elles montrent une réduction significative de 38, 24 et 25 % du risque de récidive à 3, 12 mois et au-delà de 12 mois respectivement avec l'hexaminolévulinate. Le niveau de preuve était faible en raison des biais inhérents aux études. Une réduction de 49 % du risque de progression vers une TVIM a été rapportée avec un niveau de preuve modéré (niveau de preuve 2). Ces méta-analyses ne permettaient pas de définir les caractéristiques des tumeurs des patients chez qui l'hexaminolévulinate a apporté une réduction de la survie sans récidive et/ou sans progression.

La méta-analyse des données brutes de 9 études sur l'utilisation de la fluorescence vésicale en lumière bleue après instillation préopératoire d'hexaminolévulinate a montré un bénéfice pour [7

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] :

 

la détection des lésions tumorales (pTa, pT1) lors des toutes premières RTUV (sauf en cas de tumeur unifocale < 3 cm avec cytologie urinaire normale) (niveau de preuve 2);
la détection des lésions de CIS (notamment lorsque la cytologie urinaire est suspecte de présence d'une tumeur de haut grade et la cystoscopie en lumière blanche ne révèle pas de lésion papillaire) (niveau de preuve 2).

 
Thermochimiothérapie

La pénétration et l'efficacité de la MMC en est améliorée avec une tolérance satisfaisante. Deux dispositifs sont commercialisés.

Le dispositif d'échauffement vésical par radiofréquence (type micro-ondes) délivré au moyen du cathéter vésical (Synergo®, Amstelveen, The Netherlands) a démontré une efficacité supérieure à la MMC seule avec une diminution de 59 % du risque de récidive et une efficacité équivalente au BCG associée à une morbidité supérieure au BCG dans une étude randomisée de phase III incluant des TVNIM de risques intermédiaire et élevé en analyse en intention de traiter. En per protocole (patients ayant reçu a minima un traitement d'incution de 6 instillations complet), la thermochimiothérapie par radiofréquence a démontré un bénéfice sur la survenue de récidives [8

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. En échec de BCG, malgré des données rétrospectives prometteuses, ce dispositif n'a pas démontré de supériorité en comparaison à la chimiothérapie ou à une nouvelle BCG-thérapie dans une étude prospective randomisée [9

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Le dispositif d'échauffement extra-vésical et de circulation en circuit fermé de la solution de MMC (HIVEC®, Wheathampstead, United Kingdom) a démontré une efficacité dans une étude prospective non randomisée de phase II incluant des TVNIM de risque intermédiaire. Ces données méritent d'être confirmées par une étude randomisée [10

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Cystoscopie et biopsies

Une étude de phase 3 portant sur 304 patients a évalué le gain diagnostic associé à l'utilisation de la fluorescence vésicale en lumière bleue après instillation d'hexaminolévulinate [11

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], montrant un gain de diagnostic chez 20,6 % des patients, dont une détection de CIS dans 61 % des cas. Le taux de faux positif rapporté à l'utilisation de la fluorescence vésicale en lumière bleue a été de 9,1 % et était comparable à celui rapporté à la lumière blanche. La morbidité associée à l'utilisation de la fluorescence vésicale en lumière bleue a été de 2 %, consistant en des dysuries et douleurs urétrales de grades 1-2. Cette étude isolée ne permet pas de recommander l'utilisation de la fluorescence vésicale en lumière bleue pour la fibroscopie de suivi des patients atteints de TVNIM (niveau de preuve 3).

 
Place de la surveillance active

La surveillance active d'une récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée comme de faible risque ou intermédiaire a été évaluée dans le cadre de deux études prospectives. Les critères d'inclusions et de maintien dans le protocole de surveillance étaient un nombre maximal de 5 tumeurs et une taille tumorale maximum de 1 cm, associé à une cytologie urinaire négative pour un carcinome urothélial de haut grade. La surveillance consistait en une cytologie urinaire et une cystoscopie trimestrielle la première année puis semestrielle ensuite. La RTUV a été évitée dans l'année suivant l'inclusion chez 55 et 60 % des patients respectivement dans l'étude espagnole [12

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] et italienne [13

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] sans compromettre le pronostic carcinologique des patients surveillés [14

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Eu égard à ces données, la surveillance active peut être proposée en option aux patients répondant présentant une récidive après plus d'un an de suivi d'une TVNIM pTa de bas grade, d'au maximum 5 tumeurs, de taille ≤ 1 cm, ayant une cytologie urinaire normale et acceptant la surveillance plus rapprochée (niveau de preuve 3).

 
Place de la fulguration

Le traitement chirurgical de référence est la RTUV. Elle doit être associée à un second look en cas de résection incomplète, d'absence de muscle (sauf Ta bas grade ou G1), de pT1. En l'absence d'essai contrôlé randomisé, la fulguration peut être proposée comme une option chirurgicale pour le traitement des récidives papillaires des TVNIM de bas risque (moins de 5 tumeurs ; taille < 0,5 cm) permettant de diminuer les risques péri-opératoires (niveau de preuve 3) [15

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

Dans l'étude prospective de Planelles Gomes J, et al., 130 patients ont été traités entre février 2013 et février 2016 par la vaporisation au laser Holmium-YAG de récidives TVNIM de risque faible (n = 49) ou intermédiaire (n = 64), ou de TVNIM de haut risque chez des patients ASA4 (n = 17) [16

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Le taux de récidive constaté à la 1re fibroscopie (3 mois) a été de 17 %. À 6 mois, 20 % des patients (6/49 - 12 % des faibles risques, 18/64 - 28 % des risques intermédiaires et 2/17 - 12 % des hauts risques).

Dans l'étude prospective de Rivero Guerra A, et al., 59 patients ont été traités entre janvier 2009 et décembre 2016 par la vaporisation au laser Holmium-YAG de récidives papillaires (max. 6 lésions, < 10 mm, cytologie urinaire négative) de TVNIM de risque faible [17

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Le taux de récidive a été de 50 % à 27 mois. La survie sans récidives après traitements des 1res récidives de TVNIM a été supérieure à celle après traitements de récidives itératives de TVNIM.

Dans l'étude prospective de Wong KA, et al., 54 patients âgés ou fragiles ont été traités entre mars 2008 et juillet 2011 par la vaporisation au laser Holmium-YAG de récidives de TVNIM de tous groupes de risque et TVIM, de faible volume (< 3 cm) [18

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Soixante-quatorze procédures ont été faites dont 30 avec luminofluorescence. Le taux de récidive à 1 an a été de 65,1 et 46,9 % pour les patients traités sans et avec luminoflurorescence respectivement. Incluant une population atteinte de tumeurs plus hétérogènes et traitée avec une méthode non recommandée (fibroscopie avec luminofluorescence), les résultats de cette étude font l'objet de réserves dans l'élaboration de recommandations.

 
Traitement du CIS isolé récidivant

L'étude du SWOG 8507 a montré que le taux de réponse complète à 6 mois était meilleur qu'à 3 mois (BCG traitement d'induction 68 vs 55 % ; BCG traitement Induction + entretien 84 vs 57 %) [19

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

La réponse aux instillations endovésicales de BCG est un facteur pronostic important, 10-20 % des patients répondeurs au BCG auront une progression vers la TVIM contre environ 66 % des patients non répondeurs (niveau de preuve 2) [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Une récidive après un an de rémission est un facteur prédictif indépendant de meilleure réponse au traitement.

Une étude rétrospective rapportait plus de 50 % de lésions urétérales ou urétrales associées aux récidives de TVNIM après BCG (niveau de preuve 4) [21

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

La cystectomie pour CIS résistant aux traitements conservateurs permet une survie globale à 5 ans comprise entre 75 et 89 % [22

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Annexe 2. Place de l'IRM de vessie dans la prise en charge des TVIM

Les performances de l'IRM pour la stadification locale T de la tumeur vésicale sont nettement supérieures à l'uro-scanner et permettent de faire la différence entre tumeurs superficielles et infiltrantes avec des sensibilités poolées de l'ordre de 84-92 % et spécificités poolées de l'ordre de 79-91 % [1

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-4

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Des recommandations concernant la réalisation, l'interprétation et la standardisation des comptes-rendus d'IRM vésicale ont été publiées en 2018 sous la dénomination Vesical Imaging-Reporting and Data System (VI-RADS) [5

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Les études de validation du VI-RADS sont encourageantes à la fois en termes de reproductibilité interlecteurs et de performances diagnostiques [6

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-13

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

En attendant les résultats des études en cours, la réalisation d'une IRM vésicale multiparamétrique avant résection est souhaitable pour le bilan de toute tumeur de vessie si les délais d'obtention de l'examen ne retardent pas la prise en charge du patient [14

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-19

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] (niveau de preuve faible).

L'IRM améliore la stadification ganglionnaire de la maladie par rapport au scanner [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Deux méta-analyses récentes retrouvent une Sensibilité entre 56 et 60 % et une Spécificité entre 91 et 94 % traduisant les difficultés persistantes de l'imagerie à diagnostiquer les métastases dans des ganglions de petite taille [20

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 21

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Plusieurs études évoquent une amélioration de la stadification ganglionnaire et notamment de la sensibilité de l'examen par l'utilisation des séquences de diffusion (DWI) [22

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-26

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

L'IRM vésicale initiale pourrait également permettre d'estimer le pronostic de la tumeur [27

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 28

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-29

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], le grade cellulaire de la lésion [24

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références29

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-37

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références], ou la sensibilité à la radiochimiothérapie [38

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-42

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] mais ces données sont encore préliminaires.

Après chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante, l'IRM peut également servir à la réévaluation de la tumeur vésicale [42

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 43

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-44

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] et dans le bilan préchirurgical pour évaluer notamment les possibilités de préservation génitale (niveau de preuve faible). À l'heure actuelle, l'IRM vésicale pendant ou après chimiothérapie néoadjuvante peut être proposée dans le cadre d'études scientifiques [45

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-50

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Annexe 3. Prise en charge des carcinomes non urothéliaux

 

Faible niveau de preuve (études rétrospectives avec de petits effectifs) - Avis d'experts.
Ce paragraphe ne concerne pas les histologies mixtes (carcinomes urothéliaux avec différentiation ou contingent non urothélial minoritaire associé) de pronostic assimilable aux formes urothéliales pures, et qui doivent être traités de la même façon [1].
Les tumeurs de vessie non urothéliales de stade T1 doivent être prises en charge comme des tumeurs infiltrantes.

 

Carcinome épidermoïde

 

En raison de son efficacité moindre par rapport aux tumeurs urothéliales [2, 3-4], la chimiothérapie néoadjuvante n'est pas recommandée et une cystectomie avec curage doit être réalisée en première intention si tumeur extirpable.
En cas de tumeur cT2-cT3, privilégier une cystectomie sans chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante.
En cas de tumeur cT4 et/ou non extirpable en marges saines, privilégier une chimiothérapie première (à base de cisplatine), suivie si possible d'un traitement locorégional adapté à la réponse thérapeutique.
La chimio adjuvante n'est pas recommandée car son efficacité n'a pas été démontrée [5].

 

Adénocarcinome

 

Une tumeur du dôme, avec une histologie d'adénocarcinome, doit être considérée comme un cancer de l'ouraque.
Une exploration digestive (coloscopie et gastroscopie) est recommandée pour éliminer une origine digestive.
La chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante n'a pas fait la preuve de son efficacité [4].
En cas de cancer de l'ouraque, une cystectomie partielle avec résection monobloc de l'ouraque emportant l'ombilic et curage ganglionnaire associé peut être proposée, si le bilan d'extension est négatif et si la tumeur est bien limitée au dôme (< 3 cm) [6].
Pour les adénocarcinomes non ouraquiens, de stade localisé, une cystectomie totale est recommandée.
Une chimiothérapie adjuvante adaptée à la composante adénocarcinomateuse (de type tumeurs colo-rectales) peut être proposée si N+ ou R+.
Pour les formes métastatiques, une chimiothérapie est recommandée, à base de cisplatine ou de 5-fluorouracile [7, 8].

 

Carcinome neuro-endocrine

 

Un PET-scanner au FDG à la recherche de localisations à distance est recommandé.
Une exploration cérébrale (TDM ou IRM) est également recommandée en raison de la fréquence des métastases à ce niveau.
Un dosage des marqueurs neuro-endocrines, Chromogranine A et NSE est recommandé au diagnostic et au cours du suivi postthérapeutique.
Pour les formes localisées, une chimiothérapie par cisplatine-étoposide (VP16) est recommandée en première intention, suivie d'un traitement local de consolidation par cystectomie totale ou radiothérapie externe [4,9-12].
Pour les formes métastatiques, une chimiothérapie par cisplatine-étoposide (VP16) est recommandée [13, 14].

 

Annexe 4. Chimiothérapie néoadjuvante

La dernière méta-analyse publiée portant sur 3 285 patients dans 15 études randomisées confirme l'intérêt d'une chimiothérapie néoadjuvante à base de cisplatine, avec une amélioration de la survie globale de l'ordre de 8 % à 5 ans, quel que soit le stade initial de la TVIM [1

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-4

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] (niveau de preuve 1). Le méthotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicine, cisplatine (MVAC) ou le MVAC haute dose (HD) (intensifié) sont les deux protocoles référencés dans cette indication. Le nombre optimal de cycles de chimiothérapie n'a jamais été déterminé précisément, et varie de 4 à 6 cycles pour le protocole MVAC HD et de 3 à 4 cycles pour le MVAC. Le protocole gemcitabine-cisplatine n'a jamais été validé dans le cadre d'un essai prospectif. Il est actuellement à l'étude dans le protocole national VESPER (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01812369), qui compare 4 cycles de cisplatine gemcitabine à 6 cycles de MVAC HD. Les premiers résultats communiqués à l'American Society of Clinical Oncology-Genitourinary (ASCO-GU) 2019 retrouvent une réponse histologique significativement plus importante dans le bras MVAC HD, la survie sans progression et la survie globale ne sont pas attendues avant 2021 [5

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Le carboplatine n'a jamais fait la preuve de son intérêt ou de son équivalence au cisplatine dans cette indication.

Après chimiothérapie néoadjuvante, 20-40 % des patients ont une réponse complète (pT0), ce qui est associé à une amélioration de la survie globale [6

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références, 7

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références]. Plusieurs biomarqueurs de réponse à la chimiothérapie sont actuellement en cours d'évaluation, incluant certaines mutations [8

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références-11

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références] ou les sous-types moléculaires [12

Cliquez ici pour aller à la section Références].

 

Annexe 5. Compte-rendu anatomopathologique type pour la cystectomie

 

Renseignements

(notamment traitements antérieurs)

 

Macroscopie

Taille de la pièce et longueur des uretères

Localisation(s) tumorale(s) (uni/multifocale)

Taille de la tumeur (voir la plus grande par ex.)

Aspect de la tumeur

Urètre : longueur

Si prostate : taille, avec encrage

Vésicules séminales

Utérus, annexes, ovaires, lambeau vagin

 

Histologie

Type de tumeur

Grade

Infiltration (lamina propria/ musculaire muqueuse/musculeuse interne externe/graisse périvésicale/prostate/utérus/autre)

Type de tumeur/variant

Emboles lymphovasculaires

Autres lésions/lésion planes (CIS)

Granulomes

Recoupes/limites

Ganglions dans la graisse périvésicale

Immunohistochimie

Si autre tumeur associée, faire CR complémentaire (prostate/ utérus/…)

 

Curages

Nombre de ganglions

Taille des ganglions

Si N+, taille de la plus grosse métastase ganglionnaire, et préciser si rupture capsulaire

 

Diagnostic/conclusion

Selon la classification pTNM 2017 (ou ypTNM si le patient a reçu de la chimiothérapie néoadjuvante)

   

 



Recommendations - risk factors  Level 
Smoking cessation is essential to reduce the risk of NMIBC progression  Strong 
Monitor workers exposed to bladder carcinogens by regular urine cytology tests.  Strong 

 

Table 1 - TNM 2017 classification of bladder cancer
Stage T  Description  Name 
pTa  Variable grade papillary carcinoma without lamina propria invasion  NMIBC 
pTis  High-grade non-invasive flat tumour - carcinoma in situ 
pT1  Variable grade papillary carcinoma with lamina propria invasion but no muscle invasion 
pT2  Tumour invades muscularis propria
pT2a Tumour invades superficial muscularis propria (inner half)
pT2b Tumour invades deep muscularis propria (outer half) 
MIBC 
pT3  Tumour invades perivesical tissue
pT3a Microscopically
pT3b Macroscopically (extravesical mass) 
pT4  Tumour invades any of the following: prostate stroma, seminal vesicles, uterus, vagina, pelvic wall or abdominal wall
T4a Prostate stroma, seminal vesicles, vagina or uterus
T4b Pelvic wall or abdominal wall 

 

Légende :
N Regional lymph nodes
Nx Regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed
N0 No regional lymph node metastasis
N1 Metastasis in a single lymph node in the true pelvis (hypogastric, obturator, external iliac, or presacral)
N2 Metastasis in multiple lymph nodes in the true pelvis (hypogastric, obturator, external iliac, or presacral)
N3 Metastasis in one (or more) common iliac lymph node(s)
Distant metastasis
M0 No distant metastasis
M1 Distant metastasis
*yp: y: stage reassessed after neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy or radiotherapy)
 

Recommendations: pathology  Level 
Use the TNM 2017 classification to define the tumour stage  Strong 
Use WHO 1973 and 2004 classifications to define tumour grade  Strong 
The term “superficial bladder tumour” should no longer be used  Strong 

 

Recommendations: action based on urine cytology  Level 
Cytology results  Action   
Material unsatisfactory for assessment (specify the cause)  Repeat urine cytology under better conditions  Weak 
Negative cytology (negative for high-grade urothelial carcinoma)  No change in management  Weak 
Presence of atypical urothelial cells  Eliminate one cause (e.g. polyomavirus infection, inflammation) and repeat urine cytology in 6 months.  Weak 
Presence of urothelial cells suggestive of high-grade urothelial carcinoma  Continue the usual examinations to detect BC  Weak 
High-grade urothelial carcinoma 
Low-grade urothelial neoplasia 

 

Table 2 - Items to be mentioned in the report of a TURBT analysis
Material analysed  Number of chips, weight, size % of tumour chips 
Cytology  WHO 1973 and 2004 grade 
Histology  Lamina propria: seen/invaded/ other (e.g. epithelioid and giant cell granulomas) Muscularis mucosae: seen/invaded/other Muscularis propria: seen/invaded/other Tumour type/histological variant
Lymphovascular emboli Other lesions/flat lesions 
Immunohistochemistry  Adapted 
Diagnosis / Conclusion  pTNM 2017 (pTa, pT1 or pT ≥ 2; it is not possible to specify
pT2a, pT2b or pT3 from TURBT chips) 

 

Recommendations: Initial diagnostic assessment  Level 
Perform a flexible cystoscopy if there is a suspicion of bladder cancer that has not been confirmed by an imaging examination.  Strong 
The flexible cystoscopy should specify the number, size, topography, and appearance of the tumour and bladder mucosa.  Strong 
Perform CTU or MRI when the cystoscopy reveals multiple and/or trigonal tumours or when there is a suspicion of NMIBC on clinical examination.  Weak 
Perform routine urine cytology to detect high-grade lesions.  Weak 
Propose CTU or MRI as 1st line treatment in the assessment of macroscopic haematuria.  Weak 

 

Recommendations: use of blue light fluorescence cystoscopy  Level 
First resection for the initial diagnosis  All tumours, except for unifocal tumours, < 3 cm with normal urine cytology.  Strong 
Second look resection  Only when urine cytology is suggestive of the presence of a high-grade tumour and white light cystoscopy does not reveal papillary lesions. (Identification of CIS)  Strong 
Recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as low risk  All situations  Strong 
Recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as intermediate risk  Only for recurrences of sizes < 3 cm and presumed to be Ta and Low Grade /G1 (negative urine cytology).  Strong 
Recurrence of NMIBC initially classified as high risk  Only when urine cytology is suggestive of the presence of a high-grade tumour and white light cystoscopy does not reveal papillary lesions. (Identification of CIS)  Strong 

 

Recommendations: Initial TURBT diagnosis  Level 
The resection should be complete and deep (presence of bundles of the detrusor muscle).  Strong 
TURBT should be performed en bloc, if possible.  Weak 
Perform randomised biopsies of optically healthy mucosa in case of positive urine cytology without visible lesions, or in case of optically abnormal areas suggestive of carcinoma in situ.  Strong 
When available, hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy is recommended for the first resection (diagnostic tool) of NMIBC and to identify CIS.  Strong 
When available, NBI is recommended during TURBT.  Strong 
Administer early postoperative IVCT, ideally within 2 hours and no more than 24 hours after the first TURBT and in the absence of haematuria and/or bladder perforation, for:
- a maximum of 7 tumours, < 3 cm and presumed to be pTa G ≤ 2 or T1 G1 (negative cytology)
- a single tumour ≥ 3 cm and presumed to be pTa G ≤ 2 or T1 G1 (negative cytology) 
Strong 
When early postoperative IVCT is not recommended, initiate continuous saline irrigation after TURBT.  Weak 
Analyse all TURBT specimens for the diagnosis of BC: stage, grade and histology.  Strong 
A second-look TURBT should be performed after TURBT that is considered to be complete only in case of stage pT1 tumour.  Strong 

 

Table 3 - Stratification and treatment of NMIBC
Risk  Criteria  Treatment 
Low  Low-grade pTa urothelial carcinoma, less than 3 cm, unifocal, with no history of bladder tumour, including low malignancy potential tumours  Early postoperative IVCT 
Intermediate  Low-grade pTa urothelial carcinoma that meets none of the criteria for high or very high risk  Intravesical instillations
- Mitomycin C or epirubicin or
- BCG treatment with maintenance for one year 
High risk  Urothelial carcinoma with at least one of the following criteria:
- pT1
- High grade (G3)
- Presence of CIS 
Intravesical instillations
- BCG treatment with maintenance for 3 years
The tumour must have been resected at least once with the presence of the detrusor muscle. 
Very high risk   - pT1G3 + CIS *
- pT1G3 multifocal *
- pT1G3 > 3 cm *
- pT1G3 + lymphovascular invasion *
- pT1 G3 of the prostatic urethra
- pT1 of aggressive pathological forms  
• Propose cystectomy with lynphadenectomy
• Intravesical instillations of BCG treatment with maintenance for 3 years
The tumour must have been resected at least once with the presence of the detrusor muscle.  

 

[*]  These tumours may be reclassified as high risk if the last re-resection is < pT1 and the muscle is seen. Cystectomy is then optional.

Recommendations: prognostic classification  Level 
NMIBC should be classified according to the risk of recurrence and progression.  Strong 
Low-risk NMIBC justifies early postoperative IVCT without additional adjuvant therapy.  Strong 
Intermediate-risk NMIBC justifies adjuvant therapy with intravesical instillations of chemotherapy or BCG treatment.  Strong 
High-risk NMIBC justifies adjuvant therapy by intravesical instillations of BCG treatment.  Strong 
Very high-risk NMIBC justifies adjuvant therapy with intravesical instillations of BCG treatment or radical cystectomy with lymphadenectomy.  Strong 

 

Table 4 - classification and management proposals for minor side effects
Duration of side effects  Severity  Treatment  Symptomatic/prophylactic measures 
> 2 hours and < 48 hours  Stage I  Continuation of BCG Symptomatic measures  - NSAIDs
- Paracetamol 
>48 hours and < 7 days  Stage II  Continuation of BCG Prophylactic measures  - ofloxacin 200 mg at 6 hours and 18 hours
- dose reduction to 1/3
- contact time reduced to 1 hour 
≥ 7 days or suspected infection  Stage III  BCG interruption ≥ 1w Therapeutic measures  - ofloxacin 400mg/d
- corticosteroids 0.5-1mg/kg/day
- isoniazid and rifampicin 

 

Table 5 - side effects related to BCG instillations
Minor  Local (cystitis)
- overactive bladder,
- haematuria,
- urinary incontinence,
- suprapubic pain,
- burning on urination
General (flu syndrome)
- asthenia
- myalgia,
- fever < 38.5° < 48 hours 
Major  - Respiratory or circulatory distress
- Sepsis or organ infection (prostate, lung, epididymis, testis, kidney, liver, joint)
- Liver failure
- Allergic reaction (skin rash, arthralgia) 

 

Recommendations: adjuvant intravesical therapies  Level 
Reduce diuresis to optimise the tolerability and efficacy of intravesical instillations.  Strong 
Alkalinise urine to optimise the effectiveness of mitomycin C.  Strong 
Do not alkalinise urine for epirubicin instillations.  Strong 
The maintenance schedule for BCG instillations should be 1 year for intermediate-risk BC and 3 years for high-risk BC.  Strong 
Intravesical instillations of mitomycin C maintained for one year are more effective than BCG instillations without maintenance in reducing the risk of recurrence for intermediate-risk BC.  Weak 
BCG instillations are ineffective in cases of residual BC.  Strong 
Propose cystectomy as first-line treatment for very high-risk BC  Strong 
Use a checklist or self-questionnaire before each BCG instillation to assess side effects.  Weak 
Postpone BCG instillation if symptoms persist after one week  Strong 
In case of intolerance to BCG instillations, propose one or more of these options: paracetamol, NSAIDs, ofloxacin 6 hours and 18 hours after instillation, postponement of instillation, dose reduction up to 1/3, reduction of contact time. Anticholinergics are ineffective.  Strong 
Microscopic haematuria, leukocyturia, and asymptomatic bacteriuria are not contraindications to BCG instillations and do not require treatment. Urine culture before each instillation is optional.  Strong 
Immediately start treatment with ofloxacin and a corticosteroid, then anti-tuberculosis drugs after specialist advice in the event of a major side effect to BCG,  Strong 
Consider tumour recurrence or complication in case of persistent haematuria or isolated urinary signs that are resistant to treatment, and perform a cystoscopy  Weak 

 

Table 6 - NMIBC surveillance modalities
  Cystoscopy  Cytology  CTU 
Low risk  - 3rd and 12th month, then
- annually for 5 years 
No   
Intermediate risk  - 3rd and 6th month, then
- every 6 months for 2 years, then
- annually for at least 10 years 
Yes  Not systematic* 
High risk  - 3rd and 6th month, then
- every 3 months for 2 years, then
- every 6 months up to 5 years
- then every year for life 
Yes  Annually 

 

[*]  An annual CT scan is recommended for high-risk tumours

Recommendations: NMIBC surveillance  Level 
Routinely perform cystoscopy at 3 months, and perform bladder biopsies when CIS is present prior to instillations.  Strong 
The frequency of control cystoscopies depends on the risk of recurrence and progression. It must be combined with cytology for high-grade tumours. No other urine test can replace these tests.  Strong 
No systematic surveillance by imaging of the upper urinary tract in NMIBC  Weak 
Perform a CTU to identify upper urinary tract tumours in the following situations:
- If symptoms suggestive of UTUC are present. Inform patients of the nature of these symptoms and the need to see a doctor.
- In the event of a single or multifocal recurrence of a high-grade tumour
- In the event of a multifocal recurrence of a low-grade tumour that affects the ureteral perimeatic areas or the trigone
- In the presence of positive urine cytology without visible bladder lesion 
Strong 

 

Recommendations: treatment of recurrences after BCG treatment  Level 
Time to recurrence  Grade of the recurring NMIBC  Treatments   
Early < 12 months  Low Grade  Intravesical BCG or chemotherapy instillations  Weak 
High Grade  Cystectomy  Strong 
Late > 12 months  Low Grade  Intravesical BCG or chemotherapy instillations  Weak 
High Grade  Second look TURBT and, in the absence of residual high-grade lesions, intravesical BCG instillations  Weak 

 

Recommendations: staging MIBC  Level 
Perform CTU with iodinated contrast medium injection and late excretory phase along with a chest CT.  Strong 
Perform a multiparametric bladder MRI before resection if this does not delay patient management.  Weak 

 

Table 7 - Perioperative rehabilitation protocol for enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS)
ERAS criteria  Specificities for cystectomy 
PREOPERATOIRE 
Patient information  Smoking cessation aid
Urinary diversion and care pathway information 
Medical optimisation and prehabilitation  Balancing chronic diseases (HbA1c, COPD, cardiovascular)
Physiotherapy for muscle strengthening, respiratory and perineal preparation in case of enterocystoplasty.
Management of psycho-social needs
Treatment of anaemia 
Nutritional preparation  Preoperative immunonutrition (Oral Impact)
Systematic nutritional assessment (% weight loss, BMI, albumin, calculation of nutritional grade) 
Mechanical bowel preparation  No digestive preparation 
Duration of preoperative fasting  Clear fluids up to 2 hours before surgery 
Preoperative carbohydrate loading  50 g in the morning 2 hours before surgery 
Thromboprophylaxis  Support stockings 
Premedication  No premedication 
INTRAOPERATIVE 
Surgery:   
Minimally invasive surgery  Oncological equivalence of the minimally invasive approach with benefit on blood loss 
Pelvic drainage  Duration and removal criteria not established 
Anaesthesia:   
Prevention of hypothermia  Active heating system 
Blood volume optimisation  In the absence of intraoperative transfusion, intraoperative intravenous fluids ≤ 5 ml/kg/h. 
Locoregional anaesthesia  Thoracic epidural or IV xylocaine + TAP block 
Anaesthesia drugs  Decurarisation monitoring 
Prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting  APFEL score and dexamethasone at induction 
Protective mechanical ventilation  Tidal volume 6-8 ml/kg of ideal weight
PEEP, 6-8 cm of water 
Thromboprophylaxis  Support stockings 
Antibiotic prophylaxis  The French Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Association & The French Urology
Association Protocol 
POSTOPERATIVE 
Early removal of the nasogastric tube  Removal of the nasogastric tube immediately after surgery or in the recovery room 
Prevention of ileus  Chewing gum ≥ 3 times/day on D1 until transit is re-established 
Early hydration and nourishment  Sweetened drink or liquid nutrients ≤D1 
Urinary drainage  Ureteral catheterization: modalities and duration not established
Urethral catheterization (neo-bladder): duration not established 
Multimodal analgesia  ≥ 2 non-opioid drugs from different classes 
Early mobilisation  Seated in armchair on D1
Walking on D2 
Thromboprophylaxis  Support stockings, LMWH 

 

Recommendations: Treatment of localised MIBC  Level 
Perform a cystectomy, preceded by a neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (standard curative treatment)  Strong 
Cystectomy can be performed by open approach, simple or robot-assisted laparoscopy  Strong 
Evaluate sexual function in men and women and propose a sexual and genital preservation technique in select patients  Weak 
Perform extensive pelvic lymphadenectomy regardless of the approach for cystectomy  Strong 
Promote the implementation of Enhanced
Recovery After Surgery protocols 
Strong 
Request an oncogeriatric evaluation for MIBC in subjects over 75 years of age and/or G8 score ≤ 14.  Weak 
Propose a conservative trimodal treatment with a combination of complete TURBT, radiotherapy and radiosensitising chemotherapy in case of unifocal tumour, stage T2, without Cis or hydronephrosis.  Strong 

 

Recommendations: Perioperative chemotherapy  Level 
For neoadjuvant therapy  PS ≤ 1 and Clearance ≥ 60 ml/min  MVAC or HD-MVAC  Strong 
or GC  Weak 
PS > 1 or Clearance < 60 ml/min  No neoadjuvant chemotherapy  Strong 
To be discussed on a case-by-case basis if clearance between 50-60 ml/min (CDK-EPI)  Weak 
For adjuvant therapy (pT3-T4 and/or pN + tumour)  PS ≤ 1 and Clearance ≥60 ml/min  MVAC or GC  Strong 
PS >1 or Clearance < 60 ml/min  No adjuvant chemotherapy  Weak 
To be discussed on a case-by-case basis if clearance between 50-60 ml/min (CDK-EPI)  Weak 

 

Recommendations: First line chemotherapy  Level 
FIT patients  PS ≤ 1 and Clearance ≥ 60 ml/min  MVAC or GC  Strong 
UNFIT patients  Clearance < 60 ml/min  Carbo-Gemcitabin  Strong 
PS >1  Gemcitabin alone or Comfort Care  Weak 
Recommendations: Second line chemotherapy  Level 
FIT patients  PS < 2  Pembrolizumab  Strong 
HD MVAC or Vinflunine  Weak 
UNFIT patients  PS > 2  Comfort care  Weak 

 

Recommendations: MIBC surveillance  Level 
    Recommended tests  Frequency   
After cystectomy  If pT2  • CT TAP
• Biology* 
at 3 and 6 months
then every 6 months (for 2 years)
then every 12 months (for life) 
Weak 
  If pT3-T4 and/or pN+  • CT TAP
• Biology* 
Every 3 to 6 months (for 2 years)
then every 6 months (for 5 years)
then every 12 months (for life) 
Weak 
  If urethra in place  • Urethroscopy  annually (for 5 years)  Weak 
After conservative trimodal treatment    • Cystoscopy
• Urine cytology
• CT TAP 
Every 3 months (for 2 years)
then every 6 months (up to 5 years)
then every 12 months (for life) 
Weak 

 

[*]  Serum creatinine +/− blood electrolytes, CBC, B12 and alkaline reserve

Recommandations : facteurs de risque  Niveau 
Faire stopper l'intoxication tabagique est primordial pour réduire le risque évolutif des TVNIM  Fort 
Surveiller les travailleurs exposés à des agents cancérogènes pour la vessie par une cytologie urinaire régulièrement  Fort 

 

Recommandations : anatomopathologie  Niveau 
Utiliser la classification TNM 2017 pour définir le stade tumoral  Fort 
Utiliser les classifications Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) 1973 et 2004 pour définir le grade tumoral  Fort 
Le terme « tumeur superficielle de vessie » ne doit plus être utilisé  Fort 

 

Tableau 1 - Classification TNM 2017 des tumeurs de la vessie.
Stade T  Description  Dénomination 
pTa  Tumeur papillaire de grade variable sans infiltration de la lamina propria  TVNIM 
pTis  Tumeur plane de haut grade sans infiltration - CIS 
PT1  Tumeur papillaire de grade variable avec infiltration de la lamina propria mais sans infiltration du muscle 
pT2  Tumeur envahissant la musculeuse
pT2a Tumeur envahissant la musculeuse superficielle (moitié interne)
pT2b Tumeur envahissant la musculeuse profonde (moitié externe) 
TVIM 
pT3  Tumeur envahissant le tissu péri-vésical
pT3a Atteinte microscopique
pT3b Atteinte macroscopique (masse extravésicale) 
pT4  Tumeur envahissant l'une ou l'autre des structures suivantes : prostate, vésicules séminales, utérus, vagin, paroi pelvienne ou paroi abdominale
T4a Prostate, vésicules séminales, vagin ou utérus
T4b Paroi pelvienne ou paroi abdominale 

 

Légende :
N Ganglions lymphatiques régionaux
Nx Renseignements insuffisants pour classer l'atteinte des ganglions lymphatiques régionaux
N0 Pas d'atteinte des ganglions lymphatiques régionaux
N1 Atteinte d'un seul ganglion lymphatique pelvien (hypogastrique, obturateur, iliaque externe ou présacré)
N2 Atteinte de multiples ganglions lymphatiques pelviens (hypogastrique, obturateur, iliaque externe ou pré-sacré)
N3 Atteinte d'un (ou plusieurs) ganglion(s) lymphatique(s) iliaque(s) primitif(s)
M Métastases à distance
M0 Absence de métastase à distance
M1 Métastase(s) à distance
* yp: y : stade réévalué après un traitement néo-adjuvant (chimiothérapie ou radiothérapie)
 

Recommandations : conduite à tenir en fonction de la cytologie urinaire  Niveau 
Résultat de la cytologie  Conduite à tenir   
Matériel non satisfaisant pour évaluation (préciser la cause)  Refaire pratiquer une cytologie urinaire dans des meilleures conditions  Faible 
Cytologie négative (négative pour le carcinome urothélial de haut grade)  Pas de modification de la prise en charge  Faible 
Présence de cellules urothéliales atypiques  Éliminer une cause (infection p.ex. polymavirus, inflammation) et refaire pratiquer une cytologie urinaire dans 6 mois  Faible 
Présence de cellules urothéliales suspectes de carcinome urothélial de haut grade  Poursuite des investigations habituelles à la recherche d'une TV  Faible 
Carcinome urothélial de haut grade 
Néoplasie urothéliale de bas grade 

 

Tableau 2 - Éléments à mentionner dans le compte-rendu d'une analyse de RTUV.
Matériel analysé  Nombre de copeaux, poids, taille
% de copeaux tumoraux 
Cytologie  Grade OMS 1973 et 2004 
Histologie  Lamina propria : vu/infiltrée/autres (p.ex. granulomes épithélioïdes et gigantocellulaires)
Musculaire muqueuse : vu/infiltrée/autres
Musculeuse : vu/infiltrée/autres
Type tumeur/variant histologique
Embole lymphovasculaire
Autres lésions/lésion planes 
Immunohistochimie  En fonction 
Diagnostic/Conclusion  pTNM 2017 (pTa, pT1 ou pT ≥ 2; il n'est pas possible de préciser pT2a, pT2b ou pT3 à partir de copeaux de RTUV) 

 

Recommandations : bilan diagnostic initial  Niveau 
Réaliser une fibroscopie vésicale en cas de suspicion de cancer de la vessie non établie par un examen d'imagerie.  Fort 
La fibroscopie doit préciser le nombre, la taille, la topographie, l'aspect de la tumeur et de la muqueuse vésicale.  Fort 
Réaliser une uro-TDM ou une uro-IRM lorsque la cystoscopie révèle des tumeurs multiples et/ou trigonales ou lorsque l'examen clinique suspecte une TVIM.  Faible 
Faire une cytologie urinaire systématique pour détecter des lésions de haut grade.  Faible 
Proposer une uro-TDM ou une uro-IRM en première intention dans le bilan d'une hématurie macroscopique.  Faible 

 

Recommandations : utilisation de la luminofluorescence vésicale  Niveau 
Première résection de primodiagnostic  Toutes les tumeurs, sauf en cas de tumeur unifocale, < 3 cm avec cytologie urinaire normale  Fort 
Résection de second look   Uniquement lorsque la cytologie urinaire est suspecte de présence d'une tumeur de haut grade et la cystoscopie en lumière blanche ne révèle pas de lésion papillaire (recherche de CIS)  Fort 
Récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée comme de faible risque  Toutes situations  Fort 
Récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée comme de risque intermédiaire  Uniquement pour les récidives de taille < 3 cm et présumées de stade Ta et de Bas Grade /G1 (cytologie urinaire négative)  Fort 
Récidive d'une TVNIM initialement classée comme de haut risque  Uniquement lorsque la cytologie urinaire est suspecte de présence d'une tumeur de haut grade et la cystoscopie en lumière blanche ne révèle pas de lésion papillaire (recherche de CIS)  Fort 

 

Recommandations : RTUV de primo-diagnostic  Niveau 
La résection doit être complète et profonde (présence de faisceaux du détrusor).  Fort 
La RTUV doit être faite en monobloc, dans la mesure du possible.  Faible 
Réaliser des biopsies randomisées de la muqueuse optiquement saine en cas de cytologie urinaire positive sans lésion visible ou en cas de zones optiquement anormales évoquant un CIS.  Fort 
Lorsqu'elle est disponible, la luminofluorescence vésicale par hexaminolévulinate est recommandée lors de la première résection (outil diagnostique) de TVNIM et pour la recherche de CIS.  Fort 
Lorsqu'elle est disponible, l'imagerie en NBI est recommandée lors de la RTUV.  Fort 
Faire une IPOP, idéalement dans les 2 heures et au maximum dans les 24 heures qui suivent la première RTUV et en l'absence d'hématurie et/ou de perforation vésicale, pour :
- au maximum 7 tumeurs, < 3 cm et supposément pTaG < 2 ou T1G1 (cytologie négative);
- une tumeur unique > 3 cm et supposément pTaG < 2 ou T1G1 (cytologie négative). 
Fort 
Lorsqu'une IPOP n'est pas recommandée, mettre en place une irrigation continue de sérum physiologique après RTUV.  Faible 
Faire une analyse de l'ensemble des prélèvements de la RTUV pour le diagnostic de TV : stade, grade et histologie.  Fort 
Une RTUV de second look doit être réalisée après une RTUV estimée complète seulement en cas de tumeur de stade pT1.  Fort 

 

Tableau 3 - Stratification et traitement des TVNIM.
Risque  Critères  traitement 
Faible  Tumeur urothéliale pTa de bas grade, de moins de 3 cm, unifocale, sans antécédent de tumeur de vessie, incluant les tumeurs à faible potentiel de malignité  IPOP 
Intermédiaire  Tumeur urothéliale pTa de bas grade qui ne présente aucun des critères de haut ou très haut risque  Instillations endovésicales
- MMC ou épirubicine ou
- BCG-thérapie avec entretien d'un an 
Haut risque  Tumeur urothéliale présentant au moins un des critères suivants :
- pT1
- haut grade (G3)
- présence de CIS 
Instillations endovésicales
- BCG-thérapie avec entretien de 3 ans La tumeur doit avoir été reréséquée au moins une fois avec présence de détrusor 
Très haut risque   - pT1G3 + CIS *
- pT1G3 multifocal *
- pT1G3 > 3 cm *
- pT1G3 + envahissement lympho-vasculaire *
- pT1G3 de l'urètre prostatique
- pT1 de formes anatomopathologiques agressives  
- Proposer une cystectomie avec curage
- Instillations endovésicales
BCG-thérapie avec entretien de 3 ans
La tumeur doit avoir été reréséquée au moins une fois avec présence de détrusor  

 

[*]  Ces tumeurs peuvent être reclassées à haut risque si la dernière re-résection est < pT1 et que le muscle est vu. La cystectomie est alors optionnelle.

Recommandations : classification pronostique  Niveau 
Les TVNIM doivent être classées selon leur risque de récidive et de progression.  Fort 
Les TVNIM à faible risque justifient d'une IPOP sans traitement adjuvant complémentaire.  Fort 
Les TVNIM à risque intermédiaire justifient d'un traitement adjuvant par instillations endovésicales de chimiothérapie ou de BCG-thérapie.  Fort 
Les TVNIM à haut risque justifient d'un traitement adjuvant par instillations endovésicales de BCG-thérapie.  Fort 
Les TVNIM à très haut risque justifient d'un traitement adjuvant par instillations endovésicales de BCG-thérapie ou d'une cystectomie totale avec curage.  Fort 

 

Tableau 4 - Classification et propositions de prise en charge des effets secondaires mineurs.
Durée des effets secondaires  Sévérité  Traitement  Mesures symptomatiques/prophylactiques 
> 2 h et < 48 h  Stade I  Poursuite du BCG Mesures symptomatiques  - AINS
- Paracétamol 
≥ 48 h et < 7 jours  Stade II  Poursuite du BCG Mesures prophylactiques  - Ofloxacine 200 mg à 6 h et 18 h
- Réduction de dose à 1/3
- Temps de contact réduit à 1 h 
≥ 7 jours ou suspicion d'infection  Stade III  Interruption du BCG ≥ 1 s Mesures thérapeutiques  - Ofloxacine 400 mg/j
- Corticoïdes 0,5-1 mg/kg/j
- Isoniazide et rifampicine 

 

Tableau 5 - Effets secondaires liés aux instillations de BCG.
Mineurs  Locaux (cystite):
- hyperactivité vésicale;
- hématurie;
- incontinence urinaire;
- douleurs sus-pubiennes;
- brûlures mictionnelles.
Généraux (syndrome grippal) :
- asthénie;
- myalgie;
- fièvre < 38,5° < 48 h. 
Majeurs  - Détresse respiratoire ou circulatoire.
- Septicémie ou infection d'organe (prostate, poumon, épididyme, testicule, rein, foie, articulation).
- Insuffisance hépatique.
- Réaction allergique (rash cutané, arthralgies). 

 

Recommandations : traitements endovésicaux adjuvants  Niveau 
Faire une réduction de la diurèse pour optimiser la tolérance et l'efficacité des instillations endovésicales.  Fort 
Faire une alcalinisation des urines pour optimiser l'efficacité de la MMC.  Fort 
Ne pas faire d'alcalinisation des urines en cas d'instillation d'épirubicine.  Fort 
Faire des instillations de BCG avec un schéma d'entretien de 1 an pour les TV de risque intermédiaire et de 3 ans pour les TV de haut risque.  Fort 
Les instillations endovésicales de MMC avec entretien de 1 an sont plus efficaces que les instillations de BCG sans entretien pour réduire le risque de récidive pour les TV de risque intermédiaire.  Faible 
Les instillations de BCG sont inefficaces en cas de TV résiduelle.  Fort 
Proposer une cystectomie en première intention en cas de TV de très haut risque.  Fort 
Utiliser une check-list ou un autoquestionnaire avant chaque instillation de BCG pour l'évaluation des effets secondaires.  Faible 
Reporter l'instillation de BCG en cas de symptômes persistants au bout d'une semaine.  Fort 
En cas d'intolérance des instillations de BCG, proposer une ou plusieurs de ces options : paracétamol, AINS, ofloxacine 6 h et 18 h après l'instillation, report de l'instillation, réduction de dose jusqu'à 1/3, diminution du temps de contact. Les anticholinergiques sont inefficaces.  Fort 
L'hématurie microscopique, la leucocyturie et la bactériurie asymptomatique ne sont pas des contre-indications à la réalisation des instillations de BCG et ne nécessitent pas de traitement. La réalisation d'un ECBU avant chaque instillation est optionnelle.  Fort 
Débuter immédiatement un traitement par ofloxacine et corticoïde, puis par antituberculeux après avis spécialisé en cas d'effet secondaire majeur du BCG.  Fort 
Penser à une récidive tumorale ou à une complication devant la persistance d'une hématurie ou de signes urinaires isolés résistants au traitement et faire une cystoscopie.  Faible 

 

Tableau 6 - Modalités de suivi des TVNIM.
  Cystoscopie  Cytologie  Uro-TDM 
Risque faible  - 3e et 12e mois puis
- annuelle pendant 5 ans 
Non  Non systématique* 
Risque intermédiaire  - 3e et 6e mois puis
- tous les 6 mois pendant 2 ans puis
- annuelle pendant au moins 10 ans 
Oui 
Risque élevé  - 3e et 6e mois puis
- tous les 3 mois pendant 2 ans puis
- tous les 6 mois jusqu'à 5 ans
- puis tous les ans à vie 
Oui  Annuel 

 

[*]  La réalisation d'un scanner annuel pour les tumeurs à haut risque est recommandée.

Recommandations : surveillance des TVNIM  Niveau 
Réaliser systématiquement une cystoscopie à 3 mois, et faire des biopsies vésicales lorsque du CIS était présent avant les instillations.  Fort 
La fréquence des cystoscopies de contrôle dépend du risque de récidive et de progression. Elle doit être associée à une cytologie pour les tumeurs de haut grade. Aucun autre test urinaire ne peut remplacer ces examens.  Fort 
Pas de surveillance systématique par imagerie du haut appareil urinaire dans les TVNIM.  Faible 
Faire une uro-TDM à la recherche d'une tumeur du haut appareil dans les situations suivantes :
- en présence de symptômes évocateurs d'une TVES. Informer les patients de la nature de ces symptômes et de la nécessité de consulter;
- lors d'une récidive uni- ou multifocale d'une tumeur de haut grade;
- lors d'une récidive multifocale d'une tumeur de bras grade touchant les zones périméatiques urétérales ou le trigone;
- en présence d'une cytologie urinaire positive sans lésion vésicale visible. 
Fort 

 

Recommandations : traitement des récidives après BCG-thérapie  Niveau 
Délai récidive  Grade de la TVNIM récidivante  Traitements   
Précoce < 12 mois  Bas grade  Instillations BCG ou chimiothérapie endovésicales  Faible 
Haut grade  Cystectomie  Fort 
Tardive > 12 mois  Bas grade  Instillations BCG ou chimiothérapie endovésicales  Faible 
Haut grade  RTV second look et, en l'absence de lésion de haut grade résiduelle, Instillations endovésicales BCG  Faible 

 

Recommandations : bilan d'extension d'une TVIM  Niveau 
Faire une uro-TDM avec injection de produit de contraste iodé et temps tardif excrétoire couplé à un scanner thoracique.  Fort 
Faire une IRM de vessie multiparamétrique avant résection si cela ne retarde pas la prise en charge du patient.  Faible 

 

Tableau 7 - Protocole de réhabilitation périopératoire pour une récupération améliorée après chirurgie (RAAC).
Critères RAAC  Spécificités pour les cystectomies 
PRÉOPÉRATOIRE 
Information patients  Aide au sevrage tabagique
Information sur les dérivations urinaires et le parcours de soins 
Optimisation médicale et préhabilitation  Équilibration des pathologies chroniques (HbA1c, BPCO, cardiovasculaire)
Kinésithérapie pour renforcement musculaire, préparation respiratoire et périnéale si entérocystoplastie
Prise en charge des besoins psychosociaux
Traitement des anémies 
Préparation nutritionnelle  Immunonutrition préopératoire (Oral Impact)
Bilan nutritionnel systématique (% perte de poids, IMC, albumine, calcul du grade nutritionnel) 
Préparation mécanique du côlon  Absence de préparation digestive 
Durée du jeûne préopératoire  Liquides clairs jusqu'à 2 heures avant l'intervention 
Charge glucidique préopératoire  50 g le matin, 2 h avant l'intervention 
Thromboprophylaxie  Bas de contention 
Prémédication  Absence de prémédication 
PRÉOPÉRATOIRE 
Chirurgie   
Chirurgie mini-invasive  Équivalence carcinologique de la voie mini-invasive avec bénéfice sur les pertes sanguines 
Drainage pelvien  Durée et critères de retrait non établis 
Anesthésie   
Prévention de l'hypothermie  Système de réchauffement actif 
Optimisation de la volémie  En l'absence de transfusion peropératoire, apports liquidiens intraveineux peropératoires ≤ 5 mL/kg/h.
Pas de diurèse peropératoire 
Anesthésie locorégionale  Péridurale thoracique ou xylocaïne IV + bloc pariétal 
Médicaments de l'anesthésie  Monitorage de la décurarisation 
Prévention des nausées et vomissements postopératoires  Score d'Apfel et dexaméthasone à l'induction 
Ventilation artificielle protectrice  Volume courant 6-8 mL/kg de poids idéal
PEEP 6-8 cm d'eau 
Thromboprophylaxie  Bas de contention 
Antibioprophylaxie  Protocole SFAR-AFU 
PRÉOPÉRATOIRE 
Retrait précoce de la sonde nasogastrique  Retrait de la sonde nasogastrique en postopératoire immédiat ou en salle de réveil 
Prévention de l'iléus  Chewing-gum > 3 fois/jour à J1 jusqu'à la reprise du transit 
Réalimentation précoce  Boisson sucrée ou nutriments liquides ≤ J1 
Drainage urinaire  Sondage urétéral : modalités et durée non établies
Sondage urétral (néovessie) : durée non établie 
Analgésie multimodale  ≥ 2 molécules non morphiniques de classes différentes 
Mobilisation précoce  Levée et mise au fauteuil à J1
Marche à J2 
Thromboprophylaxie  Bas de contention, héparines de bas poids moléculaire (HBPM) 

 

Recommandations : traitement des TVIM localisées  Niveau 
Faire une cystectomie, précédée d'une chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante à base de cisplatine (traitement curatif de référence)  Fort 
Faire la cystectomie par voie ouverte ou par voie cÅ“lioscopique simple ou robot-assistée  Fort 
Faire une évaluation de la fonction sexuelle chez l'homme et la femme et proposer une technique de préservation sexuelle et génitale chez les patients bien sélectionnés  Faible 
Faire un curage ganglionnaire pelvien étendu quelle que soit la voie d'abord au cours de la cystectomie  Fort 
Favoriser la mise en place de protocoles de récupération améliorée après chirurgie  Fort 
Demander une évaluation oncogériatrique en cas de TVIM chez un sujet de plus de 75 ans et/ou si score G8 ≤ 14  Faible 
Proposer un traitement conservateur trimodal associant RTUV complète, radiothérapie et chimiothérapie radiosensibilisante en cas de tumeur unifocale, de stade T2, sans CIS ni hydronéphrose  Fort 

 

Recommandations : chimiothérapie périopératoire  Niveau 
Situation néoadjuvante  PS ≤ 1 et Clairance ≥ 60 mL/min  MVAC ou HD-MVAC  Fort 
ou GC  Faible 
PS > 1 ou Clairance < 60 mL/min  Pas de chimiothérapie néo-adjuvante  Fort 
À discuter au cas par cas si clairance entre 50-60 mL/min (CDK-EPI)  Faible 
Situation adjuvante (tumeur pT3-T4 et/ou pN+)  PS ≤ 1 et Clairance ≥ 60 mL/min  MVAC ou GC  Fort 
PS > 1 ou Clairance < 60 mL/min  Pas de chimiothérapie adjuvante  Faible 
À discuter au cas par cas si clairance entre 50-60 mL/min (CDK-EPI)  Faible 

 

Recommandations : chimiothérapie de première ligne  Niveau 
Patients fit   PS ≤ 1 Clairance ≥ 60 mL/min  MVAC ou GC  Fort 
Patients unfit   Clairance < 60 mL/min  Carbo-Gemcitabine  Fort 
PS > 1  Gemcitabine seul ou soins de confort  Faible 
Recommandations : chimiothérapie de deuxième ligne  Niveau 
Patients fit   PS < 2  Pembrolizumab  Fort 
MVAC HD ou vinflunine  Faible 
Patients unfit   PS > 2  Soins de confort  Faible 

 

Recommandations : surveillance des TVIM  Niveau 
    Examens recommandés  Fréquence   
Après cystectomie  Si pT2  • TDM TAP
• Biologie* 
À 3 et 6 mois,
puis tous les 6 mois (pendant 2 ans),
puis tous les 12 mois (à vie) 
Faible 
  Si pT3-T4 et/ou pN+  • TDM TAP
• Biologie* 
Tous les 3 à 6 mois (pendant 2 ans),
puis tous les 6 mois (pendant 5 ans),
puis tous les 12 mois (à vie) 
Faible 
  Si urètre en place  • Urétroscopie  annuelle (pendant 5 ans)  Faible 
Après traitement conservateur trimodal    • Cystoscopie
• Cytologie urinaire
• TDM TAP 
Tous les 3 mois (pendant 2 ans),
puis tous les 6 mois (jusqu'à 5 ans),
puis tous les 12 mois (à vie) 
Faible 

 

[*]  Créatinémie +/− ionogramme sanguin, NFS, B12 et réserve alcaline.

 
 

Références

 

Siegel R.L., Miller K.D., Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2020. CA Cancer J Clin 2020 ;  70 (1) : 7-30 [cross-ref]
 
Richters A., Aben K.KH., Kiemeney L.ALM. The global burden of urinary bladder cancer: an update World J Urol 2019 ;
 
Rouprêt M., Neuzillet Y., Pignot G., Compérat E., Audenet F., Houédé N., et al. Recommandations françaises du Comité de Cancérologie de l'AFU - Actualisation 2018-2020: tumeurs de la vessie [French ccAFU guidelines - Update 2018-2020: Bladder cancer]. Prog Urol 2019 ;  28 (S1) : R48-R80
 
Haute Autorité de Santé Label INCa-HAS - Surveillance médico-professionnelle des travailleurs exposés ou ayant été exposés à des agents cancérogènes chimiques: application aux cancérogènes pour la vessie La Plaine Saint-Denis: HAS (2012). 
 
Brierkey G.M., Witterkind C. TNM classification of malignant tumors UICC International Union Against Cancer New York: Wiley Blackwell and UICC (2017). 
 
Yafi F.A., Brimo F., Auger M., Aprikian A., Tanguay S., Kassouf W. Is the performance of urinary cytology as high as reported historically? A contemporary analysis in the detection and surveillance of bladder cancer. Urol Oncol 2014 ;  32 (1) : 27.e1-27-e276
 
Barkan G.A., Wojcik E.M., Nayar R., Savic-Prince S., Quek M.L., Kurtycz D.FI., et al. The Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology: The Quest to Develop a Standardized Terminology. Acta Cytol 2016 ;  60 : 185-197 [cross-ref]
 
Mbeutcha A., Lucca I., Mathieu R., Lotan Y., Shariat S.F. Current Status of Urinary Biomarkers for Detection and Surveillance of Bladder Cancer. Urol Clin North Am 2016 ;  43 (1) : 47-62 [inter-ref]
 
Compérat E.M., Burger M., Gontero P., Mostafid U.H., Palou J., Rouprêt M., et al. Grading of Urothelial Carcinoma and The New « World Health Organisation Classification of Tumours of the Urinary System and Male Genital Organs 2016 ». Eur Urol Focus 2019 ;  5 (3) : 457-466
 
Veskimae E., Espinos E.L., Bruins H.M., Yuan Y., Sylvester R., Kamat A.M., et al. What Is the Prognostic and Clinical Importance of Urothelial and Nonurothelial Histological Variants of Bladder Cancer in Predicting Oncological Outcomes in Patients with Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer? A European Association of Urology Muscle Invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel Systematic Review. Eur Urol Oncol 2019 ;  2 (6) : 625-642 [cross-ref]
 
Mari A., Kimura S., Foerster B., Abufaraj M., D'Andrea D., Hassler M., et al. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of lymphovascular invasion in bladder cancer transurethral resection specimens. BJU Int 2019 ;  123 (1) : 11-21 [cross-ref]
 
Tan T.Z., Rouanne M., Tan K.T., Huang R.Y., Thiery J.P. Molecular Subtypes of Urothelial Bladder Cancer: Results from a Meta-cohort Analysis of 2411 Tumors. Eur Urol 2019 ;  75 (3) : 423-432 [cross-ref]
 
Association française d'urologie (AFU), Société française d'hygiène hospitalière (SFHH), Société de pathologie infectieuse de langue française (SPILF). Révision des recommandations de bonne pratique pour la prise en charge et la prévention des Infections Urinaires Associées aux Soins (IUAS) de l'adulte. 2015.
 
Xiong Y., Li J., Ma S., Ge J., Zhou L., Li D., et al. A meta-analysis of narrow band imaging for the diagnosis and therapeutic outcome of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. PLoS One 2017 ;  12 (2) : e0170819
 
Kang W., Cui Z., Chen Q., Zhang D., Zhang H., Jin X. Narrow band imaging-assisted transurethral resection reduces the recurrence risk of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Oncotarget 2017 ;  8 (14) : 23880-23890 [cross-ref]
 
Lee J.Y., Cho K.S., Kang D.H., Jung H.D., Kwon J.K., Oh C.K., et al. A network meta-analysis of therapeutic outcomes after new image technology-assisted transurethral resection for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: 5-aminolaevulinic acid fluorescence vs hexylaminolevulinate fluorescence vs narrow band imaging. BMC Cancer 2015 ;  15 : 566 [cross-ref]
 
Datta S.N., Allen G.M., Evans R., Vaughton K.C., Lucas M.G. Urinary tract ultrasonography in the evaluation of haematuria--a report of over 1,000 cases. Ann R Coll Surg Engl 2002 ;  84 (3) : 203-205
 
Palou J., Rodríguez-Rubio F., Huguet J., Segarra J., Ribal M.J., Alcaraz A., et al. Multivariate analysis of clinical parameters of synchronous primary superficial bladder cancer and upper urinary tract tumor. J Urol 2005 ;  174 (3) : 859-861 [cross-ref]
 
Renard-Penna R., Rocher L., Roy C., André M., Bellin M-F, Boulay Isabelle, et al. Imaging protocols for CT urography: results of a consensus conference from the French Society of Genitourinary Imaging. Eur Radiol 2020 ;  30 (3) : 1387-1396 [cross-ref]
 
Rouvière O., Cornelis F., Brunelle S., Roy C., André M., Bellin M-F, et al. Imaging protocols for renal multiparametric MRI and MR urography: results of a consensus conference from the French Society of Genitourinary Imaging. Eur Radiol 2020 ;  30 (4) : 2103-2114
 
Abreu-Gomez J., Udare A., Shanbhogue K.P., Schieda N. Update on MR urography (MRU): technique and clinical applications. Abdom Radiol (NY) 2019 ;  44 (12) : 3800-3810 [cross-ref]
 
Zhai N., Wang Y-H, Zhu L-M, Wang J-H, Sun X-H, Hu X-B, et al. Sensitivity and Specificity of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diagnosis of Bladder Cancers. Clin Invest Med 2015 ;  38 (4) : e173-e184 [cross-ref]
 
Yoshida S., Takahara T., Kwee T.C., Waseda Y., Kobayashi S., Fujii Y. DWI as an Imaging Biomarker for Bladder Cancer. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2017 ;  208 (6) : 1218-1228 [cross-ref]
 
Gandhi N., Krishna S., Booth C.M., Breau R.H., Flood T.A., Morgan S.C., et al. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for tumour staging of bladder cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. BJU Int 2018 ;  122 (5) : 744-753 [cross-ref]
 
Zhang N., Wang X., Wang C., Chen S., Wu J., Zhang G., et al. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Tumor Staging of Bladder Cancer: Meta-Analysis. Front Oncol 2019 ;  9 : 981
 
Panebianco V., Narumi Y., Altun E., Bochner B., Efstathiou J.A., Hafeez S., et al. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Bladder Cancer: Development of VI-RADS (Vesical Imaging-Reporting And Data System). Eur Urol 2018 ;  74 (3) : 294-306 [cross-ref]
 
Luo C., Huang B., Wu Y., Chen J., Chen L. Use of Vesical Imaging-Reporting and Data System (VI-RADS) for detecting the muscle invasion of bladder cancer: a diagnostic meta-analysis. Eur Radiol 2020 ;  30 (8) : 4606-4614 [cross-ref]
 
Woo S., Panebianco V., Narumi Y., Del Giudice F., Muglia V.F., Takeuchi M., et al. Diagnostic Performance of Vesical Imaging Reporting and Data System for the Prediction of Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Eur Urol Oncol 2020 ;  3 (3) : 306-315 [cross-ref]
 
Pecoraro M., Takeuchi M., Vargas H.A., Muglia V.F., Cipollari S., Catalanpo C., et al. Overview of VI-RADS in Bladder Cancer. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2020 ;  214 (6) : 1259-1268 [cross-ref]
 
Marchioni M., Primiceri G., Delli Pizzi A., Basilico R., Berardinelli F., Mincuzzi E., et al. Could Bladder Multiparametric MRI Be Introduced in Routine Clinical Practice? Role of the New VI-RADS Score: Results From a Prospective Study. Clin Genitourin Cancer 2020 ;  18 (5) : 409-415
 
Margolis D.JA., Hu J.C. Vying for Standardization of Bladder Cancer MRI Interpretation and Reporting: VI-RADS. Radiology 2019 ;  291 (3) : 675-676 [cross-ref]
 
Association française d'urologie (AFU), Société française d'hygiène hospitalière (SFHH), Société de pathologie infectieuse de langue française (SPILF). Révision des recommandations de bonne pratique pour la prise en charge et la prévention des Infections Urinaires Associées aux Soins (IUAS) de l'adulte. 2015
 
Wu Y-P, Lin T-T, Chen S-H, Xu N., Wei Y., Huang J-B, et al. Comparison of the efficacy and feasibility of en bloc transurethral resection of bladder tumor versus conventional transurethral resection of bladder tumor: A meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore) 2016 ;  95 (45) : e5372
 
Kramer M.W., Altieri V., Hurle R., Lusuardi L., Merseburger A.S., Rassweiler J., et al. Current Evidence of Transurethral En-bloc Resection of Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer. Eur Urol Focus 2017 ;  3 (6) : 567-576 [cross-ref]
 
Yang H., Lin J., Gao P., He Z., Kuang X., Li X., et al. Is the En Bloc Transurethral Resection More Effective than Conventional Transurethral Resection for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer? A Systematic Review and Meta. Urol Int 2020 ;  104 (5-6) : 402-409 [cross-ref]
 
Zhao C., Tang K., Yang H., Xia D., Chen Z. Bipolar Versus Monopolar Transurethral Resection of Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis. J Endourol 2016 ;  30 (1) : 5-12 [cross-ref]
 
Yang H., Wang N., Han S., Male M., Zhao C., Yao D., et al. Comparison of the efficacy and feasibility of laser enucleation of bladder tumor versus transurethral resection of bladder tumor: a meta-analysis. Lasers Med Sci 2017 ;  32 (9) : 2005-2012 [cross-ref]
 
Subiela J.D., Palou J., Esquinas C., Fernandez Gómez J.M., Rodriguez Faba O. Clinical usefulness of random biopsies in diagnosis and treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Utilidad clinica de las biopsias aleatorias en el diagnóstico y tratamiento del tumor vesical no-músculo invasivo: revision sistemática y metaanálisis. Actas Urol Esp 2018 ;  42 (5) : 285-298 [cross-ref]
 
Zhou Z., Zhao S., Lu Y., Wu J., Li Y., Gao Z., et al. Meta-analysis of efficacy and safety of continuous saline bladder irrigation compared with intravesical chemotherapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumors. World J Urol 2019 ;  37 (6) : 1075-1084 [cross-ref]
 
Burger M., Grossman H.B., Droller M., Schmidbauer J., Hermann G., Drăgoescu O., et al. Photodynamic diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer with hexaminolevulinate cystoscopy: a meta-analysis of detection and recurrence based on raw data. Eur Urol 2013 ;  64 (5) : 846-854 [cross-ref]
 
Rouprêt M., Malavaud B., Molinier L., Leleu H., Blachier M., Marteau F. Coût-efficacité de la résection transurétrale de vessie en lumière bleue chez les patients atteints d'un cancer de la vessie non infiltrant en France. Prog Urol 2015 ;  25 (5) : 256-264 [inter-ref]
 
Kang W., Cui Z., Chen Q., Zhang D., Zhang H., Jin X. Narrow band imaging-assisted transurethral resection reduces the recurrence risk of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Oncotarget 2017 ;  8 (4) : 23880-23890 [cross-ref]
 
Rouprêt M., Neuzillet Y., Larré S., Pignot G., Coloby P., Rébillard X., et al. Recommandations du comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie (CC-AFU) pour la bonne pratique des instillations endovésicales de BCG et de mytomycine C dans le traitement des tumeurs de la vessie n'envahissant pas le muscle (TVNIM) [Guidelines for good practice of intravesical instillations of BCG and mitomycin C from the French national cancer committee (CC-AFU) for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer]. Prog Urol 2012 ;  22 (15) : 920-931
 
Sylvester R.J., Oosterlinck W., Holmang S., Sydes M.R., Birtle A., Gudjonsson S., et al. Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials Comparing a Single Immediate Instillation of Chemotherapy After Transurethral Resection with Transurethral Resection Alone in Patients with Stage pTa-pT1 Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder: Which Patients Benefit from the Instillation? Eur Urol 2016 ;  69 (2) : 231-244 [cross-ref]
 
Naselli A., Hurle R., Paparella S., Buffi N.M., Lughezzani G., Lista G., et al. Role of Restaging Transurethral Resection for T1 Non-muscle invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Eur Urol Focus 2018 ;  4 (4) : 558-567 [cross-ref]
 
Sylvester R.J., van der Meijden A.PM., Oosterlinck W., Witjes J.A., Bouffioux C., Denis L., et al. Predicting recurrence and progression in individual patients with stage Ta T1 bladder cancer using EORTC risk tables: a combined analysis of 2596 patients from seven EORTC trials. Eur Urol 2006 ;  49 (3) : 465-466
 
Fernandez-Gomez J., Madero R., Solsona E., Unda M., Martinez-Pineiro L., Gonzalez M., et al. Predicting nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer recurrence and progression in patients treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin: the CUETO scoring model. J Urol 2009 ;  182 (5) : 2195-2203 [cross-ref]
 
Oddens J., Brausi M., Sylvester R., Bono A., van de Beek C., van Andel G., et al. Final results of an EORTC-GU cancers group randomized study of maintenance bacillus Calmette-Guérin in intermediate- and high-risk Ta, T1 papillary carcinoma of the urinary bladder: one-third dose versus full dose and 1 year versus 3 years of maintenance. Eur Urol 2013 ;  63 (3) : 462-472 [cross-ref]
 
Gontero P., Sylvester R., Pisano F., Joniau S., Vander Eeckt K., Serretta V., et al. Prognostic factors and risk groups in T1G3 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients initially treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin: results of a retrospective multicenter study of 2451 patients. Eur Urol 2015 ;  67 (1) : 74-82 [cross-ref]
 
Ge P., Wang L., Lu M., Mao L., Li W., Wen R., et al. Oncological Outcome of Primary and Secondary Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Sci Rep 2018 ;  8 (1) : 7543
 
Koga H., Kuroiwa K., Yamaguchi A., Osada Y., Tsuneyoshi M., Naito S. A randomized controlled trial of short-term versus long-term prophylactic intravesical instillation chemotherapy for recurrence after transurethral resection of Ta/T1 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. J Urol 2004 ;  171 (1) : 153-157 [cross-ref]
 
Babjuk M., Burger M., Compérat E.M., Gontero P., Mostafid U.H., Palou J., et al. European Association of Urology Guidelines on Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (TaT1 and Carcinoma In Situ) - 2019 Update. Eur Urol 2019 ;  76 (5) : 639-657 [cross-ref]
 
Arends T.J., Nativ O., Maffezzini M., de Cobelli O., Canepa G., Verweij F., et al. Results of a Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing Intravesical Chemohyperthermia with Mitomycin C Versus Bacillus Calmette-Guérin for Adjuvant Treatment of Patients with Intermediate- and High-risk Non-Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer. Eur Urol 2016 ;  69 (6) : 1046-1052 [cross-ref]
 
Tan W.S., Panchal A., Buckley L., Devall A.J., Loubière L.S., Pape A.M., et al. Radiofrequency-induced Thermo-chemotherapy Effect Versus a Second Course of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin or Institutional Standard in Patients with Recurrence of Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer Following Induction or Maintenance Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Therapy (HYMN): A Phase III, Open-label, Randomised Controlled Trial. Eur Urol 2019 ;  75 (1) : 63-71 [cross-ref]
 
de Jong J.J., Hendricksen K., Rosier M., Mostafid H., Boormans J.L. Hyperthermic Intravesical Chemotherapy for BCG Unresponsive Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients. Bladder Cancer. 2018 ;  4 (4) : 395-401 [cross-ref]
 
Poletajew S., Zapata P., Radziszewski P. Safety and Efficacy of Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Immunotherapy in Patients with Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Presenting with Asymptomatic Bacteriuria: A Systematic Review. Urol Int 2017 ;  99 (1) : 1-5 [cross-ref]
 
Neuzillet Y., Rouprêt M., Wallerand H., Pignot G., Larré S., Irani J., et al. Diagnostic et prise en charge des événements indésirables survenant au décours des instillations endovésicales de BCG pour le traitement des tumeurs de vessie n'infiltrant pas le muscle (TVNIM): revue du comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie [Diagnosis and management of adverse events occuring during BCG therapy for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC): review of the Cancer Committee of the French Association of Urology]. Prog Urol 2012 ;  22 (16) : 989-998 [inter-ref]
 
Rieken M., Shariat S.F., Kluth L., Kluth L., Crivelli J.J., Abufaraj M., et al. Comparison of the EORTC tables and the EAU categories for risk stratification of patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. Urol Oncol 2018;36(1):8.e17-8.e24. [59] Lotan Y, Bivalacqua TJ, Downs T, Huang W, Jones J, Kamat AM, et al. Blue light flexible cystoscopy with hexaminolevulinate in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: review of the clinical evidence and consensus statement on optimal use in the USA - update 2018. Nat Rev Urol 2019 ;  16 (6) : 377-386
 
Picozzi S., Ricci C., Gaeta M., Ratti D., Macchi A., Casellato S., et al. Upper urinary tract recurrence following radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: a meta-analysis on 13,185 patients. J Urol 2012 ;  188 (6) : 2046-2054 [cross-ref]
 
Hernandez V., Llorente C., de la Pena E., Pérez-Fernández E., Guijarro A., Sola I. Long-term oncological outcomes of an active surveillance program in recurrent low grade Ta bladder cancer. Urol Oncol 2016 ;  34 (4) : 165.e19-165.e23
 
Hurle R., Lazzeri M., Vanni E., Lughezzani G., Buffi N., Casale P., et al. Active Surveillance for Low Risk Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Confirmatory and Resource Consumption Study from the BIAS Project. J Urol 2018 ;  199 (2) : 401-406 [cross-ref]
 
Hurle R., Colombo P., Lazzeri M., Lughezzani G., Buffi N.M., Saita A., et al. Pathological Outcomes for Patients Who Failed To Remain Under Active Surveillance for Low-risk Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: Update and Results from the Bladder Cancer Italian Active Surveillance Project. Eur Urol Oncol 2018 ;  1 (5) : 437-442 [cross-ref]
 
Herr H.W., Donat S.M., Reuter V.E. Management of low grade papillary bladder tumors. J Urol 2007 ;  178 (4) : 1201-1205 [cross-ref]
 
Planelles Gómez J., Olmos Sánchez L., Cardosa Benet J.J., Martinez López E., Vidal Moreno J.F. Holmium YAG Photocoagulation: Safe and Economical Alternative to Transurethral Resection in Small Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Tumors. J Endourol 2017 ;  31 (7) : 674-678
 
Rivero Guerra Á, Fernández Aparicio T., Barceló Bayonas I., Martínez A.P., Guillermo V.M., Peralta D.J., et al. Outpatient Holmium laser fulguration: A safe procedure for treatment of recurrence of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Fulguración ambulatoria con láser Holmium: Un procedimiento seguro para el tratamiento de la recidiva del carcinoma vesical no músculo infiltrante. Actas Urol Esp 2018 ;  42 (5) : 309-315 [cross-ref]
 
Mmeje C.O., Guo C.C., Shah J.B., Navai N., Grossman H.B., Dinney C.P., et al. Papillary Recurrence of Bladder Cancer at First Evaluation after Induction Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Therapy: Implication for Clinical Trial Design. Eur Urol 2016 ;  70 (5) : 778-785 [cross-ref]
 
Tan W.S., Panchal A., Buckley L., Devall A.J., Loubière L.S., Pope A.M., et al. Radiofrequency-induced Thermo-chemotherapy Effect Versus a Second Course of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin or Institutional Standard in Patients with Recurrence of Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer Following Induction or Maintenance Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Therapy (HYMN): A Phase III, Open-label, Randomised Controlled Trial. Eur Urol 2019 ;  75 (1) : 63-71 [cross-ref]
 
Lamm D.L., Blumenstein B.A., Crissman J.D., Montie J.E., Gottesman J.E., Lowe B.A., et al. Maintenance bacillus Calmette-Guérin immunotherapy for recurrent TA, T1 and carcinoma in situ transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder: a randomized Southwest Oncology Group Study. J Urol 2000 ;  163 (4) : 1124-1129 [cross-ref]
 
Giannarini G., Birkhäuser F.D., Recker F., Thalmann G.N., Studer U.E. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin failure in patients with non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder may be due to the urologist's failure to detect urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract and urethra. Eur Urol 2014 ;  65 (4) : 825-831 [cross-ref]
 
Casey R.G., Catto J.W., Cheng L., Cookson M.S., Herr H., Shariat S., et al. Diagnosis and management of urothelial carcinoma in situ of the lower urinary tract: a systematic review. Eur Urol 2015 ;  67 (5) : 876-888 [cross-ref]
 
Kundra V., Silverman P.M. Imaging in oncology from the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Imaging in the diagnosis, staging, and follow-up of cancer of the urinary bladder. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2003 ;  180 (4) : 1045-1054 [cross-ref]
 
Vikram R., Sandler C.M., Ng C.S. Imaging and staging of transitional cell carcinoma. Part 1. Lower urinary tract. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2009 ;  192 (6) : 1481-1487 [cross-ref]
 
Oz I.I., Altinbas N.K., Serifoglu I., Oz E.B., Yagci C. The role of computerized tomography in the assessment of perivesical invasion in bladder cancer. Pol J Radiol 2016 ;  81 : 281-287 [cross-ref]
 
Kim J.K., Park S.Y., Ahn H.J., Kim C.S., Cho K.S. Bladder cancer: analysis of multi-detector row helical CT enhancement pattern and accuracy in tumor detection and perivesical staging. Radiology 2004 ;  231 : 725-731 [cross-ref]
 
Kim B., Semelka R.C., Ascher S.M., Chalpin D.B., Carroll P.R., Hricak H. Bladder tumor staging: comparison of contrast-enhanced CT, T1 - and T2-weighted MR imaging, dynamic gadolinium-enhanced imaging, and late gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Radiology 1994 ;  193 (1) : 239-245 [cross-ref]
 
Husband J.E., Olliff J.F., Williams M.P., Heron C.W., Cherryman G.R. Bladder cancer: staging with CT and MR imaging. Radiology 1989 ;  173 (2) : 435-440 [cross-ref]
 
Baltaci S., Resorlu B., Yagci C., Turkolmez K., Gogus C., Beduk Y. Computerized tomography for detecting perivesical infiltration and lymph node metastasis in invasive bladder carcinoma Urol Int 2008 ;  81 (4) : 399-402 [cross-ref]
 
Lodde M., Lacombe L., Friede J., Morin F., Saourine A., Fradet Y. Evaluation of fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography with computed tomography for staging of urothelial carcinoma. BJU Int 2010 ;  106 (5) : 658-663 [cross-ref]
 
Picchio M., Treiber U., Beer A.J., Metz S., Bössner P., van Randenborgh H., et al. Value of 11C-choline PET and contrast-enhanced CT for staging of bladder cancer: correlation with histopathologic findings. J Nucl Med 2006 ;  47 (6) : 938-944
 
Horn T., Zahel T., Adt N., Schmid S.C., Heck M.M., Thalgott M.K., et al. Evaluation of computed tomography for lymph node staging in bladder cancer prior to radical cystectomy. Urol Int 2016 ;  96 (1) : 51-56 [cross-ref]
 
Gandhi N., Krishna S., Booth C.M., Breau R.H., Flood T.A., Morgan S.C., et al. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for tumour staging of bladder cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. BJU Int 2018 ;  122 (5) : 744-753 [cross-ref]
 
Zhang N., Wang X., Wang C., Chen S., Wu J., Zhang G., et al. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Tumor Staging of Bladder Cancer: Meta-Analysis. Front Oncol 2019 ;  9 : 981
 
Huang L., Kong Q., Liu Z., Wang J., Kang Z., Zhu Y. The Diagnostic Value of MR Imaging in Differentiating T Staging of Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis. Radiology 2018 ;  286 (2) : 502-511 [cross-ref]
 
Woo S., Suh C.H., Kim S.Y., Cho J.Y., Kim SH. Diagnostic performance of MRI for prediction of muscle-invasiveness of bladder cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Radiol 2017 ;  95 : 46-55 [cross-ref]
 
Luo C., Huang B., Wu Y., Chen J., Chen L. Use of Vesical Imaging-Reporting and Data System (VI-RADS) for detecting the muscle invasion of bladder cancer: a diagnostic meta-analysis. Eur Radiol 2020 ;  30 (8) : 4606-4614 [cross-ref]
 
Woo S., Panebianco V., Narumi Y., Del Giudice F., Muglia V.F., Takeuchi M., et al. Diagnostic Performance of Vesical Imaging Reporting and Data System for the Prediction of Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Eur Urol Oncol 2020 ;  3 (3) : 306-315 [cross-ref]
 
Pecoraro M., Takeuchi M., Vargas H.A., Muglia V.F., Cipollari S., Catalano C., et al. Overview of VI-RADS in Bladder Cancer. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2020 ;  214 (6) : 1259-1268 [cross-ref]
 
Marchioni M., Primiceri G., Delli Pizzi A., Basilico R., Berardinelli F., Mincuzzi E., et al. Could Bladder Multiparametric MRI Be Introduced in Routine Clinical Practice? Role of the New VI-RADS Score: Results From a Prospective Study. Clin Genitourin Cancer 2020 ;  18 (5) : 409-415
 
Margolis D.JA., Hu JC. Vying for Standardization of Bladder Cancer MRI Interpretation and Reporting: VI-RADS. Radiology 2019;291:6756676. + Koga F. What are roles of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to transurethral resection of bladder tumor? Transl Androl Urol 2019 ;  8 : 290-291
 
Braendengen M., Winderen M., Fossa SD. Clinical significance of routine pre-cystectomy bone scans in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Br J Urol 1996 ;  77 (1) : 36-40 [cross-ref]
 
Heidenreich A., Albers P., Classen J., Graefen M., Gschwend J., Kotzerke J., et al. Imaging studies in metastatic urogenital cancer patients undergoing systemic therapy: Recommendations of a multidisciplinary consensus meeting of the Association of Urological Oncology of the German Cancer Society. Urol Int 2010 ;  85 (1) : 1-10 [cross-ref]
 
Dason S., Wong N.C., Donahue T.F., Meier A., Zheng J., Mannelli L., et al. Utility of routine preoperative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in identifying pathologic lymph node metastases at radical cystectomy. J Urol 2020 ;  204 (2) : 254-259 [cross-ref]
 
Altun E. MR Imaging of the Urinary Bladder: Added Value of PET-MR Imaging. Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am 2019 ;  27 : 105-115 [cross-ref]
 
Eulitt P.J., Altun E., Sheikh A., Wong T.Z., Woods M.E., Rose T.L., et al. Pilot Study of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET)/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Staging of Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (MIBC). Clin Genitourin Cancer 2020 ;  18 (5) : 378-386
 
Soubra A., Hayward D., Dahm P., Goldfarb R., Froehlich J., Jha G., et al. The diagnostic accuracy of 18F-fluoro deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography in staging bladder cancer: a single-institution study and a systematic review with meta-analysis. World J Urol 2016 ;  34 : 1229-1237 [cross-ref]
 
Crozier J., Papa N., Perera M., Ngo B., Bolton D., Sengupta S., et al. Comparative sensitivity and specificity of imaging modalities in staging bladder cancer prior to radical cystectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. World J Urol 2019 ;  37 (4) : 667-690 [cross-ref]
 
Lu Y.Y., Chen J.H., Liang J.A., Wang H.Y., Lin C.C., Lin W.Y., et al. Clinical value of FDG PET or PET/ CT in urinary bladder cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Radiol 2012 ;  81 (9) : 2411-2416 [cross-ref]
 
Yin M., Joshi M., Meijer R.P., Glantz M., Holder S., Harvey H.A., et al. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Two-Step Meta-Analysis. Oncologist 2016 ;  21 (6) : 708-715 [cross-ref]
 
Witjes JA, Bruins HM, Cathomas R, Compérat EM, Cowan NC, Gakis G, et al. European Association of Urology Guidelines on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Summary of the 2020 Guidelines. Eur Urol 2020. pii: S0302-2838(20)30230-X. [Epub ahead of print] Review.
 
Sanchez-Ortiz R.F., Huang W.C., Mick R., Van Arsdalen K.N., Wein A.J., Malkowicz SB. An interval longer than 12 weeks between the diagnosis of muscle invasion and cystectomy is associated with worse outcome in bladder carcinoma. J Urol 2003 ;  169 (1) : 110-115 [cross-ref]
 
Audenet F., Sfakianos J.P., Waingankar N., Ruel N.H., Galsky M.D., Yuh B.E., et al. A Delay ≥8 Weeks to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Before Radical Cystectomy Increases the Risk of Upstaging. Urol Oncol 2019 ;  37 (2) : 116-122 [cross-ref]
 
Mmeje C.O., Benson C.R., Nogueras-González G.M., Jayaratna I.S., Gao J., Siefker-Radtke A.O., et al. Determining the optimal time for radical cystectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. BJU Int 2018 ;  122 (1) : 89-98 [cross-ref]
 
Boeri L., Soligo M., Frank I., Boorjian S.A., Thompson R.H., Tollefson M., et al. Delaying Radical Cystectomy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer Is Associated With Adverse Survival Outcomes. Eur Urol Oncol 2019 ;  2 (4) : 390-396 [cross-ref]
 
Venkatramani V., Reis I.M., Castle E.P., Gonzalgo M.L., Woods M.E., Svatek R.S., et al. Predictors of Recurrence, and Progression-Free and Overall Survival Following Open Versus Robotic Radical Cystectomy: Analysis From the RAZOR Trial With a 3-Year Followup. J Urol 2020 ;  203 (3) : 522-529 [cross-ref]
 
Khan M.S., Omar K., Ahmed K., Gan C., Van Hemelrijck M., Nair R., et al. Long-term Oncologcal Outcomes From an Early Phase Randomised Controlled Three-arm Trial of Open, Robotic, and Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy (CORAL). Eur Urol 2020 ;  77 (1) : 110-118 [cross-ref]
 
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Bladder Cancer Surgical Trials Group.Bochner B.H., Sjoberg D.D., Laudone V.P. A randomized trial of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy. N Engl J Med 2014 ;  371 (4) : 389-390 [cross-ref]
 
Raza S.J., Wilson T., Peabody J.O., Wiklund P., Scherr D.S., Al-Daghmin A., et al. Long-term oncologic outcomes following robot-assisted radical cystectomy: results from the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium. Eur Urol 2015 ;  68 (4) : 721-728 [cross-ref]
 
Rai B.P., Bondad J., Vasdev N., Adshead J., Lane T., Ahmed K., et al. Robotic Versus Open Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer in Adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 ;  4 (4) : CD011903
 
Bochner B.H., Dalbagni G., Sjoberg D.D., Silberstein J., Keren Paz G.E., Donat S.M., et al. Comparing Open Radical Cystectomy and Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Eur Urol 2015 ;  67 (6) : 1042-1050 [cross-ref]
 
Novara G., Catto J.WF., Wilson T., Annerstedt M., Chan K., Murphy D.G., et al. Systematic review and cumulative analysis of perioperative outcomes and complications after robot-assisted radical cystectomy. Eur Urol 2015 ;  67 (3) : 376-401 [cross-ref]
 
Rozet F., Lesur G., Cathelineau X., Barret E., Smyth G., Soon S., et al. Oncological evaluation of prostate sparing cystectomy: the Montsouris long-term results. J Urol 2008 ;  179 : 2170-2174 [cross-ref]
 
Ali-El-Dein B., Abdel-Latif M., Mosbah A., Eraky I., Shaaban A.A., Taha N.M., et al. Secondary malignant involvement of gynecologic organs in radical cystectomy specimens in women: is it mandatory to remove these organs routinely? J Urol 2004 ;  172 (2) : 885-887 [cross-ref]
 
Gakis G., Schilling D., Perner S., Schwentner C., Sievert K.D., Stenzl A. Sequential Resection of Malignant Ureteral Margins at Radical Cystectomy: A Critical Assessment of the Value of Frozen Section Analysis. World J Urol 2011 ;  29 (4) : 451-456 [cross-ref]
 
Masson-Lecomte A., Francois T., Vordos D., Cordonnier C., Allory Y., Desgrandchamps F., et al. Predictive Factors for Final Pathologic Ureteral Sections on 700 Radical Cystectomy Specimens: Implications for Intraoperative Frozen Section Decision-Making. Urol Oncol 2017 ;  35 (11) : 659.e1-659.e6
 
Spiess P.E., Kassouf W., Brown G., Highshaw R., Wang X., Do K.A., et al. Immediate Versus Staged Urethrectomy in Patients at High Risk of Urethral Recurrence: Is There a Benefit to Either Approach? Urology 2006 ;  67 (3) : 466-471 [inter-ref]
 
Larré S., Quintens H., Houédé N., Comperat E., Roy C., Pignot G., et al. Intérêt du curage ganglionnaire dans les tumeurs urothéliales infiltrantes de la vessie (TVIM) et de la voie excrétrice supérieure (TVES): article de revue du Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie. Prog Urol 2012 ;  22 : 380-387
 
Bruins H.M., Veskimäe E., Hernandez V., Imamura M., Neuberger M.M., Dahm P., et al. The impact of the extent of lymphadenectomy on oncologic outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: a systematic review. Eur Urol 2014 ;  66 (6) : 1065-1077 [cross-ref]
 
Gschwend J.E., Heck M.M., Lehmann J., Rübben H., Albers P., Wolff J.M., et al. Extended Versus Limited Lymph Node Dissection in Bladder Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Cystectomy: Survival Results From a Prospective, Randomized Trial. Eur Urol 2019 ;  75 (4) : 604-611 [cross-ref]
 
Jacobs B.L., Daignault S., Lee C.T., Hafez K.S., Montgomery J.S., Montie J.E., et al. Prostate Capsule Sparing Versus Nerve Sparing Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Trial. J Urol 2015 ;  193 (1) : 64-70 [cross-ref]
 
Veskimäe E., Neuzillet Y., Rouanne M., MacLennan S., Lam T.BL., Yuan Y., et al. Systematic Review of the Oncological and Functional Outcomes of Pelvic Organ-Preserving Radical Cystectomy (RC) Compared With Standard RC in Women Who Undergo Curative Surgery and Orthotopic Neobladder Substitution for Bladder Cancer. BJU Int 2017 ;  120 (1) : 12-24
 
Kamoun A., de Reyniès A., Allory Y., Sjödahl G., Robertson A.G., Seiler R., et al. A Consensus Molecular Classification of Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer. Eur Urol 2020 ;  77 (4) : 420-433 [cross-ref]
 
Poinas G., Blache J.L., Kassab-Chahmi D., Evrard P.L., Artus P.M., Alfonsi P., et al. Version courte des recommandations de la récupération ameliorée après chirurgie (RAAC) pour la cystectomie: mesures techniques. Prog Urol 2019 ;  29 (2) : 63-75 [cross-ref]
 
Karl A., Buchner A., Becker A., Staehler M., Seitz M., Khoder W., et al. A New Concept for Early Recovery After Surgery for Patients Undergoing Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer: Results of a Prospective Randomized Study. J Urol 2014 ;  191 (2) : 335-340 [cross-ref]
 
Tan W.S., Tan M.Y., Lamb B.W., Sridhar A., Mohammed A., Baker H., et al. Intracorporeal Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy, Together With an Enhanced Recovery Programme, Improves Postoperative Outcomes by Aggregating Marginal Gains. BJU Int 2018 ;  121 (4) : 632-639 [cross-ref]
 
Soubeyran P., Bellera C., Goyard J., Heitz D., Curé H., Rousselot H., et al. Screening for vulnerability in older cancer patients: the ONCODAGE Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study. PLoS One 2014 ;  9 (12) : e115060
 
Efstathiou J.A., Spiegel D.Y., Shipley W.U., Heney N.M., Kaufman D.S., Niemierko A., et al. Long-term outcomes of selective bladder preservation by combined-modality therapy for invasive bladder cancer: the MGH experience. Eur Urol 2012 ;  61 (4) : 705-711 [cross-ref]
 
Rödel C., Weiss C. Organ-sparing multimodality treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: can we continue to ignore the evidence? J Clin Oncol 2014 ;  32 (34) : 3787-3788
 
Ploussard G., Daneshmand S., Efstathiou J.A., Herr H.W., James N.D., Rödel C.M., et al. Critical analysis of bladder sparing with trimodal therapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a systematic review. Eur Urol 2014 ;  66 (1) : 120-137 [cross-ref]
 
Fahmy O., Khairul-Asri M.G., Schubert T., Renninger M., Malek R., Kübler H., et al. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the oncological long-term outcomes after trimodality therapy and radical cystectomy with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Urol Oncol 2018 ;  36 (2) : 43-53 [cross-ref]
 
Mak R.H., Hunt D., Shipley W.U., Efstathiou J.A., Tester W.J., Hagan M.P., et al. Long-term outcomes in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer after selective bladder-preserving combined-modality therapy: a pooled analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols 8802, 8903, 9506, 9706, 9906, and 0233. J Clin Oncol 2014 ;  32 (34) : 3801-3809 [cross-ref]
 
Garci-Perdomo H.A., Montes-Cardona C.E., Guacheta M., Castillo D.F., Reis LO. Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer Organ-Preserving Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. World J Urol 2018 ;  36 (12) : 1997-2008
 
Seisen T., Sun M., Lipsitz S.R., Abdollah F., Leow J.L., Menon M., et al. Comparative Effectiveness of Trimodal Therapy Versus Radical Cystectomy for Localized Muscle-invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder. Eur Urol 2017 ;  72 (4) : 483-487 [cross-ref]
 
Ritch C.R., Balise R., Prakash N.S., Alonzo D., Almengo K., Alameddine M., et al. Propensity Matched Comparative Analysis of Survival Following Chemoradiation or Radical Cystectomy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer. BJU Int 2018 ;  121 (5) : 745-751
 
Cahn D.B., Handorf E.A., Ghiraldi E.M., Ristau B.T., Geynisman D.M., Churilla T.M., et al. Contemporary Use Trends and Survival Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Radical Cystectomy or Bladder-Preservation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer. Cancer 2017 ;  123 (22) : 4337-4345 [cross-ref]
 
Whalley D., Caine H., McCloud P., Guo L., Kneebone A., Eade T. Promising Results With Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer. Radiat Oncol 2015 ;  10 : 205
 
Khalifa J, Pignot G, Culine S, Belhomme S, Crehange G, Roupret M, et al. GETUG-AFU recommendations for planning and delivery of radical radiotherapy for localized urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. 2020 (in press).
 
Krause F.S., Walter B., Ott O.J., Häberle L., Weiss C., Rödel C., et al. 15-year survival rates after transurethral resection and radiochemotherapy or radiation in bladder cancer treatment. Anticancer Res 2011 ;  31 (3) : 985-990
 
James N.D., Hussain S.A., Hall E., Jenkins P., Tremlett J., Rawlings C., et al. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. N Engl J Med 2012 ;  366 (16) : 1477-1488 [cross-ref]
 
Coen J.J., Zhang P., Saylor P.J., Lee C.T., Wu C.L., Parker W., et al. Bladder Preservation With Twice-a-Day Radiation Plus Fluorouracil/Cisplatin or Once Daily Radiation Plus Gemcitabine for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: NRG/RTOG 0712-A Randomized Phase II Trial. J Clin Oncol 2019 ;  37 (1) : 44-51 [cross-ref]
 
Caffo O., Thompson C., De Santis M., Krageli B., Hamstra D.A., Azria D., et al. Concurrent Gemcitabine and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Pooled Individual Data Analysis of Eight Phase I-II Trials. Radiother Oncol 2016 ;  121 (2) : 193-198 [cross-ref]
 
Jiang D.M., Jiang H., Chung P.WM., Zlotta A.R., Fleshner N.E., Bristow R.G., et al. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Before Bladder-Sparing Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer. Clin Genitourin Cancer 2019 ;  17 (1) : 38-45 [cross-ref]
 
Cognetti F., Ruggeri E.M., Felici A., Gallucci M., Muto G., Pollera C.F., et al. Adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine versus chemotherapy at relapse in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer submitted to radical cystectomy: an Italian, multicenter, randomized phase III trial. Ann Oncol 2012 ;  23 (3) : 695-700 [cross-ref]
 
Sternberg C.N., Skoneczna I., Kerst J.M., Albers P., Fosså S.D., Agerbæk M., et al. Immediate versus deferred chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3 - pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (EORTC 30994): an intergroup, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol 2015 ;  16 (1) : 76-86 [inter-ref]
 
Galsky M.D., Stensland K.D., Moshier E., Sfakianos J.P., McBride R.B., Tsao C.K., et al. Effectiveness of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Bladder Cancer. J Clin Oncol 2016 ;  34 (8) : 825-832 [cross-ref]
 
Zaghloul M.S., Christodouleas J.P., Smith A., Abdallah A., William H., Khaled H.M., et al. Adjuvant Sandwich Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy vs Adjuvant Chemotherapy Alone for Locally Advanced Bladder Cancer After Radical Cystectomy: A Randomized Phase 2 Trial. JAMA Surg 2018 ;  153 (1) : e174591
 
Bayoumi Y., Heikal T., Darweish H. Survival Benefit of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Stage III and IV Bladder Cancer: Results of 170 Patients. Cancer Manage Res 2014 ;  6 : 459-465 [cross-ref]
 
Voskuilen C.S., Seiler R., Rink M., Poyet C., Noon A.P., Roghmann F., et al. Urothelial Carcinoma in Bladder Diverticula: A Multicenter Analysis of Characteristics and Clinical Outcomes. Eur Urol Focus 2018 ; S2405-4569(18)30382-1.
 
Siefker-Radtke A. Urachal adenocarcinoma: a clinician's guide for treatment. Semin Oncol 2012 ;  39 (5) : 619-624 [cross-ref]
 
Mistretta F.A., Cyr S.J., Luzzago S., Mazzone E., Knipper S., Palumbo C., et al. Partial Cystectomy With Pelvic Lymph Node Dissection for Patients With Nonmetastatic Stage pT2-T3 Urothelial Carcinoma of Urinary Bladder: Temporal Trends and Survival Outcomes. Clin Genitourin Cancer 2020 ;  18 (2) : 129-137.e3
 
Golombos D.M., O'Malley P., Lewicki P., Stone B.V., Scherr DS. Robot-assisted partial cystectomy: perioperative outcomes and early oncological efficacy. BJU Int 2017 ;  119 (1) : 128-134 [cross-ref]
 
Owyong M., Koru-Sengul T., Miao F., Razdan S., Moore K.J., Alameddine M., et al. Impact of Surgical Technique on Surgical Margin Status Following Partial Cystectomy. Urol Oncol 2019 ;  37 (12) : 870-876 [cross-ref]
 
Lacarrière E., Smaali C., Benyoucef A., Pfister C., Grise P. The efficacy of hemostatic radiotherapy for bladder cancer-related hematuria in patients unfit for surgery. Int Braz J Urol 2013 ;  39 (6) : 808-816
 
Abt D., Bywater M., Engeler D.S., Schmid HP. Therapeutic options for intractable hematuria in advanced bladder cancer. Int J Urol 2013 ;  20 (7) : 651-660 [cross-ref]
 
De Berardinis E., Vicini P., Salvatori F., Sciarra A., Gentile V., Di Silverio F. Superselective embolization of bladder arteries in the treatment of intractable bladder haemorrhage. Int J Urol 2005 ;  12 (5) : 503-505 [cross-ref]
 
Ghahestani S.M., Shakhssalim N. Palliative treatment of intractable hematuria in context of advanced bladder cancer: a systemic review. Urol J 2009 ;  6 (3) : 149-156
 
Grossman H.B., Natale R.B., Tangen C.M., Speights V.O., Vogelzang N.J., Trump D.L., et al. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus cystectomy compared with cystectomy alone for locally advanced bladder cancer. N Engl J Med 2003 ;  349 (9) : 859-866 [cross-ref]
 
Al-Alao O., Mueller-Leonhard C., Kim S.P., Amin A., Tucci C., Kott O., et al. Clinically Node-Positive (cN+) Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder Treated With Chemotherapy and Radical Cystectomy: Clinical Outcomes and Development of a Postoperative Risk Stratification Model. Urol Oncol 2020 ;  38 (3) : 76.e19-76.e28
 
Bae W.K., Lee H.L., Park S.H., Kim J.H., Kim H.J., Maeng C.H., et al. Comparative Effectiveness of Palliative Chemotherapy Versus Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Cystectomy Versus Cystectomy Followed by Adjuvant Chemotherapy Versus Cystectomy for Regional Node-Positive Bladder Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis: KCSG GU 17-03. Cancer Med 2019 ;  8 (12) : 5431-5437 [cross-ref]
 
von der Maase H., Sengeløv L., Roberts J.T., Ricci S., Dogliotti L., Oliver T., et al. Long-term survival results of a randomized trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin, with methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, plus cisplatin in patients with bladder cancer. J Clin Oncol 2005 ;  23 (21) : 4602-4608 [cross-ref]
 
Bajorin D.F., Dodd P.M., Mazumdar M., Fazzari M., McCaffrey J.A., Scher H.I., et al. Long-term survival in metastatic transitional-cell carcinoma and prognostic factors predicting outcome of therapy. J Clin Oncol 1999 ;  17 (10) : 3173-3181 [cross-ref]
 
Sonpavde G., Galsky M.D., Bellmunt J. A new approach to second-line therapy for urothelial cancer? Lancet Oncol 2013 ;  14 (8) : 682-684 [inter-ref]
 
Sternberg C.N., de Mulder P., Schornagel J.H., Theodore C., Fosså S.D., van Oosterom A.T., et al. Seven year update of an EORTC phase III trial of high-dose intensity M-VAC chemotherapy and G-CSF versus classic M-VAC in advanced urothelial tract tumours. Eur J Cancer 2006 ;  42 (1) : 50-54 [cross-ref]
 
von der Maase H. Gemcitabine in transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2003 ;  3 : 11-19 [cross-ref]
 
Bellmunt J., de Wit R., Vaughn D.J., Fradet Y., Lee J.L., Fong L., et al. Pembrolizumab as second-line therapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma. N Engl J Med 2017 ;  376 (11) : 1015-1026 [cross-ref]
 
Bellmunt J., Fougeray R., Rosenberg J.E., von der Maase H., Schutz F.A., Salhi Y., et al. Long-term survival results of a randomized phase III trial of vinflunine plus best supportive care versus best supportive care alone in advanced urothelial carcinoma patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. Ann Oncol 2013 ;  24 (6) : 1466-1472 [cross-ref]
 
Edeline J., Loriot Y., Culine S., Massard C., Albigès L., Blesius A., et al. Accelerated MVAC chemotherapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer previously treated with a platinum-gemcitabine regimen. Eur J Cancer 2012 ;  48 (8) : 1141-1146 [cross-ref]
 
Colin P., Neuzillet Y., Pignot G., Rouprêt M., Comperat E., Larré S., et al. Surveillance des carcinomes urothéliaux: revue du Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie. Prog Urol 2015 ;  25 (10) : 616-624 [inter-ref]
 
Carando R., Shariat S.F., Moschini M., D'Andrea D. Ureteral and urethral recurrence after radical cystectomy: a systematic review. Curr Opin Urol 2020 ;  30 (3) : 441-448 [cross-ref]
 
Rouvière O., Cornelis F., Brunelle S., Roy C., André M., Bellin M.F., et al. Imaging protocols for renal multiparametric MRI and MR urography: results of a consensus conference from the French Society of Genitourinary Imaging. Eur Radiol 2020 ;  30 (4) : 2103-2114
 
Eisenberg M.S., Thompson R.H., Frank I., Kim S.P., Cotter K.J., Tollefson M.K., et al. Long-term Renal Function Outcomes After Radical Cystectomy. J Urol 2014 ;  191 (3) : 619-625 [cross-ref]
 
Boorjian S.A., Kim S.P., Weight C.J., Cheville J.C., Thapa P., Frank I. Risk factors and outcomes of urethral recurrence following radical cystectomy. Eur Urol 2011 ;  60 (6) : 1266-1272 [cross-ref]
 
Powles T., Park S.H., Voog E., Caserta C., Valderrama B.P., Gurney H., Kalofonos H., Radulović S., Demey W., Ullén A., Loriot Y., Sridhar S.S., Tsuchiya N., Kopyltsov E., Sternberg C.N., Bellmunt J., Aragon-Ching J.B., Petrylak D.P., Laliberte R., Wang J., Huang B., Davis C., Fowst C., Costa N., Blake-Haskins J.A., di Pietro A., Grivas P. Avelumab Maintenance Therapy for Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma. N Engl J Med. 2020 ;  383 (13) : 1218-1230 [cross-ref]
 
 
 

Further reading

 

 

 
Wu Y.P., Lin T.T., Chen S.H., Xu N., Wei Y., Huang J.B., et al. Comparison of the efficacy and feasibility of en bloc transurethral resection of bladder tumor versus conventional transurethral resection of bladder tumor: A meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore) 2016 ;  95 (45) : e5372
 
 
Kramer M.W., Altieri V., Hurle R., Lusuardi L., Merseburger A.S., Rassweiler J., et al. Current Evidence of Transurethral En-bloc Resection of Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer. Eur Urol Focus 2017 ;  3 : 567-576 [cross-ref]
 
 
Yang H, Lin J, Gao P, He Z, Kuang X, Li X, et al. Is the En Bloc Transurethral Resection More Effective than Conventional Transurethral Resection for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jan 7]. Urol Int 2020;1-8. doi:10.1159/000503734.
 
 
Chou R., Selph S., Buckley D.I., Fu R., Griffin J.C., Grusing S., et al. Comparative Effectiveness of Fluorescent Versus White Light Cystoscopy for Initial Diagnosis or Surveillance of Bladder Cancer on Clinical Outcomes: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J Urol 2017 ;  197 : 548-558 [cross-ref]
 
 
Gakis G., Fahmy O. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Impact of Hexaminolevulinate- Versus White-Light Guided Transurethral Bladder Tumor Resection on Progression in Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer. Bladder Cancer 2016 ;  2 : 293-300 [cross-ref]
 
 
Tran K, Severn M. Blue Light Cystoscopy in Patients with Suspected Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Carcinoma: A Review of Clinical Utility. Ottawa (ON): Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health; 2017.
 
 
Burger M., Grossman H.B., Droller M., Schmidbauer J., Hermann G., Drãgoescu O., et al. Photodynamic diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer with hexaminolevulinate cystoscopy: a meta-analysis of detection and recurrence based on raw data. Eur Urol 2013 ;  64 : 846-854 [cross-ref]