Cathétérisme intermittent : recommandations de bonnes pratiques de l’Association française d’urologie (AFU), du Groupe de neuro-urologie de langue française (GENULF), de la Société française de médecine physique et de réadaptation (SOFMER...

25 avril 2020

Auteurs : X. Gamé, V. Phé, E. Castel-Lacanal, V. Forin, M. de Sèze, O. Lam, E. Chartier-Kastler, V. Keppenne, J. Corcos, P. Denys, R. Caremel, C.-M. Loche, M.-C. Scheiber-Nogueira, G. Karsenty, A. Even
Référence : Prog Urol, 2020, 5, 30, 232-251




 




English version


Introduction


Intermittent catheterisation has been part of the therapeutic arsenal for urinary retention problems for several thousands of years. The practice was revolutionised by Gutmann and Frankel and subsequently by Lapides, and lead to the development of intermittent self-catheterisation [1, 2]. Intermittent catheterisation is used in current clinical practice to manage urinary retention problems of neurological or non-neurological origin. The procedure is recommended by numerous learned societies for the management of neurogenic bladder disorders [3, 4] and is considered as the gold standard for the management of voiding dysfunction.


There is, however, no clear consensus and there are currently no national or international guidelines on indications which necessitate intermittent catheterisation, on training modalities, equipment to be used, implementation modalities, screening and infection management, modalities of third-party catheterisation and intermittent catheterisation in specific populations such as children, the elderly, urinary diversion patients with continent cutaneous reservoirs or benign prostatic hyperplasia patients. This is creating disparities between practices and may restrict patients' therapeutic options.


The objective of this work, which was initiated by the neuro-urology committee of the French association of urology (Association Française d'Urologie [AFU]), in collaboration with the French society of physical medicine and rehabilitation (Société Française de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation [SOFMER]), the French language neuro-urology group (Groupe d'Etude de Neuro-Urologie de Langue Française [GENULF]) and the interdisciplinary francophone society for urodynamic and pelvi-perineology (Société Interdisciplinaire Francophone d'UroDynamique et de Pelvi Périnéologie [SIFUD-PP]), was to develop clinical practical guidelines on all aspects of intermittent catheterisation in order to facilitate users' clinical decision-making with regard to the indications and modalities of intermittent catheterisation.


These guidelines are intended for urologists, physical and rehabilitation physicians, gynaecologists, geriatricians, paediatricians, neurologists, general practitioners and for other healthcare professionals including nurses, carers...


Materials and methods


A systematic review of the literature based on Pubmed, Embase, Google scholar was initiated in December 2014 and updated in April 2019 by members of the steering committee. The following keywords were used to search the databases: "intermittent catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "intermittent self catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent self catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterization"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterisation"[All Fields] AND ((systematic[sb] OR Review[ptyp] OR Meta-Analysis[ptyp]) AND (English[lang] OR French[lang])) AND "humans"[MeSH Terms] et "neurogenic bladder disorders"[Title] OR "neurogenic bowel"[MeSH Terms]) OR "neurogenic bowel"[Title]) OR "neuro urological patients"[Title]) OR "urinary bladder"[MeSH Terms]) OR "urinary bladder"[Title]) OR "bowel dysfunction"[Title]) OR "urinary tract disease"[Title] OR "urinary retention"[Title]) OR "urinary retention"[MeSH Terms]) OR "continent stoma"[Title]) OR "prostatic hyperplasia"[MeSH Terms]) OR "prostatic hyperplasia"[Title]) AND "intermittent catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "intermittent self catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent self catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterization"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterisation"[All Fields] NOT "letter"[Publication Type]) NOT "review"[Publication Type] NOT "comment"[Publication Type] NOT "editorial"[Publication Type] AND (English[lang] OR French[lang]) AND "humans"[MeSH Terms]).


Given the paucity of specific evidence-based studies and considering the controversies which exist in the field, the approach prescribed in such cases by the French High Authority for Health (Haute Autorité de Santé - HAS), which relies on establishing guidelines by formal consensus of panels of experts (Delphi method) [5], was adopted (recommandations-par-consensus-formalise-rcf?portal=r_1482172).


Eleven fields of application were defined (Table 1). Relevant studies were classified according to the quality of evidence by the steering group, in line with the HAS grid. Proposals were developed and submitted to a scoring group (two rounds of scoring). At the end of the first scoring round, feedback was provided to identify areas of convergence and divergence or inconsistencies among the panel of experts. On the basis of the meeting between the two rounds, the areas of divergence were reviewed and, if necessary, proposals where no consensus could be reached reformulated. At the end of the second round of scoring, a first version of the guidelines was drafted and submitted to a review group. The final text was prepared after this review.


Scoring


A panel of French-speaking specialists from different disciplines (urology, physical and rehabilitation medicine, neurology and gynaecology), including paediatrics, with extensive experience in intermittent catheterisation, was selected to vote on the proposals submitted by the steering group. These proposals were based on an analysis of the literature, covering the different aspects of intermittent catheterisation and compiled by the steering group.


Proposals were submitted in two rounds to specialists using the Survey Monkey® software (San Mateo, California, USA). Each specialist rated individual proposals with a score between 1 (totally inappropriate proposal) and 9 (totally appropriate proposal). In the first round, 136 proposals were put to the vote, and 69 in the second round.


Only proposals that had strong agreement from the outset after the first round (median≥7 and all scores between [7, 8, 9] or median ≤3 and all scores between [1, 2, 3]) were not resubmitted for a second round of the scoring process.


During a meeting with the members of the scoring group, some proposals were modified or amended to provide clarity or grouped with other proposals at the end of the first scoring round. At the end of the 2nd scoring round, guidelines based on the level of consensus were issued, in accordance with standards advocated by the HAS.


The first draft of the guidelines was submitted to the review group, for a formal opinion on merit and structure, including the feasibility, admissibility and readability of the guidelines.


Members of the steering committee, the scoring and review groups are listed in Table 2.


Results


Literature search


The literature search identified 1317 articles. General reviews, studies that did not resolve issues that were raised and clinical cases were excluded from the outset. Studies were ranked by quality of the evidence they provided and only level 1 and 2 studies, meta-analyses and systematic reviews were included, for a total of 97 articles.


Scoring


Fourteen physicians (5 physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, 3 urologists, 2 gynaecologists and 4 uro-paediatricians) responded to the first-round questionnaire, 12 responded to the second-round questionnaire (6 urologists, 4 physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, 1 gynaecologist and 1 uro-paediatrician).


One hundred and thirty-six proposals were submitted to a vote by the panel of experts during the 1st round. Of these, 30 received strong support from the outset (22%) and 25 moderate support (18.38%).


Sixty-nine proposals were submitted to the 2nd round of voting by the panel. Thirty of these received strong support from the outset (43.47%) and 18 were moderately supported (26.08%).


A total of 60 proposals received strong support at the end of the two rounds and 18 proposals were moderately supported.


Review


Of the 32 physicians contacted to be reviewers, 25 responded positively (13 physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, 8 urologists, 3 gynaecologists and 1 uro-paediatrician). Of the 78 proposals submitted, 71 were deemed relevant. The 7 proposals where a consensus could not be reached were discussed and retained. These concerned guidelines 8, 9, 16, 17, 45, 73 and 78.


Guidelines



Indications for intermittent catheterisation


Four different conditions were defined.



Short-term bladder drainage


There was insufficient and very heterogeneous published data which focussed on evaluating the optimum method for short-term drainage of urine from the bladder. Indeed, the evidence from studies that compared intermittent catheterisation and indwelling catheterisation with intermittent catheterisation and suprapubic catheterisation in terms of symptomatic urinary tract infections, bacteriuria and pain was either incomplete or the results too heterogeneous [6]. We examined the findings from the Kidd meta-analysis which compared intermittent catheterisation and indwelling catheterisation based on 14 independent studies. Only two randomised trials [7, 8] investigated symptomatic urinary tract infections. But these were very heterogeneous and the findings could not be pooled. The Hakvoort study enrolled 87 patients with a Post-Void Residual (PVR) volume greater than 150ml on the first day after urogenital surgery. In the indwelling catheter group, 13/42 patients developed symptomatic urinary tract infections, compared to 5/45 patients in the intermittent catheterisation group. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups [7]. The Tang study included patients over 65 years of age, hospitalised in a geriatric rehabilitation centre with a PVR of greater than 300ml. No symptomatic urinary tract infections were reported in the indwelling catheter group (n =45) and only one in the intermittent catheterisation group (n =36) [8]. Only three other studies compared intermittent catheterisation and suprapubic catheterisation, exclusively in women [9, 10, 11], with only one of these evaluating symptomatic Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) after uro-gyneacologic surgery. In this latter study, 10/36 suprapubic catheter patients developed a symptomatic UTI compared to 6/36 in the intermittent catheterisation group, but there was no significant difference between groups [9].


French guidelines for the prevention of healthcare-related urinary tract infections were established in 2015. They recommend the use of systematic bladder drainage except after pelvic and urethra-bladder-prostate surgery, general anaesthesia longer than 3hours and surgery, to monitor diuresis, associated with a high-risk of haemorrhage, and unless otherwise advised by the surgeon and/or the anaesthetist in charge. We strongly advise against placement of permanent bladder catheter drainage in spinal cord injury patients or in patients with other bladder emptying disorders that may benefit from intermittent catheterisation. (prevention-infections-urinaires-associees-aux-soins.pdf).



Long-term bladder drainage


For long-term bladder drainage (>14 days), the data do not provide sufficient supportive evidence and do not allow to draw conclusions with regards to the most appropriate drainage technique as indicated in the summary of the Niel-Weise Cochrane review [12]. This review identified eight studies, involving a total of 504 patients, which included neurogenic bladder patients as well as elderly patients living independently and children. There have been no studies comparing either intermittent catheterisation with suprapubic catheters or intermittent catheterisation with the indwelling catheters.



Bladder emptying in neurological disorder patients


In the case of neurological disorder patients, the data also lack adequate supportive evidence and do not allow us to infer the best bladder management technique [13]. Jamison et al. identified 806 studies, 6 of which may have been eligible for inclusion. However, none of these were randomised. Nevertheless, all current guidelines indicate that intermittent catheterisation is the treatment of choice in cases of subvesical obstruction of neurological origin, particularly in cases of bladder-sphincter dyssynergia or hypocontractile bladders [3, 14, 15, 16].



Urinary retention in benign prostatic hyperplasia


In the case of urinary retention due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) however, it has been shown that intermittent catheterisation for a period of 6 months, prior to BPH surgery, is more effective for recovering post-operative bladder function when compared to BPH surgery alone [17]. This was a randomised study of 41 BPH patients with a PVR greater than 300ml Patients were randomised into two groups: one group underwent TransUrethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP) (n =17) and the other group underwent intermittent catheterisation for a period of 6 months prior to surgical treatment. At 6 months post-surgery, i.e. after both groups of patients had undergone TURP, quality of life and IPSS scores improved in both groups, but the group of patients that had undergone intermittent catheterisation for 6 months prior to TURP had better bladder drainage, as shown from their pressure-flow curves.


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation indications are listed in Table 3.


Intermittent catheterisation training modalities


The French society of physical medicine and rehabilitation (Société Française de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation) published a methodology guide for training healthcare personnel in the use of intermittent catheterisation in 2009. (etp-as-final.pdf). Given the limitations of the available literature at the time, this guide is based on a collective agreement from peer reviews of the working group. The only studies published on the issue since then have been case follow-up studies. No studies based on high-quality evidence have been published on the subject to date.


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation training modalities are listed in Table 4.


Choice of equipment


A Cochrane review published in 2008 recommended classifying catheterisation equipment into two main categories: sterile dry catheters used with a separate lubricant to facilitate catheter insertion and sterile, hydrophilic or non-hydrophilic pre-lubricated catheters (with the lubricant conveniently pre-applied) [18].


In 2014, Prieto et al. published a Cochrane review examining different types of catheters for intermittent catheterisation and the risk of complications [19]. Thirty-one trials were reviewed including 13 random control and 18 cross-over studies. The authors were unable to draw definitive conclusion as to which catheter was more effective due to the large heterogeneity between studies, some were more than 10 years old, as well as inconsistencies in the definitions of urinary tract infections between studies. Nevertheless, a number of recent studies, examining a smaller number of cases, report a reduced risk of complications such as urinary tract infections and urethral trauma with hydrophilic catheters [20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26]. This decreased risk of infection was confirmed in the Rognoni and Tarricone meta-analysis of 7 randomised controlled trials [27]. The authors reported a 16% reduction in risk for patients using hydrophilic catheters compared to patients using dry catheters. There was no difference in the risk of haematuria arising from intermittent self-catheterisation with the different types of catheters.


Prieto et al. in 2014 also investigated catheter length. The study focussed on five randomised controlled trials. No firm conclusions could be drawn due to the large heterogeneity between study results [19].


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation equipment options are listed in Table 5.


Implementation modalities


The majority of reported studies evaluating the implementation modalities of catheterisation have focused on comparing clean and aseptic techniques. Six trials [28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33] have been conducted to date. A 2014 Cochrane review analysing results from these trials found no significant difference with respect to the risk of infectious complications (0.82, 95% CI: 0.06-11.33). This applied to both intermittent self-catheterisation and third-party intermittent catheterisation [19].


There is, however, no robust data on the minimum diuresis required or the maximum intravesical urine volume for performing intermittent catheterisations. Only one single study looked at the impact of urine volume on catheterisation and showed that the risk of bacteriuria increases with volumes greater than 400ml [34].


All current guidelines for managing the lower urinary tract of neurological disorder patients using intermittent catheterisation stress the importance of maintaining low pressure in the lower urinary tract, privileging clean technique, ensuring that a minimum of four catheterisations are performed per day and that the volume per catheterisation does not exceed 400 to 500mL[3, 14, 15, 16].


Guidelines for the modalities of performing intermittent catheterisations are listed in Table 6.


Urine culture tests and intermittent catheterisation


Bacteriuria issues are almost inextricably linked to the implementation of intermittent catheterisation. Guidelines issued by the French language infectious pathology society (Société de Pathologie Infectieuse de Langue Française) stipulate that urine culture tests should not be carried out systematically or directly after a course of antibiotics [35]. Guidelines of the French association of urology (Association Française d'Urologie), the French language infectious pathology society (Société de Pathologie Infectieuse de Langue Française) and the French society of hospital hygiene (Société Française d'Hygiène Hospitalière) for the prevention of urinary tract infections in healthcare stipulate that a Urine Culture Test (UCT) should be performed, to detect any bacteriuria before undertaking any interventions where exposure to urine cannot be avoided, to treat any existing bacteriuria as a precautionary measure if the urine cannot be otherwise guaranteed to remain sterile, for example by delaying a procedure or delaying the replacement of an intra-urinary device, to treat bacteriuria 48hours prior to the procedure involving exposure to urine and extend treatment of the bacteriuria till the urinary catheter is removed or for a maximum of 7 days thereafter if the catheter cannot be removed (2015-RPC-infections_urinaires_associees_aux_soins.pdf). Guidelines of the French association of urology (Association Française d'Urologie) and the interdisciplinary francophone society for urodynamic and pelvi-perineology (Société Interdisciplinaire Francophone d'UroDynamique et de Pelvi Périnéologie) on antibiotic prophylaxis prior to urodynamic testing are, to carry out a urine culture test with antibiotic susceptibility testing a few days prior to urodynamic testing [36].


Guidelines on indications for performing and managing Urine Culture Tests (UCTs) in intermittent catheterisation patients are presented in Table 7.


Paediatric populations


As far as the paediatric population is concerned, 271 articles were reviewed, all evaluated a limited number of patients and only 5 were supported by high quality evidence. These 5 studies predominantly focused on the risk of infection and in particular on the benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis. The Cochrane review by Niël-Weise et al. reported that it was not possible to draw any conclusions on this issue based on the currently available data [12]. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic for prophylactic treatment in all studies based on sound evidence was nitrofurantoin, an antibiotic currently contraindicated for the treatment of chronic conditions [37, 38, 39].


The Prieto et al. Cochrane review assessing the equipment and modalities of intermittent catheterisation also considered paediatric populations. It states that it is not possible to draw any conclusions regarding the paediatric population specifically due, to the low number of patients studied [19]. Only one study found a reduced risk of macroscopic haematuria at 8 weeks when using pre-lubricated hydrophilic catheters as opposed to dry catheters [40].


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation in the paediatric population are presented in Table 8.


Geriatric populations


There are no robust data available for the geriatric population. No randomised controlled trial or even a fortiori meta-analyses have been published on this population to date. Most studies in geriatric populations focused on patient training and compliance. They evaluated a limited number of patients and their results are not always compatible, notably due to their very different follow-up periods [41, 42, 43, 44].


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation in the geriatric population are presented in Table 9.


Intermittent catheterisation and continent urinary diversions with a cutaneous reservoir


There is currently no robust data on the modalities of intermittent catheterisation following continent cutaneous reservoir surgery. The Cochrane review by Jamison et al. on long-term bladder drainage modalities for neurogenic bladders does not mention anything about this issue [13].


The Mitrofanoff procedure is the most widely used and reliable procedure as determined in the systematic literature review of the European urological association's neuro-urology advisory group [45]. If there is no appendix or if length is compromised, a Monti or Casale tube is constructed. But no study has to date directly compared these two surgical procedures [46].


There are also no studies that have directly compared the different stoma sites even though a simulation of catheterisation of virtual stomas could assist in the final stoma site selection [47].


No studies have investigated the impact of catheter length on bladder emptying or the modalities of preoperative assessment.


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation of a continent urinary diversion with a cutaneous reservoir are presented in Table 10.


Third-party intermittent catheterisation


To date, there have been no studies supported by robust level of evidence on third-party intermittent catheterisation. The rare studies dealing with the issue have been conducted in children [19]. In a descriptive study, Moore concluded that there was no difference in terms of complications when the children themselves or their parents performed the intermittent catheterisation [31].


Guidelines for third-party intermittent catheterisation are listed in Table 11.


Intermittent catheterisation and benign prostatic hyperplasia


Robust data on intermittent catheterisation in benign prostatic hyperplasia is limited. There have been rare randomised studies predominantly comparing transurethral prostate resection and intermittent self-catheterisation. Ghalayini et al. showed that intermittent self-catheterisation relieved patients of their lower urinary tract symptoms and improved their quality of life to a similar extent than patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and that patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate after a period of intermittent self-catheterisation had better functional outcomes than patients who had the resection alone [17].


Other studies have investigated the rate of micturition recovery in men after an acute episode of urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, by comparing an indwelling urinary catheter in conjunction with alpha-blockers, with intermittent self-catheterisation and alpha-blockers. Patel et al. found that the rate of micturition recovery was greater in the intermittent self-catheterisation group than in the indwelling urinary catheter group [46].


Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation in benign prostatic hyperplasia are presented in Table 12.


Management of intermittent catheterisation complications


There are no guidelines or robust data available on the management of intermittent catheterisation complications beyond urinary tract infections.


Guidelines for the management of complications of intermittent catheterisation are presented in Table 13.


Conclusion


These first guidelines on intermittent catheterisation are intended for physicians, healthcare workers and carers alike. They are intended to harmonise current practices.


The lack of robust data on the issue is, however, regrettable as it precludes the formulation of guidelines based on high quality evidence.


Acknowledgements


The authors would like to thank all physicians involved in formulating these guidelines and Diana Kassab for her methodological support and for proofreading the French manuscript.


French version


Introduction


Le sondage intermittent fait partie de l'arsenal thérapeutique en cas de rétention urinaire depuis plusieurs milliers d'années. Sa pratique a été révolutionnée par les travaux de Gutmann et Frankel, puis de Lapides aboutissant à l'avènement de l'autosondage intermittent propre [1, 2]. Le sondage intermittent est actuellement employé dans la pratique pour la prise en charge de la rétention urinaire d'origine neurologique ou non neurologique. Il est recommandé par de nombreuses sociétés savantes dans le cadre de la prise en charge des vessies neurologiques [3, 4] et est considéré comme le gold standard du traitement des troubles mictionnels non traitables par la prise de médicaments.


Toutefois, il n'existe pas de réel consensus ou de recommandations nationales ou internationales sur les indications du sondage intermittent, les modalités d'apprentissage, le matériel utilisé, les modalités de réalisation, le dépistage et la prise en charge des infections, les modalités de réalisation des hétérosondages et les sondages intermittents dans des populations particulières telles que : l'enfant, la personne âgée, les patients porteurs de dérivation urinaire cutanée continente ou d'hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate. Ceci génère des disparités dans la pratique et un risque de perte de chance pour les patients.


L'objectif de ce travail, à l'initiative du comité de neuro-urologie de l'Association française d'urologie (AFU), en collaboration avec la Société française de médecine physique et de réadaptation (SOFMER), le Groupe d'étude de neuro-urologie de langue française (GENULF) et la Société interdisciplinaire francophone d'urodynamique et de pelvipérinéologie (SIFUD-PP), était d'élaborer des recommandations de bonne pratique sur le cathétérisme intermittent dans toutes ses composantes afin d'aider les utilisateurs dans leur décision clinique relative aux indications et aux modalités du cathétérisme intermittent.


Ces recommandations s'adressent aux cliniciens urologues, médecins de médecine physique et de réadaptation, gynécologues, gériatres, pédiatres, neurologues, médecins généralistes ainsi qu'autres professionnels de santé, notamment les infirmières, les aidants...


Matériels et méthodes


Une revue systématique de la littérature à partir de Pubmed, Embase, Google scholar a été menée en décembre 2014 puis actualisée en avril 2019 par les membres du comité de pilotage. Les mots-clés utilisés dans la recherche étaient : "intermittent catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "intermittent self catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent self catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterization"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterisation"[All Fields] AND ((systematic[sb] OR Review[ptyp] OR Meta-Analysis[ptyp]) AND (English[lang] OR French[lang])) AND "humans"[MeSH Terms] et "neurogenic bladder disorders"[Title] OR "neurogenic bowel"[MeSH Terms]) OR "neurogenic bowel"[Title]) OR "neuro urological patients"[Title]) OR "urinary bladder"[MeSH Terms]) OR "urinary bladder"[Title]) OR "bowel dysfunction"[Title]) OR "urinary tract disease"[Title] OR "urinary retention"[Title]) OR "urinary retention"[MeSH Terms]) OR "continent stoma"[Title]) OR "prostatic hyperplasia"[MeSH Terms]) OR "prostatic hyperplasia"[Title]) AND "intermittent catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "intermittent self catheterization"[All Fields] OR "Intermittent self catheterisation"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterization"[All Fields] OR "indwelling catheterisation"[All Fields] NOT "letter"[Publication Type]) NOT "review"[Publication Type] NOT "comment"[Publication Type] NOT "editorial"[Publication Type] AND (English[lang] OR French[lang]) AND "humans"[MeSH Terms]).


Compte tenu de l'absence d'études de niveau de preuve suffisant et compte tenu des controverses concernant cette thématique, il a été décidé d'utiliser la méthode de recommandations par consensus formalisé d'experts (méthode DELPHI [5]) décrite par la Haute Autorité de santé (HAS) (recommandations-par-consensus-formalise-rcf?portal=r_1482172).


Onze champs d'application ont été définis (Tableau 1). Les études correspondantes ont été classées en fonction de leur niveau de preuve par le groupe de pilotage selon la grille de la HAS. Des propositions ont été élaborées et soumises à un groupe de cotation (deux tours de cotation). À l'issu du premier tour de cotation, un retour d'information a permis d'identifier les points de convergence et les points de divergence ou d'indécision entre experts. La réunion entre les deux tours a permis de revoir les points de divergence et, le cas échéant, de reformuler les propositions non consensuelles. À l'issu du deuxième tour de cotation, une première version de recommandations a été rédigée puis soumise à un groupe de lecture. Après retour de ce dernier, le texte final a été rédigé.


Cotations


Un panel d'experts francophones issus de différentes spécialités (Urologie, Médecine physique et de réadaptation, Neurologie et Gynécologie) adultes et pédiatriques, ayant une grande pratique du sondage intermittent, a été sélectionné afin de voter sur les propositions soumises par le groupe de pilotage. Ces propositions ont été élaborées par le groupe de pilotage, à partir de l'analyse de la littérature, dans les différents domaines du cathétérisme intermittent.


Elles ont été soumises aux experts via le logiciel Survey Monkey® (San Mateo, Californie, États-Unis), en deux tours. Chaque proposition devait être cotée par l'expert entre 1 (proposition totalement inappropriée) et 9 (proposition totalement appropriée). Au premier tour, 136 propositions ont été soumises au vote ; 69 au deuxième tour.


Seules les propositions ayant obtenu un accord fort d'emblée à l'issue du premier tour (médiane ≥ 7 et toutes les cotations réparties entre [7, 8, 9] ou médiane ≤ 3 et toutes les cotations réparties entre [1, 2, 3]) n'ont pas été soumises à nouveau lors du deuxième tour de cotation.


Lors d'une réunion avec les membres du groupe de cotation, certaines propositions ont été modifiées ou amendées afin de les clarifier ou les regrouper avec d'autres propositions à l'issue du premier tour de cotation. À l'issue du 2nd tour de cotation, les recommandations ont été formulées sur la base du degré de consensus obtenu, selon les règles préconisées par la HAS.


La version initiale des recommandations a été adressée au groupe de lecture, qui devait donner un avis formalisé sur le fond et la forme, notamment sur l'applicabilité, acceptabilité et la lisibilité de celles-ci.


La liste des membres du comité de pilotage et des groupes de cotation et relecture est présentée Tableau 2.


Résultats


Recherche bibliographique


La recherche bibliographique a trouvé 1317 articles. Les revues générales, les études ne répondant pas à la question et les cas cliniques ont été exclus d'emblée. Les études ont été classées selon le niveau de preuve et seules les études de niveau 1 et 2 ainsi que les méta-analyses et les revues systématiques ont été analysées soit 97 articles.


Cotation


Quatorze médecins (5 médecins de médecine physique et réadaptation, 3 urologues, 2 gynécologues et 4 uropédiatres) ont répondu au questionnaire au premier tour, 12 au deuxième tour (6 urologues, 4 médecins de médecine physique et réadaptation, 1 gynécologue et 1 uropédiatre).


Cent trente-six propositions ont été soumises au vote des experts lors du 1er tour. Parmi celles-ci 30 ont obtenu un accord fort d'emblée (22 %) et 25 un accord relatif (18,38 %).


Soixante-neuf propositions ont été soumises au 2e tour de vote des experts. Parmi celles-ci, 30 ont obtenu un accord fort (43,47 %) et 18 un accord relatif (26,08 %).


Au total, 60 propositions ont obtenu à l'issue des deux tours un accord fort et 18 un accord relatif.


Relecture


Sur 32 médecins contactés, 25 ont répondu (13 médecins de médecine physique et réadaptation, 8 urologues, 3 gynécologues et 1 uropédiatre). Sur les 78 propositions, 71 ont été considérées comme appropriées. Concernant les 7 propositions n'ayant pas fait l'objet d'un consensus, elles ont été discutées. La décision a été de les maintenir. Il s'agissait des recommandations 8, 9, 16, 17, 45, 73 et 78.


Recommandations



Indications du cathétérisme intermittent


Quatre situations ont été définies.



Drainage vésical pour une courte durée


Les données publiées étaient insuffisantes et très hétérogènes pour déterminer quelle était la meilleure méthode de drainage vésical pour une courte durée. En effet, le niveau de preuve des études qui ont comparé le cathétérisme intermittent et la sonde à demeure et le cathétérisme intermittent et le cathéter sus-pubien en termes d'infection urinaire symptomatique, bactériurie et douleur n'était soit pas suffisant, soit les résultats étaient très hétérogènes [6]. Dans la méta-analyse de Kidd, les résultats concernant la comparaison du cathétérisme intermittent et de la sonde à demeure à partir de 14 études identifiées ont été étudiés. Seules deux études randomisées [7, 8] traitaient des infections urinaires symptomatiques. Cependant ces études étaient très hétérogènes et les résultats ne pouvaient pas être poolés. Dans celle de Hakvoort étaient inclus 87 patients ayant un résidu postmictionnel (RPM) supérieur à 150ml le premier jour postopératoire d'une chirurgie urogénitale. Dans le groupe sonde à demeure, 13/42 développèrent une infection urinaire symptomatique, et 5/45 dans le groupe cathétérisme intermittent. La différence n'était pas significative [7]. Celle de Tang portait sur des patientes de plus de 65 ans hospitalisées en centre de rééducation gériatrique avec un RPM supérieur à 300ml Aucune infection urinaire symptomatique ne fut rapportée dans le groupe sonde à demeure (n =45) et une seule dans le groupe cathétérisme intermittent (n =36) [8]. Par ailleurs, seules trois études comparaient cathétérisme intermittent et cathéter sus-pubien, uniquement chez des femmes [9, 10, 11], dont une seule portait sur les infections urinaires symptomatiques et ce dans les suites d'une chirurgie à visée urogynécologique. Dans cette dernière, 10/36 patientes avec cathéter sus-pubien développaient une IUS contre 6/36 dans le groupe cathétérisme intermittent, sans différence significative [9].


Des recommandations françaises ont été établies en 2015 pour la prévention des infections urinaires liées aux soins. Ainsi, il est recommandé de ne pas mettre en place un drainage vésical systématique sauf en cas de chirurgie pelvienne et urétro-vésico-prostatique, ou d'anesthésie générale supérieure à 3 H ou de chirurgie à risque hémorragique pour une surveillance de la diurèse, et ce, sauf avis contraire motivé du chirurgien et/ou de l'anesthésiste responsable. Il est fortement recommandé de ne pas mettre en place un drainage vésical permanent chez un patient avec une atteinte de la moelle épinière ou un autre trouble de la vidange vésicale pouvant bénéficier d'un sondage intermittent (prevention-infections-urinaires-associees-aux-soins.pdf).



Drainage vésical au long cours


En cas de nécessité de drainage vésical au long cours (> 14jours), les données n'ont pas un niveau de preuve suffisant et ne permettent pas de conclure quant à la meilleure technique de drainage tel que rapporté dans les conclusions de la revue de la Cochrane de Niel-Weise [12]. Dans cette revue, huit études, incluant soit des patients avec une vessie neurologique, soit des personnes âgées au domicile, soit des enfants avec un total de 504 patients furent retenues. Aucune étude n'a permis de comparer ni le cathétérisme intermittent avec le cathéter sus-pubien ni le cathétérisme intermittent avec la sonde à demeure.



Vidange vésicale chez le patient neurologique


De même, chez le patient neurologique, les données n'ont pas un niveau de preuve suffisant non plus et ne permettent pas de conclure quant à la meilleure technique de gestion urinaire [13]. Jamison et al. ont identifié 806 études, parmi lesquelles 6 pouvaient être éligibles. Cependant aucune n'était randomisée. Toutefois, l'ensemble des recommandations en vigueur indique que le cathétérisme intermittent est le traitement de choix en cas d'obstruction sous-vésicale d'origine neurologique, notamment en cas de dyssynergie vésico-sphinctérienne ou de vessie hypocontractile [3, 14, 15, 16].



Rétention urinaire liée à une hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate


En revanche, en cas de rétention urinaire secondaire à une hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate (HBP), il a été montré que le cathétérisme intermittent pendant 6 mois permettait de récupérer une fonction vésicale de meilleure qualité que la chirurgie [17]. Il s'agissait d'une étude randomisée incluant 41 patients ayant une HBP et avec un RPM supérieur à 300ml. Selon la randomisation, 2 groupes étaient constitués : un avec résection transurétrale de prostate (RTUP) (n =17) et un autre qui réalisait le cathétérisme intermittent pendant 6 mois avant la prise en charge chirurgicale. À 6 mois, donc après que tous les patients aient eu une RTUP, dans les 2 groupes, la qualité de vie et le score IPSS étaient améliorés, mais le groupe de patients ayant réalisé 6 mois le cathétérisme intermittent avant la RTUP, avaient une meilleure vidange vésicale étudiée par la courbe Pression-Débit.


Les recommandations concernant les indications du cathétérisme intermittent sont présentées dans le Tableau 3.


Modalités d'apprentissage du cathétérisme intermittent


En 2009, la Société française de médecine physique et de réadaptation a publié un guide méthodologique pour l'enseignement du cathétérisme intermittent destiné au personnel de soins (etp-as-final.pdf). Ce guide, du fait des limites de la littérature disponible à l'époque, repose sur un accord professionnel au sein du groupe de travail, après avis du groupe de lecture. Depuis, les seules études publiées sur le sujet portaient sur des suivis de cas. Aucune étude de haut niveau de preuve n'a été publiée sur le sujet.


Les recommandations concernant les modalités d'apprentissage du cathétérisme intermittent sont présentées dans le Tableau 4.


Choix du matériel


Une revue Cochrane publiée en 2008 a proposé de classer le matériel de sondage en deux grands groupes : les sondes sèches stériles utilisées avec un lubrifiant séparé pour faciliter l'insertion de la sonde et les sondes prélubrifiées stériles, hydrophiles ou non hydrophiles (adjonction simple d'un lubrifiant) [18].


En 2014, Prieto et al. ont publié une revue Cochrane s'étant intéressée au type de sonde pour la réalisation du cathétérisme intermittent et les risques de complications [19]. Trente et un essais ont été analysés incluant 13 études contrôlées randomisées et 18 études en cross-over. Du fait d'une grande hétérogénéité des études dont certaines dataient de plus de 10 ans, d'une définition variable des infections urinaires, les auteurs n'ont pas pu conclure en faveur d'un type de sonde. Toutefois, un certain nombre d'études récentes, portant sur un petit nombre de cas, rapportent une diminution du risque de complications à type d'infection urinaire ou de traumatisme de l'urèthre en utilisant des sondes hydrophiles [20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26]. La diminution du risque infectieux a été confirmée par la méta-analyse publiée par Rognoni et Tarricone menée à partir de 7 études contrôlées randomisées [27]. Les auteurs indiquaient une diminution du risque de 16 % chez les patients utilisant des sondes hydrophiles par rapport aux patients utilisant des sondes sèches. Concernant le risque de survenue d'une hématurie sous autosondage, aucune différence n'a été trouvée en fonction du type de sonde.


Prieto et al., en 2014, se sont également intéressés à la longueur de la sonde. Cinq essais contrôlés randomisés ont été inclus dans l'étude. Malheureusement, du fait d'une grande hétérogénéité des résultats, aucune conclusion solide n'a pu être établie [19].


Les recommandations concernant le choix du matériel sont présentées dans le Tableau 5.


Modalités de réalisation


La majorité des études rapportées évaluant les modalités de réalisation du cathétérisme a porté sur la comparaison de la technique propre à celle de la technique stérile. Six essais [28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33] ont été réalisés. Leur analyse dans le cadre de la revue Cochrane de 2014 montrait l'absence de différence en terme de risque de complications infectieuses (0,82, IC95 % : 0,06-11,33). De plus, cela était valable qu'il s'agisse d'auto- ou d'hétérosondage [19].


En revanche, il n'existe aucune donnée robuste sur la diurèse minimale nécessaire ou sur le volume intravésical maximal lors de la réalisation du cathétérisme intermittent. Une seule étude s'est intéressée à l'impact du volume lors du sondage et a montré que le risque de bactériurie augmentait en cas de volume supérieur à 400ml [34].


L'ensemble des recommandations actuelles sur la gestion du bas appareil urinaire du patient neurologique sous cathétérisme intermittent souligne l'importance de la gestion du bas appareil urinaire qui doit être maintenu à basse pression, qu'il faut privilégier la technique propre, que le nombre quotidien de sondages doit être d'au moins quatre par jour et le volume recueilli par sondage ne doit pas dépasser 400 à 500ml [3, 14, 15, 16].


Les recommandations concernant les modalités de réalisation du cathétérisme intermittent sont présentées dans le Tableau 6.


Examen cytobactériologique des urines et cathétérisme intermittent


La colonisation bactérienne est quasi-inhérente à la réalisation du cathétérisme intermittent. Les recommandations de la Société de pathologie infectieuse de langue française indiquent qu'il ne faut pas réaliser d'examen cytobactériologique des urines systématique ou de contrôle après un traitement antibiotique [35]. Les recommandations de l'Association française d'urologie, de la Société de pathologie infectieuse de langue française et de la Société française d'hygiène hospitalière portant sur la prévention des infections urinaires liées aux soins stipulent qu'il convient de réaliser un ECBU pour dépister toute colonisation bactérienne urinaire avant une intervention au contact de l'urine, de la traiter préventivement s'il n'est pas possible d'obtenir la stérilité des urines autrement, notamment en retardant l'intervention ou en changeant un dispositif endo-urinaire, de traiter les colonisations avant une intervention au contact de l'urine de 48heures avant l'intervention jusqu'à ablation de la sonde vésicale ou 7jours au maximum si le retrait de la sonde n'est pas possible (2015-RPC-infections_urinaires_associees_aux_soins.pdf). Les recommandations de l'Association française d'urologie et de la Société interdisciplinaire francophone d'urodynamique et de pelvipérinéologie sur l'antibioprophylaxie avant examen urodynamique sont de réaliser un examen cytobactériologique des urines avec antibiogramme dans les jours précédant l'examen urodynamique [36].


Les recommandations concernant les indications à la réalisation et la gestion d'un examen cytobactériologique des urines (ECBU) chez un patient sous cathétérisme intermittent sont présentées dans le Tableau 7.


Pédiatrie


Concernant la population pédiatrique, 271 articles ont été évalués mais seuls 5 avaient un niveau de preuve élevé et le nombre de patients inclus était limité. Ils portaient principalement sur le risque infectieux et en particulier sur l'intérêt d'une antibioprophylaxie. Niël-Weise et al. rapportaient dans la revue Cochrane qu'il n'était pas possible de conclure sur ce sujet au vu des données actuellement disponibles [12]. Le principal antibiotique proposé en prophylaxie dans toutes les études de niveau de preuve élevé était la nitrofurantoïne, antibiotique aujourd'hui contre-indiqué pour tout traitement chronique [37, 38, 39].


La revue Cochrane rapportée par Prieto et al. s'est intéressée au matériel et aux modalités de réalisation du cathétérisme intermittent également dans la population pédiatrique. Elle indique qu'il n'est pas possible de conclure du fait, en particulier, de faibles effectifs [19]. Une seule étude a montré une diminution du risque d'hématurie macroscopique à 8 semaines en cas d'utilisation d'une sonde hydrophile prélubrifiée par rapport à une sonde sèche [40].


Les recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent dans la population pédiatrique sont présentées dans le Tableau 8.


Gériatrie


Il n'existe aucune donnée robuste concernant la population gériatrique. À ce jour, aucune étude randomisée contrôlée et a fortiori de méta-analyse n'a été publiée. La majorité des études rapportées à ce jour portaient sur l'apprentissage et l'adhérence. Elles comprenaient des effectifs limités et leurs résultats n'étaient pas toujours concordants avec des durées de suivis très différents [41, 42, 43, 44].


Les recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent dans la population gériatrique sont présentées dans le Tableau 9.


Cathétérisme intermittent et dérivation urinaire cutanée continente


Il n'existe aucune donnée robuste sur les modalités du cathétérisme intermittent dans la chirurgie de dérivation urinaire cutanée continente. La revue de la Cochrane de Jamison et al. sur les modalités de drainage vésical à long terme des vessies neurologiques ne mentionne rien à ce sujet [13].


Dans la revue systématique de la littérature du groupe de recommandations en neuro-urologie de l'association européenne d'urologie [45], la procédure de Mitrofanoff est la procédure la plus utilisée et la plus fiable. En l'absence d'appendice ou en cas de problème de longueur, un tube de Monti ou de Casale est réalisé. Cependant, aucune étude n'a comparé de manière directe les techniques opératoires entre elles [46].


Aucune étude n'a comparé de manière directe les différents sites de stomie et une évaluation des sondages avec stomie factice pourrait aider au choix final de la position [47].


Aucune étude n'a étudié l'impact de la longueur de la sonde sur la vidange vésicale ou les modalités de l'évaluation avant la chirurgie.


Les recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent en cas de dérivation urinaire cutanée continente sont présentées dans le Tableau 10.


Hétérosondage


Aucune étude de niveau de preuve élevé portant sur l'hétérosondage n'a été rapportée à ce jour. Les rares études traitant du sujet de l'hétérosondage ont été réalisées chez l'enfant [19]. Ainsi Moore, dans une étude descriptive concluait qu'il n'y avait pas de différence en termes de complications lorsque le sondage était fait par l'enfant lui-même ou par ses parents [31].


Les recommandations concernant l'hétérosondage sont présentées dans le Tableau 11.


Cathétérisme Intermittent et hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate


Les données robustes sur le cathétérisme intermittent en cas d'hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate sont limitées. De rares études randomisées ont été rapportées comparant principalement la résection transuréthrale de la prostate et l'autosondage. Ghalayini et al. ont ainsi montré que l'autosondage permettait de soulager les patients de leurs symptômes du bas appareil urinaire et d'améliorer leur qualité de vie de manière comparable à ceux ayant eu une résection transuréthrale de prostate et que les patients ayant eu une résection transuréthrale de la prostate après une période d'autosondage avaient de meilleurs résultats fonctionnels que les patients ayant eu une résection d'emblée [17].


D'autres études se sont intéressées au taux de reprise mictionnelle chez des hommes ayant eu un épisode de rétention aiguë d'urine en rapport avec une hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate en comparant l'association sonde à demeure et alpha-bloquant à l'association autosondage et alpha-bloquant. Patel et al. ont ainsi montré que le taux de reprise mictionnelle était supérieur dans le groupe autosondage par rapport au groupe sonde à demeure [46].


Les recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent en présence d'une hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate sont présentées dans le Tableau 12.


Gestion des complications du cathétérisme intermittent


Il n'existe ni recommandation ni donnée robuste sur la gestion des complications liées au cathétérisme intermittent hors infections urinaires.


Les recommandations concernant la gestion des complications du cathétérisme intermittent sont présentées dans le Tableau 13.


Conclusion


Ces premières recommandations sur le cathétérisme intermittent sont à la fois destinées aux médecins, aux soignants et aux aidants. Elles devraient permettre d'harmoniser les pratiques.


Il est, en revanche, à déplorer l'absence de données robustes sur le sujet empêchant l'élaboration de recommandations basées sur de hauts niveaux de preuve.


Déclaration de liens d'intérêts


Xavier Gamé : Coloplast, FSK, Hollister, Teleflex, Wellspect Véronique Phé : FSK, Hollister, Wellspect Evelyne Castel-Lacanal : Coloplast, Hollister, Wellspect Véronique Forin : Pas de conflit Marianne de Sèze : Wellspect, Hollister Ornella Lam : Pas de conflit Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler : Coloplast, Wellspect, B Braun Véronique Keppenne : Coloplast, Hollister, Teleflex, Wellspect Jacques Corcos : Pas de conflit Pierre Denys: Coloplast, Wellspect Romain Caremel : Pas de conflit Catherine-Marie Loche : Pas de conflit Maria-Carmelita Scheiber-Nogueira : Coloplast, Hollister, Wellspect Gilles Karsenty : Coloplast, Hollister, Wellspect Alexia Even : Coloplast, Hollister, Wellspect.



Remerciements


Les auteurs remercient l'ensemble des médecins ayant participé à la réalisation de ces recommandations et Diana Kassab pour son soutien méthodologique et sa relecture.




Table 1 - Scope of the application of guidelines.
I - Clinical questions 
1. Indications for intermittent catheterisation 
2. Modalities 
a. Equipment 
b. Implementation (number-frequency-volume-diuresis-micturition-night-touch/no touch...) 
c. Specificities of third-party intermittent catheterisation 
3. Complications of intermittent catheterisation and management 
a. Management of urine culture tests - Infections 
b. Management of other complications 
4. Specific populations 
a. Paediatric populations 
b. Geriatric populations 
5. Specific indications 
a. Intermittent catheterisation and continent urinary diversion with a cutaneous reservoir 
b. Intermittent catheterisation and benign prostatic hyperplasia 
 
II - Organisational issues 
6. Patient education (Training) 
7. Modalities in the city - in a healthcare centre 





Table 2 - All physicians involved in formulating the guidelines for intermittent catheterisation.
Project managers
Alexia Even, Xavier Gamé 
Steering committee
Romain Caremel, Evelyne Castel-Lacanal, Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler, Jacques Corcos, Pierre Denys, Véronique Forin, Gilles Karsenty, Véronique Keppenne, Ornella Lam, Catherine-Marie Loche, Brigitte Perrouin-verbe, Véronique Phé, Gilberte Robain, Maria-Carmelita Scheiber-Nogueira, Brigitte Schurch, Marianne de Sèze 
Scoring group
Gérard Amarenco, Georges Audry, Benjamin Bernuz, Bernard Boillot, Franck Bruyère, Xavier Deffieux, Franck Duchêne, Philippe Grise, Amandine Guinet, Marylène Jousse, Jacques Kerdraon, Reinier Opsomer, Christian Saussine, Renaud de Tayrac 
Review group
Stéphane Bart, Michel Bégué, Ourdia Bouali, Kathleen Charvier, Michel Cosson, Aurélien Descazeaud, Cécile Donzé, Jean-Dominique Doublet, Isabelle Escudié, Brigitte Fatton, Xavier Fritel, Julien Guillotreau, François Kleinclauss, Frédérique Le Breton, Marc Le Fort, Loïc Le Normand, Brigitte Lucas, Richard Mallet, Bernard Parratte, Jean-Gabriel Prévinaire, Jean-Yves Salle, Christian Saussine, Jean-Marc Soler, Hubert Tournebise, Nicolas Wolff 





Table 3 - Guidelines on indications for intermittent catheterisation.
1. Intermittent catheterisation is the reference bladder drainage method for chronic urine retention (strong agreement from the outset) 
2. We strongly recommend privileging intermittent self-catheterisation over third-party intermittent catheterisation (strong agreement from the outset) 
3. Where relevant, we recommend that intermittent catheterisation be favoured over an indwelling catheter for acute urinary retention (moderate agreement) 
4. We strongly recommend the timely implementation of intermittent catheterisation over indwelling catheters for acute urine retention in patients requiring long-term bladder drainage (strong agreement) 
5. Intermittent catheterisation is recommended over an indwelling catheter for the treatment of post-operative urine retention (excluding lower urinary tract surgery) (moderate agreement). 
6. Intermittent catheterisation is recommended for urine retention due to bladder obstructions, excluding stenoses, which are not amenable to medical or surgical treatment (moderate agreement) 
7. Intermittent catheterisation is strongly recommended for neurological disorder patients as an alternative to bladder emptying by percussion, reflexes or abdominal thrust (strong agreement) 
8. If micturition is not expected to resume, we strongly recommend the timely removal of indwelling catheters in favour of intermittent catheterisation (strong agreement) 





Table 4 - Guidelines of training modalities for intermittent catheterisation.
9. We strongly recommend adapting intermittent self-catheterisation patient training to the patient's cognitive and sensory motor functions (strong agreement from the outset) 
10. We recommend that the intermittent self-catheterisation patient training be performed in any healthcare facility having obtained the relevant competencies (moderate agreement) 
11. We strongly recommend adapting the duration of intermittent self-catheterisation patient training to the physical, cognitive and psychological capacities of the patient as well as any patient dependent environmental constraints (strong agreement) 
12. We recommend that intermittent self-catheterisation patient training be based on a formalised protocol (moderate agreement) 
13. A regular medical evaluation of the indications and practice of intermittent self-catheterisation is strongly recommended (strong agreement) 
14. Nurses who train patients to manage intermittent self-catheterisation in the home environment must have acquired the requisite competencies and be under medical supervision (strong agreement) 
15. Nursing staff who train patients to manage intermittent self-catheterisation in healthcare facilities must have acquired the requisite competencies and be under medical supervision (strong agreement) 
16. Depending on the specific circumstances, we strongly recommend that, following training in a healthcare facility, a nurse's home visit should be offered as a follow-up (strong agreement) 
17. We strongly recommend that patient intermittent self-catheterisation training encompasses all the various circumstances encountered in everyday life (different positions, different settings) (strong agreement) 
18. We strongly recommend that the patient be involved in catheter selection (strong agreement) 
19. Intermittent self-catheterisation, even when used after a period of third-party intermittent catheterisation, requires specialised training (strong agreement from the outset) 





Table 5 - Guidelines for the choice of equipment.
20. The catheter must be long enough to allow complete emptying of the bladder (strong agreement from the outset) 
21. Under standard conditions we strongly recommend that adult intermittent urethral catheterisation patients, use French 12 or 14 catheters (strong agreement) 
22. We strongly recommend that men use hydrophilic catheters for intermittent catheterisation (strong agreement) 
23. We strongly recommend that women use hydrophilic catheters for intermittent catheterisation (moderate agreement) 





Table 6 - Guidelines on implementation modalities for intermittent catheterisation.
24. Intermittent catheterisation is feasible at home and outside the home environment (strong agreement from the outset) 
25. Intermittent catheterisation must be feasible at home and outside the home environment (strong agreement from the outset) 
26. We strongly recommend that intermittent catheterisation completely empties the bladder of urine (strong agreement from the outset) 
27. Intermittent catheterisation in adults, with a daily diuresis of between 1.5 and 2 litres per 24-hour period is strongly recommended (strong agreement from the outset) 
28. We strongly recommend not to use gloves for intermittent self-catheterisation (strong agreement from the outset) 
29. We strongly recommend using clean technique for intermittent self-catheterisation (strong agreement) 
30. We strongly recommend that intermittent catheterisation patients abide to low intravesical pressure diets (strong agreement) 
31. For intermittent self-catheterisation, we do not recommend washing the perineal area prior to every single catheterisation (moderate agreement) 
32. For intermittent self-catheterisation, we recommend washing your hands before each catheterisation (moderate agreement) 
33. We strongly recommend not using disinfectants to wash your hands prior to intermittent self-catheterisation (strong agreement) 
34. We strongly recommend not to use alcoholic or non-alcoholic disinfectants to cleanse the external urethral orifice (strong agreement) 
35. In patients carrying out intermittent self-catheterisation at home, we strongly recommend maintaining the same cleaning routine during any hospitalisations (strong agreement) 





Table 7 - Guidelines on indications for performing and managing a urine culture test (UCT) in intermittent catheterisation patients are presented.
36. We strongly recommend that systematic UCTs not be used routinely to screen for bacteria in the urine of intermittent catheterisation patients who do not have any clinical symptoms consistent with urinary tract infections (strong agreement from the outset) 
37. We strongly recommend that systematic UCTs not be used routinely to screen for leucocyturia in intermittent catheterisation patients who do not have any clinical symptoms consistent with urinary tract infections (strong agreement from the outset) 
38. Intermittent catheterisation patients are strongly advised to first increase their fluid intake and the frequency of catheterisation if they notice that their urine is cloudy or foul-smelling in the absence of any additional symptoms (strong agreement from the outset) 
39. If the cloudy or foul-smelling urine persists, in the absence of any additional symptoms, for more than 72hours, despite increasing fluid intake and increasing the frequency of catheterisation, intermittent catheterisation patients are strongly advised to perform a UCT (strong agreement from the outset) 
40. We strongly recommend performing a UCT prior to any exploratory or therapeutic invasive intra-urethral procedure in all intermittent catheterisation patients who do not have clinical symptoms suggestive of a urinary tract infection (strong agreement from the outset) 
41. Intermittent catheterisation patients, are strongly advised not to use urine test strips (strong agreement) 
42. Where a favourable clinical outcome is achieved, we strongly recommend that a repeat UCT not be performed directly after antibiotic therapy for a urinary tract infection in intermittent catheterisation patients (strong agreement) 
43. Intermittent catheterisation patients should have a baseline UCT before any changes in urinary symptoms or neurological symptoms arise (moderate agreement) 
44. We strongly recommend performing a UCT prior to any urodynamic investigation in all intermittent catheterisation patients who do not have clinical symptoms suggestive of a urinary tract infection (moderate agreement) 
45. We strongly recommend treating any bacteriuria 48hours prior to lower urinary tract surgery in intermittent catheterisation patients (strong agreement) 
46. We strongly recommend treating any bacteriuria 48hours prior to any invasive urinary tract examination in intermittent catheterisation patients (strong agreement) 





Table 8 - Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation in the paediatric population.
47. There is no lower age limit which applies to girls or boys for third-party intermittent catheterisation (strong agreement from the outset) 
48. Intermittent self-catheterisation can be considered from the age of 6-7 years (strong agreement from the outset) 
49. We strongly recommend that the transition from adolescent to adult follow-up be structured in the context of a healthcare network to avoid any disruption to care (strong agreement from the outset) 
50. In children, we recommend a progressive transition from third-party intermittent catheterisation to self-catheterisation through a period of third-party intermittent catheterisation and self-catheterisation overlapping (strong agreement) 
51. We strongly recommend adapting the catheter to the anatomy and physical development of the child (strong agreement) 
52. We strongly recommend that the child's intermittent catheterisation be organised in collaboration with socio-educational support (strong agreement) 
53. We strongly recommend children use hydrophilic catheters for intermittent catheterisation (strong agreement) 





Table 9 - Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation in the geriatric population.
54. Age itself is not a barrier to acquiring the skills for intermittent self-catheterisation (strong agreement from the outset) 
55. In the elderly, we recommend that intermittent self-catheterisation training be adapted to the patient's physical and cognitive abilities (strong agreement) 
56. We strongly recommend that the elderly not be exclude from the scope of intermittent catheterisation applications (strong agreement) 





Table 10 - Guidelines for intermittent catheterisation of continent urinary diversions with a cutaneous reservoir are presented.
57. Whenever there is an appendix which can be used to create the catheter conduit, we strongly recommend this approach (strong agreement from the outset) 
58. In the absence of an appendix, we strongly recommend taking a segment of small intestine to create the catheter conduit (strong agreement from the outset) 
59. We strongly recommend that the continent stoma site selection takes into account the patient's functional abilities and anatomy (strong agreement from the outset) 
60. For intermittent catheterisations by way of a continent stoma, we strongly recommend using straight (long) male catheters (strong agreement from the outset) 
61. Before considering the option of a continent urinary diversion with a cutaneous reservoir, we strongly recommend that a multidisciplinary team evaluate the feasibility of catheterisation via a continent stoma (strong agreement) 
62. We strongly recommend that the first catheterisation of a continent stoma be performed in an experienced care centre (strong agreement) 
63. To facilitate mucus clearance following an enterocystoplasty, we strongly recommend using French 14 or 16 catheters, this also applies to children (strong agreement) 
64. We recommend that catheterisations via indwelling catheters or third-party catheterisations via continent stomas, be carried out by an experienced person (moderate agreement) 
65. It is recommended not to leave a continent stoma without catheterization for more than 24hours (moderate agreement) 
66. If it becomes temporarily impossible to perform catheterisations through a continent stoma, we strongly recommend leaving an indwelling urinary catheter in place through the stoma (strong agreement) 
67. If problems of intermittent self-catheterisation via a continent stoma should arise, an emergency urology consultation is strongly recommended (strong agreement) 
68. After completely recovering from the surgery, we strongly recommend that the same modalities of catheterisation (number, frequency, cleaning, diuresis) be applied to continent stomas as through the urethra (strong agreement) 





Table 11 - Guidelines for third-party intermittent catheterisation.
69. Third-party performing intermittent catheterisations do not have to be paramedics as long as they have been trained to carry out intermittent catheterisations (strong agreement from the outset) 
70. We strongly recommend that the patient and the person(s) in charge of carrying out intermittent catheterisations be trained (strong agreement from the outset) 
71. In some special cases, third-party intermittent catheterisations can be alternated with intermittent self-catheterisation to abide to the maximal 4-hour interval between catheterisations (strong agreement from the outset) 
72. In situations other than those encountered in healthcare facilities, third-party intermittent catheterisations who is not a paramedic, should be performed using aseptic or clean technique (moderate agreement) 
73. If intermittent self-catheterisation or an alternative solution is not feasible, we favour third-party intermittent catheterisation over indwelling urinary catheters (moderate agreement) 





Table 12 - Guidelines for benign prostatic hyperplasia patient intermittent catheterisations.
74. In cases of chronic urine retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, we strongly recommend using intermittent catheterisation rather than indwelling urinary catheters (strong agreement from the outset) 
75. We strongly recommend that benign prostatic hyperplasia patients not be exclude from the scope of intermittent catheterisation applications (strong agreement) 





Table 13 - Guidelines for managing intermittent self-catheterisation complications.
76. We strongly recommend referring intermittent catheterisation patients experiencing recurrent macroscopic haematuria to urology (strong agreement from the outset) 
77. We strongly recommend replacing a catheter which has been accidentally inserted into the vagina during intermittent catheterisation in a woman, with a new catheter (strong agreement from the outset) 
78. If a catheter is misdirected and prevents intermittent catheterisation, it is advisable to put in place an indwelling urethral catheter for a period of 10 to 14 days (moderate agreement) 





Tableau 1 - Champs d'application des recommandations.
I - Questions cliniques 
8. Indications du cathétérisme intermittent 
9. Modalités 
a. Matériel 
b. Réalisation (nombre-fréquence-volume-diurèse-mictions-nuit-touch/no touch...) 
c. Spécificités de l'hétérosondage 
10. Complications du cathétérisme intermittent et gestion 
a. Prise en charge des ECBU-Infections 
b. Prise en charge des autres complications 
11. Populations particulières 
a. Pédiatrie 
b. Gériatrie 
12. Indications particulières 
a. Cathétérisme intermittent et dérivation urinaire cutanée continente 
b. Cathétérisme intermittent et hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate 
 
II - Questions organisationnelles 
13. Apprentissage (ETP) 
14. Modalités en ville-en centre de soins 





Tableau 2 - Ensemble des médecins ayant participé à l'élaboration des recommandations sur le cathétérisme intermittent.
Chefs de projet
Alexia Even, Xavier Gamé 
Comité de pilotage
Romain Caremel, Evelyne Castel-Lacanal, Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler, Jacques Corcos, Pierre Denys, Véronique Forin, Gilles Karsenty, Véronique Keppenne, Ornella Lam, Catherine-Marie Loche, Brigitte Perrouin-verbe, Véronique Phé, Gilberte Robain, Maria-Carmelita Scheiber-Nogueira, Brigitte Schurch, Marianne de Sèze 
Groupe de cotation
Gérard Amarenco, Georges Audry, Benjamin Bernuz, Bernard Boillot, Franck Bruyère, Xavier Deffieux, Franck Duchêne, Philippe Grise, Amandine Guinet, Marylène Jousse, Jacques Kerdraon, Reinier Opsomer, Christian Saussine, Renaud de Tayrac 
Groupe de relecture
Stéphane Bart, Michel Bégué, Ourdia Bouali, Kathleen Charvier, Michel Cosson, Aurélien Descazeaud, Cécile Donzé, Jean-Dominique Doublet, Isabelle Escudié, Brigitte Fatton, Xavier Fritel, Julien Guillotreau, François Kleinclauss, Frédérique Le Breton, Marc Le Fort, Loïc Le Normand, Brigitte Lucas, Richard Mallet, Bernard Parratte, Jean-Gabriel Prévinaire, Jean-Yves Salle, Christian Saussine, Jean-Marc Soler, Hubert Tournebise, Nicolas Wolff 





Tableau 3 - Recommandations concernant les indications du cathétérisme intermittent.
1. Le cathétérisme intermittent est le mode de drainage vésical de référence en cas de rétention chronique d'urine (accord fort d'emblée) 
2. Il est fortement recommandé de privilégier l'autosondage à l'hétérosondage (accord fort d'emblée) 
3. Lorsque la situation s'y prête, il est recommandé de préférer le cathétérisme intermittent au sondage à demeure en cas de rétention aiguë d'urine (accord relatif) 
4. Il est fortement recommandé de rapidement préférer le cathétérisme intermittent au sondage à demeure en cas de rétention aiguë d'urine, chez les patients qui nécessiteront un drainage vésical au long cours (accord fort) 
5. Il est recommandé de préférer le cathétérisme intermittent au sondage à demeure pour le traitement de la rétention d'urine post-opératoire (hors chirurgie du bas appareil urinaire) (accord relatif) 
6. Il est recommandé de préférer le cathétérisme intermittent en cas de rétention d'urine sur obstacle sous vésical, hors sténose, ne pouvant pas être traité médicalement ou chirurgicalement (accord relatif) 
7. Chez le patient neurologique, il est fortement recommandé de remplacer par le cathétérisme intermittent, les vidanges vésicales par percussion, réflexes ou par poussée abdominale (accord fort) 
8. En cas d'absence pressentie de reprise de miction, il est fortement recommandé de retirer la sonde à demeure le plus précocement possible au profit du cathétérisme intermittent (accord fort) 





Tableau 4 - Recommandations concernant les modalités d'apprentissage du cathétérisme intermittent.
9. Il est fortement recommandé d'adapter l'apprentissage de l'autosondage aux fonctions cognitives et sensitivo-motrices du patient (accord fort d'emblée) 
10. Il est recommandé de réaliser l'apprentissage de l'autosondage dans toute structure de soins en ayant acquis les compétences (accord relatif) 
11. Il est fortement recommandé d'adapter la durée de l'apprentissage de l'autosondage aux capacités physiques, cognitives, psychologiques et environnementales du patient (accord fort) 
12. Il est recommandé de faire reposer l'apprentissage de l'autosondage sur un protocole formalisé (accord relatif) 
13. Il est fortement recommandé de réaliser une évaluation médicale régulière de l'indication et de la pratique de l'autosondage intermittent (accord fort) 
14. L'apprentissage de l'autosondage intermittent à domicile par un personnel infirmier nécessite pour ce dernier d'avoir acquis les compétences et d'être sous coordination médicale (accord fort) 
15. L'apprentissage de l'autosondage intermittent en structure de soins par un personnel infirmier nécessite pour ce dernier d'avoir acquis les compétences et d'être sous coordination médicale (accord fort) 
16. Il est fortement recommandé que selon les circonstances, au décours d'un apprentissage en structure de soins, la prescription d'un relais infirmier à domicile soit proposée (accord fort) 
17. Il est fortement recommandé que l'apprentissage inclut les différentes circonstances de la vie quotidienne (différentes positions, différents lieux) de réalisation du sondage (accord fort) 
18. Il est fortement recommandé d'inclure le patient dans le choix de la sonde (accord fort) 
19. La mise sous autosondage, y compris après une période d'hétérosondage, nécessite un apprentissage spécialisé (accord fort d'emblée) 





Tableau 5 - Recommandations concernant le choix du matériel.
20. La longueur de la sonde doit permettre d'assurer une vidange complète de la vessie (accord fort d'emblée) 
21. Dans les conditions standards de cathétérisme intermittent uréthral, chez l'adulte, il est fortement recommandé d'utiliser des sondes charrière 12 ou 14 (accord fort) 
22. Pour le cathétérisme intermittent, il est fortement recommandé de privilégier les sondes hydrophiles chez l'homme (accord fort) 
23. Pour le cathétérisme intermittent, il est recommandé de privilégier les sondes hydrophiles chez la femme (accord relatif) 





Tableau 6 - Recommandations concernant les modalités de réalisation du cathétérisme intermittent.
24. Le cathétérisme intermittent est réalisable à domicile et en dehors du domicile (accord fort d'emblée) 
25. Le cathétérisme intermittent doit pouvoir être réalisé à domicile et en dehors du domicile (accord fort d'emblée) 
26. Il est fortement recommandé que la vidange vésicale par cathétérisme intermittent soit complète (accord fort d'emblée) 
27. Chez l'adulte sous cathétérisme intermittent, il est fortement recommandé que la diurèse quotidienne conseillée soit entre 1,5 et 2 litres par 24heures (accord fort d'emblée) 
28. Pour l'autosondage, il est fortement recommandé de ne pas utiliser de gants (accord fort d'emblée) 
29. Pour l'autosondage, il est fortement recommandé d'utiliser la technique propre (accord fort) 
30. Il est fortement recommandé d'obtenir un régime de basse pression intravésicale chez le patient sous cathétérisme intermittent (accord fort) 
31. Pour l'autosondage, il n'est pas recommandé d'effectuer une toilette périnéale avant chaque sondage (accord relatif) 
32. Pour l'autosondage, il est recommandé une hygiène des mains avant chaque sondage (accord relatif) 
33. Pour l'autosondage, il est fortement recommandé de ne pas utiliser de désinfectants pour se nettoyer les mains (accord fort) 
34. Pour l'autosondage, il est fortement recommandé de ne pas utiliser de désinfectants alcooliques ou non pour se nettoyer le méat urinaire (accord fort) 
35. Chez le patient sous autosondage à domicile, il est fortement recommandé de maintenir la technique propre habituelle au cours d'une hospitalisation (accord fort) 





Tableau 7 - Recommandations concernant les indications à la réalisation et la gestion d'un examen cytobactériologique des urines (ECBU) chez un patient sous cathétérisme intermittent.
36. Il est fortement recommandé de ne pas pratiquer d'ECBU réguliers à titre systématique pour le dépistage de bactériurie chez les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent n'ayant pas de symptômes cliniques évocateurs d'infection urinaire (accord fort d'emblée) 
37. Il est fortement recommandé de ne pas pratiquer d'ECBU réguliers à titre systématique pour le dépistage d'une leucocyturie chez les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent n'ayant pas de symptômes cliniques évocateurs d'infection urinaire (accord fort d'emblée) 
38. Chez les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent, il est fortement recommandé, lors de la simple constatation d'urines sales ou malodorantes sans signes associés, de faire en premier lieu augmenter le volume des boissons et la fréquence des sondages (accord fort d'emblée) 
39. Chez les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent, en cas de persistance au-delà de 72heures d'urines sales ou malodorantes sans signes associés malgré une augmentation du volume des boissons et de la fréquence des sondages, il est fortement recommandé de réaliser un ECBU (accord fort d'emblée) 
40. Il est fortement recommandé de réaliser un ECBU avant tout geste endo-urétral invasif exploratoire ou thérapeutique chez tous les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent n'ayant pas de symptômes cliniques évocateurs d'infection urinaire (accord fort d'emblée) 
41. Chez le patient sous cathétérisme intermittent, il est fortement recommandé de ne pas utiliser la bandelette urinaire (Accord fort) 
42. En cas d'évolution clinique favorable, il est fortement recommandé de ne pas réaliser d'ECBU de contrôle après antibiothérapie adaptée d'une infection urinaire chez le patient sous cathétérisme intermittent (Accord fort) 
43. Chez les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent, il est recommandé de faire pratiquer un ECBU devant toute modification des symptômes urinaires ou neurologiques (Accord relatif) 
44. Il est recommandé de réaliser un ECBU avant exploration urodynamique chez les patients sous cathétérisme intermittent n'ayant pas de symptômes cliniques évocateurs d'infection urinaire (Accord relatif) 
45. Chez le patient sous cathétérisme intermittent, il est fortement recommandé de traiter la colonisation bactérienne 48heures avant une intervention chirurgicale sur le bas appareil urinaire (Accord fort) 
46. Chez le patient sous cathétérisme intermittent, il est recommandé de traiter la colonisation bactérienne 48heures avant tout examen invasif sur le bas appareil urinaire (Accord relatif) 





Tableau 8 - Recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent dans la population pédiatrique.
47. Pour l'hétérosondage, il n'y a pas de limite inférieure d'âge (fille ou garçon) (accord fort d'emblée) 
48. L'autosondage peut être envisagé à partir de l'âge de 6-7 ans (accord fort d'emblée) 
49. À l'adolescence il est fortement recommandé que le transfert vers le suivi adulte soit organisé dans le cadre d'un réseau pour éviter toute rupture de soins (accord fort d'emblée) 
50. Chez l'enfant, il est recommandé un relai hétérosondage-autosondage progressif avec une période de chevauchement HS-AS (Accord fort) 
51. Il est fortement recommandé d'adapter la sonde à l'anatomie et à la croissance de l'enfant (Accord fort) 
52. Il est fortement recommandé d'organiser le cathétérisme intermittent de l'enfant en collaboration avec l'encadrement socio-éducatif (Accord fort) 
53. Pour le cathétérisme intermittent, il est fortement recommandé de privilégier les sondes hydrophiles chez l'enfant (Accord fort) 





Tableau 9 - Recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent dans la population gériatrique.
54. L'âge en soi n'est pas un frein à l'apprentissage de l'autosondage (accord fort d'emblée) 
55. Chez le sujet âgé, il est recommandé d'adapter l'apprentissage de l'autosondage aux capacités physiques et cognitives du patient (Accord fort) 
56. Il est fortement recommandé de ne pas exclure la personne âgée du champ d'application du cathétérisme intermittent (Accord fort) 





Tableau 10 - Recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent en cas de dérivation urinaire cutanée continente.
57. Chaque fois que l'appendice est présent et utilisable, il est fortement recommandé de l'utiliser pour confectionner le tube cathétérisable (accord fort d'emblée) 
58. En l'absence d'appendice, il est fortement recommandé de prélever un segment d'intestin grêle pour la confection du tube cathétérisable (accord fort d'emblée) 
59. Il est fortement recommandé d'adapter la position de la stomie continente aux capacités fonctionnelles et à l'anatomie du patient (accord fort d'emblée) 
60. Il est fortement recommandé d'utiliser des sondes d'homme (longues) droites pour le cathétérisme intermittent par une stomie continente (accord fort d'emblée) 
61. Avant d'envisager une dérivation urinaire cutanée continente, il est fortement recommandé d'évaluer les capacités de sondage via une stomie continente par une équipe multidisciplinaire (Accord fort) 
62. Il est fortement recommandé que le premier sondage par une stomie continente soit réalisé dans un centre de soins expérimenté (Accord fort) 
63. Pour faciliter l'évacuation du mucus en cas d'entérocystoplastie, il est fortement recommandé d'utiliser des sondes charrière 14 ou 16, y compris chez l'enfant (Accord fort) 
64. Si nécessité de sondage à demeure ou d'hétérosondage par une stomie continente, il est recommandé que le sondage soit réalisé par une personne expérimentée (Accord relatif) 
65. Il est recommandé de ne pas laisser une stomie continente sans sondage pendant plus de 24heures (Accord relatif) 
66. En cas d'impossibilité temporaire de réaliser les sondages par une stomie continente, il est fortement recommandé de laisser une sonde à demeure par la stomie (Accord fort) 
67. En cas de difficulté d'autosondage par une stomie continente, une consultation en urgence en urologie est fortement recommandée (Accord fort) 
68. À distance de la chirurgie, il est fortement recommandé d'appliquer les mêmes modalités de sondage (nombre, fréquence, nettoyage, diurèse) par une stomie continente que celles par voie uréthrale (Accord fort) 





Tableau 11 - Recommandations concernant l'hétérosondage.
69. L'hétérosondage peut être réalisé par un aidant non paramédical formé à la technique du sondage intermittent (accord fort d'emblée) 
70. Il est fortement recommandé que le patient et la ou les personnes en charge de réaliser des hétérosondages aient une formation (accord fort d'emblée) 
71. Dans certains cas particuliers, des hétérosondages peuvent être associés à des autosondages pour permettre de respecter l'intervalle maximal de 4heures entre deux vidanges (accord fort d'emblée) 
72. En dehors d'une structure de soins et en cas d'hétérosondages par un aidant non paramédical, il est recommandé de réaliser l'hétérosondage selon la technique stérile ou propre (Accord relatif) 
73. En cas d'impossibilité de pratiquer l'autosondage ou d'une solution alternative, il est recommandé de privilégier l'hétérosondage aux cathéters à demeure (Accord relatif) 





Tableau 12 - Recommandations concernant le cathétérisme intermittent en présence d'une hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate.
74. En cas de rétention chronique d'urine sur hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate, il est fortement recommandé de privilégier le cathétérisme intermittent à la sonde à demeure (accord fort d'emblée) 
75. Il est fortement recommandé de ne pas exclure les patients ayant une hyperplasie bénigne de la prostate du champ d'applications du cathétérisme intermittent (Accord fort) 





Tableau 13 - Recommandations concernant la gestion des complications de l'autosondage.
76. Il est fortement recommandé d'adresser le patient en urologie en cas d'hématurie macroscopique récidivante chez un patient sous cathétérisme intermittent (Accord fort d'emblée) 
77. Lors d'un sondage féminin, si introduction de la sonde dans le vagin, il est fortement recommandé de la changer (accord fort d'emblée) 
78. En cas de fausse route empêchant le cathétérisme intermittent, il est recommandé de laisser en place une sonde uréthrale à demeure pendant 10 à 14jours (Accord relatif) 




References



Lapides J., Diokno A.C., Silber S.J., Lowe B.S. Clean, intermittent self-catheterization in the treatment of urinary tract disease J Urol 1972 ;  107 (3) : 458-461 [cross-ref]
Guttmann L., Frankel H. The value of intermittent catheterisation in the early management of traumatic paraplegia and tetraplegia Paraplegia 1966 ;  4 (2) : 63-70 [cross-ref]
Groen J., Pannek J., Castro Diaz D., Del Popolo G., Gross T., Hamid R., et al. Summary of European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines on Neuro-Urology Eur Urol 2016 ;  69 (2) : 324-333 [cross-ref]
Lucas M.G., Bosch R.J.L., Burkhard F.C., Cruz F., Madden T.B., Nambiar A.K., et al. EAU guidelines on assessment and nonsurgical management of urinary incontinence Eur Urol 2012 ;  62 (6) : 1130-1142 [cross-ref]
Boulkedid R., Abdoul H., Loustau M., Sibony O., Alberti C. Using and reporting the Delphi method for selecting healthcare quality indicators: a systematic review PloS One 2011 ;  6 (6) : e20476
Kidd E.A., Stewart F., Kassis N.C., Hom E., Omar M.I. Urethral (indwelling or intermittent) or suprapubic routes for short-term catheterisation in hospitalised adults Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 ; CD004203
Hakvoort R.A., Thijs S.D., Bouwmeester F.W., Broekman A.M., Ruhe I.M., Vernooij M.M., et al. Comparing clean intermittent catheterisation and transurethral indwelling catheterisation for incomplete voiding after vaginal prolapse surgery: a multicentre randomised trial BJOG Int J Obstet Gynaecol 2011 ;  118 (9) : 1055-1060 [cross-ref]
Tang M.W.S., Kwok T.C.Y., Hui E., Woo J. Intermittent versus indwelling urinary catheterization in older female patients Maturitas 2006 ;  53 (3) : 274-281 [cross-ref]
Dixon L., Dolan L.M., Brown K., Hilton P. RCT of urethral versus suprapubic catheterization Br J Nurs Mark Allen Publ 2010 ;  19 (18) : S7-S13 [inter-ref]
Jannelli M.L., Wu J.M., Plunkett L.W., Williams K.S., Visco A.G. A randomized controlled trial of clean intermittent self-catheterization versus suprapubic catheterization after urogynecologic surgery Am J Obstet Gynecol 2007 ;  197 (1) : 72.e1-4.
Naik R., Maughan K., Nordin A., Lopes A., Godfrey K.A., Hatem M.H. A prospective randomised controlled trial of intermittent self-catheterisation vs. supra-pubic catheterisation for post-operative bladder care following radical hysterectomy Gynecol Oncol 2005 ;  99 (2) : 437-442 [cross-ref]
Niël-Weise B.S., van den Broek P.J., da Silva E.M.K., Silva L.A. Urinary catheter policies for long-term bladder drainage Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2012 ; CD004201.
Jamison J., Maguire S., McCann J. Catheter policies for management of long term voiding problems in adults with neurogenic bladder disorders Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 ; CD004375
de Sèze M., Ruffion A., Denys P., Joseph P.-A., Perrouin-Verbe B. GENULF. The neurogenic bladder in multiple sclerosis: review of the literature and proposal of management guidelines Mult Scler Houndmills Basingstoke Engl 2007 ;  13 (7) : 915-928
Ruffion A., de Sèze M., Denys P., Perrouin-Verbe B., Chartier-Kastler E. Groupe d'Etudes de Neuro-Urologie de Langue Française. [Groupe d'Etudes de Neuro-Urologie de Langue Française (GENULF) guidelines for the management of spinal cord injury and spina bifida patients] Progres En Urol 2007 ;  17 (3) : 631-633 [cross-ref]
Romo P.G.B., Smith C.P., Cox A., Averbeck M.A., Dowling C., Beckford C., et al. Non-surgical urologic management of neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury World J Urol 2018 ;  36 (10) : 1555-1568 [cross-ref]
Ghalayini I.F., Al-Ghazo M.A., Pickard R.S. A prospective randomized trial comparing transurethral prostatic resection and clean intermittent self-catheterization in men with chronic urinary retention BJU Int 2005 ;  96 (1) : 93-97 [cross-ref]
Schumm K., Lam T.B.L. Types of urethral catheters for management of short-term voiding problems in hospitalised adults Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2008 ; CD004013.
Prieto J., Murphy C.L., Moore K.N., Fader M. Intermittent catheterisation for long-term bladder management Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2014 ; CD006008.
Lucas E.J., Baxter C., Singh C., Mohamed A.Z., Li B., Zhang J., et al. Comparison of the microbiological milieu of patients randomized to either hydrophilic or conventional PVC catheters for clean intermittent catheterization J Pediatr Urol 2016 ;  12 (3) : 172.e1-8.
Kiddoo D., Sawatzky B., Bascu C., Dharamsi N., Afshar K., Moore K. Randomized crossover trial of single use hydrophilic coated vs multiple use polyvinylchloride catheters for intermittent catheterization to determi... - PubMed - NCBI [Internet]  :  (2014). [cité 7 sept 2019]. Disponible sur : 25584995.
Cardenas D.D., Moore K.N., Dannels-McClure A., Scelza W.M., Graves D.E., Brooks M., et al. Intermittent catheterization with a hydrophilic-coated catheter delays urinary tract infections in acute spinal cord injury: a prospective, randomized, multicenter trial PM R 2011 ;  3 (5) : 408-417 [cross-ref]
Cardenas D.D., Hoffman J.M. Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2009 ;  90 (10) : 1668-1671 [cross-ref]
De Ridder D.J.M.K., Everaert K., Fernández L.G., Valero J.V.F., Durán A.B., Abrisqueta M.L.J., et al. Intermittent catheterisation with hydrophilic-coated catheters (SpeediCath) reduces the risk of clinical urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective randomised parallel comparative trial Eur Urol 2005 ;  48 (6) : 991-995 [cross-ref]
Vapnek J.M., Maynard F.M., Kim J. A prospective randomized trial of the LoFric hydrophilic coated catheter versus conventional plastic catheter for clean intermittent catheterization J Urol 2003 ;  169 (3) : 994-998 [cross-ref]
Sarica S., Akkoc Y., Karapolat H., Aktug H. Comparison of the use of conventional, hydrophilic and gel-lubricated catheters with regard to urethral micro trauma, urinary system infection, and... - PubMed - NCBI [Internet]  :  (2010). [cité 7 sept 2019]. Disponible sur : 20445490.
Rognoni C., Tarricone R. Intermittent catheterisation with hydrophilic and non-hydrophilic urinary catheters: systematic literature review and meta-analyses BMC Urol 2017 ;  17 (1) : 4
Day R.A., Moore K.N., Albers M.K. A pilot study comparing two methods of intermittent catheterization: limitations and challenges Urol Nurs 2003 ;  23 (2) : 143-7, 158.
Duffy L.M., Cleary J., Ahern S., Kuskowski M.A., West M., Wheeler L., et al. Clean intermittent catheterization: safe, cost-effective bladder management for male residents of VA nursing homes J Am Geriatr Soc 1995 ;  43 (8) : 865-870 [cross-ref]
King R.B., Carlson C.E., Mervine J., Wu Y., Yarkony G.M. Clean and sterile intermittent catheterization methods in hospitalized patients with spinal cord injury Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992 ;  73 (9) : 798-802
Moore K.N., Fader M., Getliffe K. Long-term bladder management by intermittent catheterisation in adults and children Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007 ; CD006008.
Prieto-Fingerhut T., Banovac K., Lynne C.M. A study comparing sterile and nonsterile urethral catheterization in patients with spinal cord injury Rehabil Nurs 1997 ;  22 (6) : 299-302 [cross-ref]
Quigley P.A., Riggin O.Z. A comparison of open and closed catheterization techniques in rehabilitation patients Rehabil Nurs 1993 ;  18 (1) : 26-9, 33.
Bakke A., Digranes A., Høisaeter P.A. Physical predictors of infection in patients treated with clean intermittent catheterization: a prospective 7-year study Br J Urol 1997 ;  79 (1) : 85-90
Caron F., Galperine T., Flateau C., Azria R., Bonacorsi S., Bruyère F., et al. Practice guidelines for the management of adult community-acquired urinary tract infections. - PubMed - NCBI [Internet]  :  (2018). [cité 7 sept 2019]. Disponible sur : 29759852.
Egrot C., Dinh A., Amarenco G., Bernard L., Birgand G., Bruyère F., et al. Antibiotic prophylaxis in urodynamics: clinical practice guidelines using a formal consensus method Progres En Urol 2018 ;  28 (17) : 943-952 [inter-ref]
Zegers B., Uiterwaal C., Kimpen J., van Gool J., de Jong T., Winkler-Seinstra P., et al. Antibiotic prophylaxis for urinary tract infections in children with spina bifida on intermittent catheterization J Urol 2011 ;  186 (6) : 2365-2370 [cross-ref]
Johnson H.W., Anderson J.D., Chambers G.K., Arnold W.J., Irwin B.J., Brinton J.R. A short-term study of nitrofurantoin prophylaxis in children managed with clean intermittent catheterization Pediatrics 1994 ;  93 (5) : 752-755
Schlager T.A., Anderson S., Trudell J., Hendley J.O. Nitrofurantoin prophylaxis for bacteriuria and urinary tract infection in children with neurogenic bladder on intermittent catheterization J Pediatr 1998 ;  132 (4) : 704-708 [inter-ref]
Sutherland R.S., Kogan B.A., Baskin L.S., Mevorach R.A. Clean intermittent catheterization in boys using the LoFric catheter J Urol 1996 ;  156 (6) : 2041-2043 [cross-ref]
Parsons B.A., Narshi A., Drake M.J. Success rates for learning intermittent self-catheterisation according to age and gender Int Urol Nephrol 2012 ;  44 (4) : 1127-1131 [cross-ref]
Girotti M.E., MacCornick S., Perissé H., Batezini N.S., Almeida F.G. Determining the variables associated to clean intermittent self-catheterization adherence rate: one-year follow-up study Int Braz J Urol 2011 ;  37 (6) : 766-772 [cross-ref]
Hentzen C., Haddad R., Ismael S.S., Peyronnet B., Gamé X., Denys P., et al. Predictive factors of adherence to urinary self-catheterization in older adults Neurourol Urodyn 2019 ;  38 (2) : 770-778 [cross-ref]
Hentzen C., Haddad R., Ismael S.S., Peyronnet B., Gamé X., Denys P., et al. Intermittent self-catheterization in older adults: predictors of success for technique learning Int Neurourol J 2018 ;  22 (1) : 65-71 [cross-ref]
Phé V., Boissier R., Blok B.F.M., Del Popolo G., Musco S., Castro-Diaz D., et al. Continent catheterizable tubes/stomas in adult neuro-urological patients: a systematic review Neurourol Urodyn 2017 ;  36 (7) : 1711-1722
Ardelt P.U., Woodhouse C.R.J., Riedmiller H., Gerharz E.W. The efferent segment in continent cutaneous urinary diversion: a comprehensive review of the literature BJU Int 2012 ;  109 (2) : 288-297 [cross-ref]
Even A. Comment bien sélectionner un patient avant la réalisation d'une dérivation cutanée continente pour vessie neurologique ? Prog Urol FMC 2016 ;  26 : F6-9.






© 2020 
Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.